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Bike Chain Replacement

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  • Retrorockit
    commented on 's reply
    So maybe you did the math for me.

  • AZguy
    commented on 's reply
    Yeah but I often use a pint per tire - never less than 8oz =]

  • Retrorockit
    commented on 's reply
    OK the Stans arrived and I did it the way AZ said. 4oz per tire. After I got done I realized AZ's tires are about 4x the volume of my street tires. So I should have plenty in there. LOL!

  • Retrorockit
    commented on 's reply
    I ordered the pint bottle so I'll have enough to do it right.

  • calfee20
    commented on 's reply
    AZguy set me straight on Stans. It is the only way to go but you should do it his way which is use a lot Inside the tube. That way if you decide to try a new style tire you won't have a sticky mess because everything is in the tube. I tried tubeless and it works but I was always getting moisture tracks from the bead area. Using tubes fixes that problem plus the mess when it is time to replace tires.

  • AZguy
    commented on 's reply
    I've never met a stans convert that ever went back =]

    As mentioned I use a lot more than they tell you to use (2-4x)

  • Retrorockit
    commented on 's reply
    I just ordered some Stans and the installation syringe. If I get a flat with it i'll just throw away the sloppy mess and put in a new spare tube

  • Robert07
    replied
    Knowing how to put a chain on a mountain bike will guarantee you a perfect ride. The bicycle chain is important because it transfers energy from the pedals to the wheels. You should initially locate the chain master link and immediately remove it. Using your hands and a chain tool, press the pin to the master link and squeeze the two ends of the master link in an inward direction. Ensure that the pins are being removed from the slot so you can easily detach the chain. Then, prepare the new chain you will use for replacement. Finally, you have to fit the chain into the drivetrain, ensure that you put the chain back on a mountain bike securely, and join the loose ends to ensure that the ends are securely fastened.
    Last edited by Robert07; 11-27-2021, 01:31 AM.

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  • AZguy
    commented on 's reply
    I suspect a patch will just stick to the tire with the stans without needing any cement since it essentially is cement - but you never know and I'd still put cement on the patch

    What works for some doesn't always work for others but I've yet to meet someone that started putting stans in their tubes that in the end didn't think it was a huge advantage...

    There is a learning curve... I use the syringe (I just use it without the plunger like a funnel)... if new tube put it in before you even put the tubes in the tires and do it over the sink just in case it spills - it stains (stans stains - hahah)... I use a lot more than they recommend 2-4x and haven't need to add more later (they tell you 7mo or something like that for more)... again with the valve position for pressure checks and changes... if you do let all the air out for whatever reason (like topping off) and you have picked up a lot of thorns it's a good idea to take the tire off (or at least one side) and _carefully_ run your hand around the inside and if there are pointy things, cut them off or pull them out...

    And near the very top of recommendations - If you have a thorn resist all urges to pull it out!!! Just let it break off or come out while riding... it's like a scab - don't pick it!

  • Retrorockit
    commented on 's reply
    I can throw a large patch on a 1/4" slice in a tire and tube and ride on. Unless it's covered in goo. I know the smaller flats will go away. I will probably try iStans just because that's what I do. But I've probably replaced more tubes because of tire sealer than because of flats.

  • AZguy
    commented on 's reply
    +1 on stans vs slime - two completely different animals... I would give it a whirl in the tubes... I had friends sing stans virtues to me and admittedly was a bit deaf to it until I saw a demonstration at the overland expo where they were driving a 4x4 over a bed of nails (mixed wood and metal) and that got my attention... then I went and tried it, had a few learning experiences that made a mess but have never had a flat in around 9000mi... the LBS's here offer "flat-proofing" - out here there are so many goat heads and other thorns that even riding street only you'd be lucky to go more than a few days of riding without a flat - the "flat-proofing" typically involves stans in tubes (some use liners in addition to stans but to the best of my knowledge they all use stans for this service)...

  • calfee20
    commented on 's reply
    This is where mid-drives have an advantage over hub drives in that you haven't changed the wheels. So it is easy to R&R a wheel and fix a flat. It is a big pain to R&R a hub motor.

    Don't confuse Stans with Slime. Slime sucks. You should give Stans a try inside the tube and still carry your spare tube and tools. Maybe you won't need them.

  • Retrorockit
    commented on 's reply
    I don't think I want to glue my Schrader valves shut (again). About the only thing I want to do religiously is ride my bike. So I don't think the Stans in a tube trick is for me. I'll just carry a spare tube like a spare tire in a car. It's actually about the same amount of work to stuff a new tube in as change a car tire.With CO2 I can even skip the monotony of pumping. I'll carry the pump anyway, and some patches too as a backup. Might get a flat twice or something. I'm pretty confident in the riveted chain staying together, but might start to carry some stuff for that anyway.

  • AZguy
    commented on 's reply
    I religiously turn the wheels so the stem is at the 5o'clock/7o'clock position and let it sit there for a minute or two before fussing with them. That position allows any stans [which is super thin] to drain from the stem and not over the "puddle" in the bottom. Worst case it just takes a pipe cleaner poke to clear them but since adopting the 5o'clock/7o'clock position it hasn't been an issue.

    Stans is pretty much rubber cement dissolved in the brew and I've had no issues with it attacking rubber

    A plug kit is first line of defense with tubeless tires and it's uncommon that they're needed - lezyne also has a very cute tiny little kit: https://ride.lezyne.com/products/1-p...de8a5307&_ss=r... worst case a patch on the inside is pretty easy since the "glue" is already in there - the hard part would be just making sure you didn't spill a bunch of sealant while applying...

  • Retrorockit
    commented on 's reply
    I tried the inverted CO2 method based on your frostbite experience. Stans inside the tubes sounds good. But sealed tubes have stuck the Schrader valves shut in the past, and I've had the stems pull out of the tubes due to the Slime product dissolving the rubber. Sealed tubes are basically the reason I started carrying a spare tube. But I haven't tried Stans. I would probably like the way a tubeless conversion rides. But I don't know how to fix it when there is a problem. I like the Lenzyne pump. It would be more inconspicuous than what I have now. I just ordered one. Even though I ride urban I have a "Do Not Feed the Animals" policy.
    Last edited by Retrorockit; 11-01-2021, 09:44 AM.
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