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Semi vintage bbshd frankenstein hybrid build

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  • Retrorockit
    commented on 's reply
    The short answer is use the front derailer cage for a chain guide.
    Given your skills and how hard it is to get stuff where you are I would usggect going to T-Cycles, and look at their 15t Sport plus idler, and 5 hole idler bracket. The toothed idler turns with the chain so adds no drag when the chain engages in the lower gears. The offset bracket should be easy for you. A pair of 608 bearings and an 8mm bolt for a shaft. It runs smooth on the back of the chain under power.
    With a CNC-machined 7075 aluminum cog and bearing carrier, fiberglass reinforced nylon 6/6 sideplates, and high performance ABEC-7 bearings, the SportPlus Power Idlers from T-Cycle are the sleek, beautiful, light and quiet must-have upgrade for your chainline.

    make a clamp that hangs it to the rear of the chainring TDC. Lower it down until the cogs touch, then raise it up a bit using the seatpost clamp to align it also. I'm hitting all gears full power with a flat 50t ring on an adapter. No Wide narrow either.
    This is also the chain management solution for the Zip tie mod. Which is a separate thing.
    The rear offset on this is about right, the slip joint isn't needed, The offset clamp was useful to me depnding on water bottle bosses or other stuff on the seat post.
    Clamp on Idler Mounts are great for letting you mount idlers where you really want them, and for tensioning timing chains on tandems. If you have a bike/trike where the chainline has just never been right, or you are changing to a hub gear drivetrain, or need to simply and reliably tension a tandem timing chain, or you
    Last edited by Retrorockit; 02-09-2023, 09:24 PM.

  • Maxxim
    replied
    Got the chain guide done. Made a clamp of steel and the guide of polyethylene. The green color isn't nice but maybe paint or some sort of cover could hide it... or I just ignore it.

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  • AZguy
    commented on 's reply
    I had a bike that dropped every other ride and that was with a narrow wide

    Cheap 7sp derailleur not worth upgrading the whole system to get a higher speed clutch derailleur... fabricated a guide that did pretty well - worst thing about is was when I did manage to drop the chain is was a total pain to put back on... I ended up putting a ring guard on each side and "modified" (bent ;-} ) the offending side to a shape that works well and haven't had a drop since... even if it did it would be a breeze to put back on but it has yet to be necessary...

  • Maxxim
    commented on 's reply
    Yea, it is a narrow-wide ring. I may fabricate a guide, lets see...

  • AZguy
    commented on 's reply
    If you aren't already using a narrow-wide ring that will often solve chain drops from the ring - did on two of my bikes that had horrible chain drop issues

    If a narrow-wide won't do it you may need to look at chain guides... sometimes possible to get the same accomplished with ring guards

    A clutch type derailleur also helps

  • Maxxim
    replied
    Something small done today. Fitted the speed sensor and magnet. Very close call as there wasn't much room for the sensor, and I didn't want to put it on the chain side. Maybe one mm clearance between the sensor and magnet.

    My friends was little bit suspicious about it, but happy in the end after all. :)

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    Fitted also a new chain and had a look at the chain line. Stright line goes to the 5-6 gears. First gear is quite off, 8th is'n so bad. Very difficult to get it visible in the pics. When shifting from first to second the chain easily jumps off the front chainring, so I have to add a chain guide there. Couldn't use the orginal front derailleur as there wasn't space for the mounting bracket with the motor in place.

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  • AZguy
    commented on 's reply
    Dynamic and unpredictable in my riding world is when out in the backcountry and it is plenty of both =]

    Urban riding out here for me is mostly limited to the multi-use trails and that's pretty much neither for the most part... still plenty of fun and it's amazing how much of it there is and how far you can go... right out of my back yard (either my house or shop) is hundreds of miles of contiguous dedicated multi-use right in the middle of all this PHX metro area urbanity

    We're planning a ride from the Tempe Town Lake along the Snotsdale green belt (so nice, all the street crossings are tunnels that have the dual use of flood drainage when we get the monsoon storms) up to the Arizona canal with a visit to the Arizona Falls ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arizona_Falls ) which are cool in a cool sort of way - you can ride under and over the falls for some evaporative cooling in the hot dry air, and then down the cross cut canal through Papago Park next to the botanical gardens and the zoo - will hit a brewery or two along the route and maybe ride through the middle of the snotsdale civic center mall... these routes are usually not terribly crowded but not going to try during this stupid game and golf thing that are in town (yuck!)

