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    Commuter bike set up

    I would like to have an ebike to:



    go to and from work: 16 miles one way

    Carry 30+ lbs on bike rack + 180 lb me.

    Go 30 mph

    Be able to petal with a medium - fast speed cadence at 30 mph

    ​​​​​​Stop quickly

    Be reliable

    I would like a road bike but feel like I would get too many flat tires and would break spokes. What do you tbink

    Should I get a mtb or a fat bike or road bike ebike

    Should I get a luna kit bike or build my own?

    My budget is 3k approx




    ​​​​

    #2
    i would also be curious for an answer to this question

    would a luna banana ludacrous with a big battery accomplish this?

    im completely new to ebikes and am looking for similar things as coolo

    Comment


      #3

      > go to and from work: 16 miles one way

      Depending on elevation, you'll need a big battery for the round trip. I'd recommend 17.5ah minimum.

      > Carry 30+ lbs on bike rack + 180 lb me.

      I run the Topeak Explorer, which is rated for 55 lbs, but slowly bends with <10lbs on it. So I don't have any good recommendations here.

      > Go 30 mph

      You'll need a BBSHD or Cyclone if you are going mid-drive.

      > Be able to petal with a medium - fast speed cadence at 30 mph

      Front chainring needs to be in the 40's for this to be remotely possible. ​​​​​​

      > Stop quickly

      Use disc brakes.

      > Be reliable

      Buy decent wheels and tires and you'll be fine.

      > I would like a road bike but feel like I would get too many flat tires and would break spokes. What do you tbink

      With 30lbs on the rear, plus a big battery, BBSHD, and your own body, I think you're right. If you buy a quality wheelset, you might be OK. I'll let commuter ebikes chime in on this one.

      > Should I get a mtb or a fat bike or road bike ebike

      This is a matter of preference, what do you think you will ride the most? I have several bikes, and I still struggle with this question like every day, lol.

      > Should I get a luna kit bike or build my own?

      Luna Complete bikes are a really good deal. If I were shopping for a bike right now, I'd probably just buy one of those. And I have built like 4 ebikes. On one hand, building something yourself is extremely gratifying, but on the other hand, having it done professionally is nice too, especially when the cost is around the same as with Luna. Personally, I'd say build your first one, and buy the next one after that. But some people might suggest the reverse, so do what you want, lol. That's what I would do.

      > My budget is 3k approx

      You should be able to get a bike to meet all your needs within budget (or near it :P)

      Comment


        #4
        Any Luna Cycle bike with a bbshd would easily accomplish this and most of them are priced under 3k.

        The Luna Banana would do this as well but it is not the ideal bike for optimal pedaling because of its nonadjustable low seat height.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by WebEsquire View Post
          > go to and from work: 16 miles one way

          Depending on elevation, you'll need a big battery for the round trip. I'd recommend 17.5ah minimum.

          a lot of the 17ah builds have a lower watt output (48w instead of 52w), how does that affect the bike? its only a 4 watt difference so i assume its a minor change but still curious

          Originally posted by Eric Luna View Post
          Any Luna Cycle bike with a bbshd would easily accomplish this and most of them are priced under 3k.

          The Luna Banana would do this as well but it is not the ideal bike for optimal pedaling because of its nonadjustable low seat height.
          the banana looks like so much fun tho, its so tempting, but im 6 2 and it just probably is not practical, still tho, it calls to me lol

          how hard are the bikes to petal if you run out of juice? can you change gears when the battery dies to help petal it home?
          Last edited by adecoy95; 02-20-2017, 05:40 PM.

          Comment


          • Rodney64
            Rodney64 commented
            Editing a comment
            The difference between the 48 and 52 volt packs is 5 more cells in the 52 volt 14s5p pack. This adds a little more range and maybe a little more top speed.

            I haven't ridden the banana, maybe someone who has ridden a banana can comment.

            Yes you can still change gear when the battery is dead. The motor doesn't have any gears as it runs though the bicycles rear cassette.

            THey are still capable of being pedalled no problems. The main thing is get to understand the battery. if you have a 52 volt battery, 58.8 volts if full. 51 in half empty and 45 volts is 10% left. Bit like driving a car, except you do not have a gauge that tells you you have 50 miles left.

            My advice is as soon as a battery gets to 48 volts only use pedelec and no higher that pass level 1. This way you can still limp home.

          #6
          thanks, i appreciate your help figuring this out! its big money for me and i want to make sure i am well informed about what to expect before i commit to a purchase

          why does the racer version of the banana bike claim a 50 mile an hour range with such a smaller battery than the available 17ah one on the normal banana bike?

          also, if i got the racer version would i be able to get it in white? and what effect does using lower watt but higher ah batterys have in that bike?

          Also it says there is only throttle on that bike, does that mean you can't petal with it in any useful way? On the normal version of the banana, does the Ludacris engine version also not have petal assist?
          Last edited by adecoy95; 02-23-2017, 06:49 AM.

          Comment


            #7
            full coverage front and rear fenders you will also need

            Comment


              #8
              Originally posted by Coolo118 View Post
              Carry 30+ lbs on bike rack ...
              ​​​​
              Consider the PDW (Portland Design Works) racks - either will hold that kind of weight.

              https://ridepdw.com/collections/carg...nt=24749204929
              https://ridepdw.com/collections/carg...nt=24750339649

              BBSHD/BBS02B builds: IGH 1 2 3 4 5 6

              Comment


                #9
                As far as the weight is concerned - I commute on a normal human-powered 2011 Felt Z85 road bike, with a custom-fitted rear rack, and a lightweight 20/24-spoke wheelset. I weigh about 215 and routinely carry 10-15 pounds on the rack. In 10,000 miles I've never broken a spoke. I broke one spoke nipple a few months ago but that was it. I run 25c Continental Grand Prix 4 Seasons tires, and have never had a flat out on the road while commuting except this one time I rode on a road shoulder with debris.

                If you run a regular 32 or 36 spoke wheelset I think you'll be fine no matter what you throw at it.

                Comment


                  #10
                  I basically do not understand bicycles. brother usually helped me with the repair of the bike and its purchase. I honestly also thought about buying an electric bicycle and I do not know which one to choose. I now think to choose one of these bikes https://bikesist.com/best-road-bikes-under-1000/ it seems to me that they are good.
                  Last edited by Hahulel; 11-06-2018, 10:21 AM.

                  Comment


                    #11
                    Originally posted by Hahulel View Post
                    I basically do not understand bicycles. brother usually helped me with the repair of the bike and its purchase. I honestly also thought about buying an electric bicycle and I do not know which one to choose.
                    Hi - we may be able to help get you started, if you can give us an idea of what you want to use the bike for (pleasure, getting to work, errands to the store, etc.), and how far you need/want to travel. An idea of the terrain you live in (flat, very hilly, etc.) helps too.

                    Electric bicycles range, unfortunately, from utter junk to intensely overpriced.
                    BBSHD/BBS02B builds: IGH 1 2 3 4 5 6

                    Comment

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