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Shimming the Eclipse chainring

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    Shimming the Eclipse chainring

    I've searched around but couldn't find anything on this so far. Since the eclipse chainring separates in 2 pieces, has anyone come up with a conforming shim or other method to further increase offset?

    I successfully converted a Kona Process 153se using an eclipse ring and I have enough clearance for an additional 10mm of offset to regain some gears.

    Thanks.

    #2
    Have you looked at this ?

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      #3
      It offsets the entire thing , and you could stack a few with strong bolts

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        #4
        ...oh wait , maybe you're trying to go the OTHER way, duh , lol

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          #5
          Originally posted by Steampunk View Post
          Have you looked at this ?
          Although the OP wanted more offset, I needed less. I used a couple of the shims luna sells and they worked really well. I was considering milling (I am fortunate enough to have a nice milling machine in my workshop) the Eclipse to be a perfect fit without shims as I only needed about one and a half. Now I know how much material to remove. I'd thin the part that connects to the crank, not the chain ring which, I assume, has the threads for the bolts.

          BTW, has anybody else cut themselves on their Eclipse? Mine has some very sharp edges. I was putting it on with the two shims and all of a sudden, there was blood. I always say, no project is really complete without a little spillage of blood. LOL.

          I don't see why you couldn't use stacks of washers, at least to learn how much more offset you need. Then custom spacers would be easily fabricated.

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            #6
            Yeah I'm looking to increase offset, not decrease. Therefore I would need a shim on the cog itself, and not where the chainring meets the motor. I did think about shimming it with washers and go for a test ride on low power just to see how it shifts, then figure out how to make a proper shim. But I was hoping someone had already done that third party...guess not.

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              #7
              I think you need to get a bunch of washers at the hardware store. Probably need some longer bolts, depending on how many washers get you where you need to be. Detach the chainring from the part that attaches to the motor and add washers till you figure out what you need.

              I'll say my exercise in shimming allows me to access all 9 gears on the rear wheel without really having to change the adjustment on my derailleur, at least on the workstand. I just got the bike wired up and need to test it under load.

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