  • Retrorockit
    commented on 's reply
    Even among street riders my bike is probably under 1%. I wouldn't be surprised if it's unique. MTB guys pushed a lot of good street stuff out of the market. Now that Ebikes are getting big I think some of it needs to come back. Rapid Rise (LO Normal derailer) Gripshifters, and Front Freewheel setup are all working great for me. In fact they complement each other. I'm not going to say my cable disc brakes are "better" than 4 piston hydros. But they're sure as hell reliable no matter what. I like that in brakes.The performance is more than adequate if you set them up properly..At least the Avid BB7s are.

  • Retrorockit
    commented on 's reply
    I'm pretty sure riding in Finland doesn't bear much resemblance to what I do. So my setup probably isn't what's needed. For some momentary situation I will use the brake witches to cut power. Especially in tight spots where taking time to push a button twice isn't ideal. To call where I ride dynamic and unpredictable would probably be an understatement.Only sometimes, and only in some places. But it can get real.

  • AZguy
    commented on 's reply
    Hahaha - hardly... to be honest was was thinking of the commuters in china on the $500 DD rear hub bikes... they are likely better off with the brake sensors

    Yes I like the triggers [that 95+% of MTB guys prefer] and the shift sensors work great for me [like so many others] since I expect a brief break in the power delivery when shifting [just like normal pedaling], and it's quite short, at least with my BBS "tune"

    Hate the brake sensors passionately since I want to throttle and brake simultaneously and no delay in acceleration when on throttle like the brake sensors do

    We ride different places, styles, bikes etc.... different "missions" for sure which require different equipment, different setups...and pretty sure you know I'm not a one-size-fits-all... do what works for you ;-}

  • Retrorockit
    commented on 's reply
    "Simple commuter street bike for inexperienced riders" You don't mean me do you? I run the brake switches for close quarter urban work I drag a brake so I don't get power surges maneuvering through construction barricades, or around pedestrians.. AZ and I always say the opposite things about bike setup. He runs shift sensors, I can't have the delay in acceleration. Just about every control on our bikes is in a different place. He's trigger shifter, I never could stand the damned things.

  • AZguy
    commented on 's reply
    I think that's a really good decision - see if you find a reason to put them on before going to the effort... pretty much anyone that's fussed with the magnetic won't say they're easy although some are far more difficult than others and on my brakes with nothing really flat to mount them on it was nothing but headaches... some it's pretty much just outright impossible... not really sure why I put them on in the first place... just seemed like I was "supposed" to... but that's not really a good reason LOL

  • Maxxim
    commented on 's reply
    That makes sense. I may try without them then and hopefully stay alive. :D Would also be easier to keep a clean look with less wires.

  • AZguy
    commented on 's reply
    FWIW I did all kinds of gyrations gluing the sensors to the brakes... after a few months figured out that I really wanted to be able to put a tiny amount of throttle in while applying brakes, got rid of them and have been much happier... In hindsight I can't really figure out much of any good purpose for them and even without all the difficulty with the magnetic sensors (they are really a pain to get right and will still likely get bumped off with anything short of structural epoxy) they don't provide any real benefit and for me at least provide more negative than value... Maybe on a simple commuter street bike for inexperienced riders but even then I dunno... I've spent a lot of time on motos and for really precise control there are a lot of times when having both brake and throttle are very valuable... YMMV

  • Maxxim
    commented on 's reply
    Half twist could be good, but I will test this out first. It may be ok as it is.

    Left shift triggers on the top of the bar is also problematic as I have the 500c display that sitts just there, otherwise that would be a great solution.

    One thing still to do with the brakes are to fit the magnetic brake sensors. Don't want to do any ugly glue-mess install, they also have to be properly secured in place...
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