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What fork to buy?

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    What fork to buy?

    I have a Giant mountain bike that I added a 36V 350 Watt 260RPM 100 mm fork size front hub motor (model Q100H) to. Even though I put 1 torque arm on it, the drop outs on the RockShox cracked and broke while I was out riding (fortunately I was just standing back on the pedals after a stop so no bodily harm). Don't want to have that happen again. Can you please recommend the correct fork to purchase.

    #2
    Forget about suspension forks and go for a solid suspension corrected fork.

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      #3
      Right, hub motors and suspension forks don't make a great combination. Too much unsprung weigh, first issue, so the tuning of the damper and spring will not work right, at all. Second issue is torque, which creates a large moment upon the sliding members of the fork, wearing them out, binding, or breaking stuff. (torque twisting fork puts all the load on bushings not capable of that kind of constant loading.

      So sad to destroy such a wonderful fork, but it's not really a suitable combination - front hubs should use beefy solid forks with strong torque-resistance. Steel, which deforms and perhaps cracks with progressive propagation, instead of fatiguing and then cracking all at once as with aluminum, is the preferred material.

      Suspension forks need light wheels to work well.
      Last edited by JPLabs; 01-20-2018, 07:55 AM.
      Fabrication is fun! Build something today. Show someone. Let them help. Inspire and share. Spread the desire.

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        #4
        Like I have posted before, I would not use a suspension fork or rear shock unless it was necessary (MTB, XC, etc.) if for no other reason than the short recommended service intervals (160-220 hours). For a suspension fork, this is about $1 per hour if you hire a shop to perform the maintenance.

        The flip side of this is that suspension forks and rear shocks are amazing!

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          #5
          Originally posted by commuter ebikes View Post
          Like I have posted before, I would not use a suspension fork or rear shock unless it was necessary (MTB, XC, etc.) if for no other reason than the short recommended service intervals (160-220 hours). For a suspension fork, this is about $1 per hour if you hire a shop to perform the maintenance.

          The flip side of this is that suspension forks and rear shocks are amazing!
          I have about 6k miles on a Bluto with no work except keeping the tubes clean and lubed. Still fine. Like new, basically. Even if I throw it away now, that's about 600 hours of use for me. So, a buck an hour. But, it's going to keep going for a while, and a rebuild kit is available.

          Don't let service interval recommendations scare you away, when it comes to suspension.
          Last edited by commuter ebikes; 01-21-2018, 10:10 AM. Reason: Changed "buck a mile" to buck an hour".
          Fabrication is fun! Build something today. Show someone. Let them help. Inspire and share. Spread the desire.

          Comment


          • commuter ebikes
            commuter ebikes commented
            Editing a comment
            I won't argue with success! Maybe the recommended service intervals are set low to increase sales of rebuild kits, to some extent.

            It might also depend on the level of use (e.g. suspension travel, heat, debris) that the fork sees. Maybe the 160 hour figure is more fitting for extreme downhill riders.
            Last edited by commuter ebikes; 01-21-2018, 10:17 AM.
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