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Questions about Bafang BBS02 on 20" trike

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  • BK Xray
    commented on 's reply
    One like this: https://www.amazon.com/Bikehand-Bicy...s%2C684&sr=8-4

  • bitlownow
    commented on 's reply
    thanks for your help I'm finally getting my mid Drive shipped to me.
    which bottom bracket tool do I need

  • Dshue
    replied
    The speed sensor comes with a mount for the chainstay. It is pretty decent. Click image for larger version

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    It has a magnet that mounts to a spoke. Mine hasn't budged after 1000 miles. And it doesn't seem to be picky about alignment either.

    Leave a comment:


  • bitlownow
    replied
    like to see some pictures of the work

    Leave a comment:


  • bitlownow
    replied
    I got my Terratrike Maverick A week ago I’m waiting on the bafang motor kit.
    I have some questions.
    The speed sensor where to put it and how to attach it?
    A mounting bracket maybe ?

    Leave a comment:


  • Retrorockit
    commented on 's reply
    Riding street in South Florida is like a high speed parking lot. Except with fewer rules. Trikes are too wide for tight urban environments. If you have a safe place to ride them they could be lot of fun. I've had to hit the brakes too many times to avoid being squeezed up against a curb (sometimes intentionally) to ever try riding one around here. You have a lot more exit strategies with a narrow 2 wheeler than a trike.
    Last edited by Retrorockit; 03-27-2022, 08:33 AM.

  • BK Xray
    commented on 's reply
    I have many thousands of miles on trikes. I have found them to be safer than regular bikes in most road situations. Recumbent trikes are unusual enough that they get drivers attention. They give us much more space than when riding a 2 wheeler. The only time I have trouble is in parking lots where it is hard to be seen because of tightly packed cars. Drivers can see things like potholes and maneuver around them and a trike is much more visible. Inattention is what's dangerous, so riding something that gets driver's attention helps.

  • Retrorockit
    commented on 's reply
    Being aware makes a big difference. But others being aware also is more problematic.I do ride in one of the more difficult environments so my solutions might not be correct for others.The daytime strobe is a good idea. Lights work much better than flags or reflectors.I also prefer faster pulsation rate for fast Ebikes. Be warned if you have 2 lights it can confuse drivers and make them think a motor vehicle is doing "something" unusual. Reactions can be very unpredictable.

  • Headdead
    commented on 's reply
    This is a concern, but my wife has balance and stability issues - after falling from her bike, again, it's either a trike or nothing. I looked into adult training wheels but found nothing suitable. She is an engineer, understands trike dynamics and recognizes the danger. Her Teratrike Maverick has 3 20" wheels; this lowers the CG a bit and reduces (somewhat) the instability in turns, but it also lowers the visibility a bit. The visibility issue is real, even though I mounted a flag and 3 flashing red strobe; she is looking for a 2nd flag. It is unusual for her to bike alone, so I provide a bit of visibility too. But we are aware.
    The mid-drive Bafang is an experiment that I'm hoping works out. I could see moving it to my bike if there's a better solution for her trike.

  • BK Xray
    replied
    I have installed multiple Bafang and TSDZ2 mid drives on recumbent bikes and trikes. I'm putting one on my new ICE Adventure right now in fact. I wouldn't worry about the 46 tooth chainring being too big. With the 20" wheel recumbents, I usually use a 50 or 52. She will have no problem with it at 46. (I used a 40t for our tandem trike) The only lines I had to lengthen were the speed sensor and battery cable. I only used one of the brake cut offs so I could keep one of the parking brakes. I have had no problems using the Bafang brake handles with V brakes, disc or drums. I use these mounts to install the battery: https://ebikes.ca/bottle-bob.html

    Leave a comment:


  • Retrorockit
    replied
    I rode a recumbent trike a couple times. The one thing I recall is it would easily jack up on 2 wheels if you tried a sharp turn at any kind of speed. Recumbents are known for being fast and a motor would increase that. Maybe a hub motor kit would be worth a look? I also don't like them for road use because they're hard to see in traffic. A guy I know got killed doing that.

    Leave a comment:


  • Headdead
    replied
    I like these brake sensors.
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...IW8D2PLKT&th=1
    They appear to operate similarly to the gear sensor - the brake cable goes through the housing, rather than taping/gluing the unit/magnet to the brake lever.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dshue
    commented on 's reply
    The difference between the bafang brake levers and quality levers on a setup that uses mountain bike brake calipers of any sort is large. The brake force you get if you pull the bafang levers all the way to the grip is equivalent to a quality lever at half stroke.
    The bafang levers have a cable pull that falls directly between what is ideal for road calipers/cantilever and mountain calipers.
    Honestly $20 more from Lunacycle for the hydraulic brake switches is far and away the best way to go.
    If you decide to go with the hydraulic brake switches many here can help you to set them up. It's not hard. The basics are to make sure the magnet is very close to the sensor and that before you glue the magnet on you have it orientated so that you get the best magnetic field. The sensors come with double sided tape. Find the spot where the sensor and magnet fit best and stick the sensor on. Then find the best field orientation for the magnet and mark it with an arrow. Mix some 2 part epoxy and glue the magnet in place. Check for proper operation, if it works properly then remove the sensor and clean off the adhesive. Clean both the sensor and the area of the lever where it goes with isopropyl alcohol. Find a good way to clamp the sensor after gluing, tape or light spring clamps work well. Once you have a good clamping system worked out mix up some epoxy and glue the sensor in place.
    Another way to mock up the switches is hot glue. But using the double sided tape on the sensor and hot glue or superglue on the magnets isn't what I consider permanent. For me the double sided tape lasted a year.
    Hardware stores usually carry neodymium magnets if replacements are ever required.

  • Headdead
    commented on 's reply
    Yeah, only the 2 front wheels have brakes, and I probably shouldn't mix the levers. I will probably add the hydraulic brake motor cut out cables, or possibly hack a parking brake feature onto the Bafang cables that come with the kit. I need to get the parts before I decide.

  • 73Eldo
    replied
    Looking at the picture it looks like that doesn't have a rear brake and each front has its own lever? That seems like a not very good idea. I thought there was usually a dual cable for the pair of wheels then the other lever did the single..... not that that matters much for this isssue.

    If it is one front wheel each I don't think I would want to mess with changing one lever. The levers being slightly different may effect how they operate and an imbalance between the left and right may be a bad thing. Just the way the levers grip could make a difference as well as their geometry and how much movement causes how much brake movement. I would just get the hydraulic sensors and do both. AZ had a really good point about the parking brake one having a sensor that would disable the throttle when getting on and off. They sell Y cables if your BBS02 doesn't have the gear lead but I thought they started coming that way. Since you were planning to solder anyway you can just make a 3 way if you have to.

    Leave a comment:

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