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2004 Santa Cruz Blur build

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  • TNC
    replied
    I did another trail ride this morning, and I think this program is pretty well hammered out to my satisfaction on my Nomad. With proper hydro brake sensing and shift sensor, I have excellent control no matter how much power level is selected. That said, the roll into power is very smooth. This was the most annoying feature of this motor on the first real mountain bike ride. You really had to watch your pedal inputs at key times as far as corners, obstacles, etc. The throttle was also twitchy as heck. The overrun, or power after pedaling stopped, was also tricky. Those elements on the pedal assist tab like start current, slow-start, crank trigger, and the others were critical to removing this, and start current was especially critical to the throttle. So far I'm loving this motor application on a mountain bike. I read and heard a lot of negativity as to how this mid-drive kit would be a poor choice for real mountain biking. I'm not seeing that at all. A top drawer factory emtb like a Trek, Specialized, etc. is smoother, but the BBSHD is more than smooth enough once you knock off the rough edges.

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  • DaHose
    replied
    I'm really looking forward to some trail riding soon. I just need to finish my smaller battery build, and then schedule a day to ride with my buddy on his Specialized Levo Turbo. Really interested to see how our two bikes compare, in terms of overall performance.

    Jose

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  • BadBac
    replied
    Originally posted by TNC View Post
    I get to ride factory Trek and Specialized emtb's at the shop I work at. They have torque sensing and are super smooth. While the BBSHD isn't torque sensing, the right programming makes the power delivery amazingly smooth, and the throttle becomes very useable even on a technical trail.
    I can't imagine running my setup without changing the controller settings. It would work, and I'd adapt as well as possible. However, the ability to change these settings is key to a custom ride for sure. I'm in a good place, but I still play around with them a bit just for fun!

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  • TNC
    replied

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  • TNC
    replied
    BadBac, I used an '08 Nomad for my BBSHD install and ran into the same chainline deal you did. That 42T Eclipse is a lifesaver, and because of the motor's power, I found it's not a problem with an 11-50 cassette. I stayed with 9-speed and used one of those newer Box-3 drivetrains which has worked perfectly for this application. It's interesting that you needed to remove material from the pivot area. We both have VPP, but mine had clearance for the install. My frame pivot locations have those covers flush to the face, so that helped. It's funny on the 26" wheel deal on the MTB's when you install a motor. Since we're not solely reliant on our wimpy legs, the enhanced rollover and such with the 27.5 and 29 inch wheels isn't as big a problem when you have strong pedal assist...or a throttle.

    Your comments on the power delivery are fairly spot-on. I programmed mine with a cable and free software download from Luna, and the result has been somewhat amazing. I get to ride factory Trek and Specialized emtb's at the shop I work at. They have torque sensing and are super smooth. While the BBSHD isn't torque sensing, the right programming makes the power delivery amazingly smooth, and the throttle becomes very useable even on a technical trail. I highly recommend the reprogramming. It's really easy with all the info that's out there. I'm betting my program numbers would be very close for you if you're mountain biking on that Blur.

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  • DaHose
    commented on 's reply
    I'd say your guess is on the right track Mike. The older frames work best, because of the geometry too. Current bikes are longer, with way more slack head angles. The older 26" frames seem to have more open triangles, and downtubes with better angles. That lets motors sight higher up and it leaves good battery mounting spaces. Once you add a motor, the biggest benefit of larger wheels (easier rolling over obstacles) is less important, especially if your run full suspension.

  • AZguy
    commented on 's reply
    The organic pads are likely the best at shedding heat but the worst from a wear perspective... if the metallic have those giant heat sinks they could still be pretty darn good

  • 73Eldo
    commented on 's reply
    Interesting that they do a resin with those big heat syncs but I suppose maybe they have some special ingredients to try and make them transfer more heat?

  • BadBac
    commented on 's reply
    Hey AZguy. The pads are a resin (organic) compound. They are very quiet with great feel. I may try the metallic version to compare once I burn through these guys!

  • AZguy
    commented on 's reply
    Those pads are crazy! Look like they'd be good for downhill - what's the pad compound?

  • BadBac
    replied
    Originally posted by ejphotos View Post
    Great looking build BadBac and nice write up!
    These older 26" FS bikes are looking more and more friendly for e conversion...hmmm, decisions decisions lol
    Hey ejphotos, here is a picture of what the brake pads look like outside of the calipers ...

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  • BadBac
    replied
    Originally posted by 73Eldo View Post
    I know an easy way to solve that too much response problem. Beer + potato chips + couch + time. That will mellow out the response of these systems. You add 100 pounds they will feel like a 500w hub motor.
    Ha ha - I'm working on that bit now!

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  • BadBac
    commented on 's reply
    ejphotos: FYI the brakes are newer (2020?) Shimano LX hydraulic discs with resin brake pads. The brake PADS have a heat sync built in. They work great. I have these and a set of Shimano XTs on a couple other bikes.They all work very well.

  • ejphotos
    commented on 's reply
    Which brakes are you using? I can see what looks like a heat sink coming off the pads.

  • Mike_V
    commented on 's reply
    Agreed, Jose
    Why do these designs ~ Mid 2000's ? ~ seem best ?

    Do these resemble motorcycle suspensions with few pivot bearings and;
    is a motorcycle design best for a semi custom conversion mid drive eBike?
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