Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

rear hub, internal gear options.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    rear hub, internal gear options.

    I'm not sure which forum this should go in....

    My son was riding my eBike, Motobecane 29+ with BBSHD, and somehow the chain derailed off the top of the cassette. Got stuck between the cassette and hub, locked up, and completely tore up the derailleur (SRAM X5). I do not know if the derailleur is even repairable. It's pretty bent up.

    I'd like to know what options are out there for a complete transmission upgrade. I don't know a lot about bikes, but I seem to remember a couple options for completely removing the cassette/derailleur and putting on a hub with internal gearing.

    Can anyone point me in the right direction for this?

    Thanks,
    Kent

    #2
    I have no personal experience with IGHs but lust after one for my Dolomite build. I find terrific info right here on the Knowledge Base and Articles Tabs of the forum.
    http://www.electricbike.com/mid-drive-kit-igh/

    Comment


      #3
      Currently, I am riding a Shimano Nexus 8 IGH with a BBSHD. I have had 150 trouble free miles, so far. I like it. Being able to shift into any gear at a stop is nice.

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by ocezam View Post
        I'm not sure which forum this should go in....

        My son was riding my eBike, Motobecane 29+ with BBSHD, and somehow the chain derailed off the top of the cassette. Got stuck between the cassette and hub, locked up, and completely tore up the derailleur (SRAM X5). I do not know if the derailleur is even repairable. It's pretty bent up.

        I'd like to know what options are out there for a complete transmission upgrade. I don't know a lot about bikes, but I seem to remember a couple options for completely removing the cassette/derailleur and putting on a hub with internal gearing.

        Can anyone point me in the right direction for this?

        Thanks,
        Kent
        I am looking into IGH (Integrated Gear Hub) and CVT (Continuously Variable Transmission) hubs also as a viable option with the BBSHD.

        What got me interested in this is a build by poster ZeroGravity found here:
        http://electricbike.com/forum/forum/...-commuter-bike

        ZeroGravity's build using the N360 CVT hub seems good if your willing to back off on the power while shifting. As you cannot shift the CVT under power. And I'm not sure he has an obstacle in his path like I have (more on this below)

        In ZeroGravity's thread he mentions a guy named Karl (electricbike-blog.com) . Go there for sure and read up on his builds and experience with these types of shifting hubs. He covers the CVT's and Nexus pretty good and rides them hard.

        The obstacle I want to conquer...The hill that leads up to my house....An 800 ft rise in 1.18 miles (I'm assuming 13% grade or more at times over a 1.18 mile distance) .

        So I'm trying to figure out how to do this best with a BBSHD and one of these hubs.

        But my suggestion is to do some reading up over at Karl's blog

        I emailed Luna about this and they suggested a Rohloff as being the strongest and having the best range. But price wise I'm not sure this is the way to go. But Luna suggested this hub in a recent email to me.

        Comment


          #5
          I had a bad chain line that I was unable to resolve on a BBSHD with Luna 42T ring (consistently missed front sprocket hook-up in any gear above 3rd). Several recommended switching to Lekkie Bling but at $90. & a backlog, I opted not to throw good money after bad and switched over to a Shram G8. Over 200 mixed riding miles, I don't regret the decision but with a couple caveats.

          These are only my personal thoughts/experiences, every build and experience is different. I find the Shram G8 without assist to be even smoother and more user friendly than a high mid-range quality derailleur set up. Once assist is engaged I find the IGH much more finicky whether shifting up or down (yes, I know how to shift under stress) but I don't run a shift sensor. On the flats or downhill it's not an issue but on long climbs and/or technical off road it creates issues. I also question the durability of this particular IGH under load.

          Conclusion; 1. shift sensor may be a big benefit for an IGH. 2. For tarmac or single track, as long as you aren't constantly having to switch gears I highly recommend. 3. I'm not convinced of durability under excessive load. 4. Derailleurs are relatively cheap but need constant attention and under heavy use need to be replaced somewhat often. IGH's are expensive but as long as they aren't abused (like assisted by a BBHSD or worse a Cyclone and/or shifting under load), they need little in maintenance, should pay for themselves in outlasting derailleurs, and will cure most chain line issues.
          Last edited by tonk; 09-09-2016, 09:18 AM.

          Comment


            #6
            Keep in mind with a BBSHD (and 52v battery) you will really only need 2 gears. Steep hills, and everything else in my experience. I don't find the need to shift alot. I am 215 pounds and 6'2" and that motor covers quite a bit of ground with torgue.
            http://electricbike.com/forum/forum/...-disc-fsr-2005

            Comment


              #7
              and don't forget the shimano nexus 3 speed is only around $100 and karl notes how robust they are. given the choice i'd opt for 3 speed bulletproof versus 8 speed and fragile

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by limhrod View Post
                and don't forget the shimano nexus 3 speed is only around $100 and karl notes how robust they are. given the choice i'd opt for 3 speed bulletproof versus 8 speed and fragile
                Is the Nexus 3 speed Disc Brake compatible?
                http://electricbike.com/forum/forum/...-disc-fsr-2005

                Comment


                  #9
                  Shimano Nexus Inter-3 Disc Brake Hub SG-3D55 32h 135mm niagara cycle gets them to your door for under $90

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by FolsomRider View Post
                    Keep in mind with a BBSHD (and 52v battery) you will really only need 2 gears. Steep hills, and everything else in my experience. I don't find the need to shift alot. I am 215 pounds and 6'2" and that motor covers quite a bit of ground with torgue.
                    For those that ride in assist most of the time this is true, but for technical off-road or if you spend a decent amount of your ride time without assist then the gears become necessary especially in mountain terrain. I may be in the minority for riding style but I try to use the assist only when necessary. For the record I tried a 3speed & it didn't work out for me but for the vast majority , as FolsomRider states, it would be perfect.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by FolsomRider View Post

                      Is the Nexus 3 speed Disc Brake compatible?
                      Yes. Here it is on Amazon. But you need to buy the disc...and the shifter, both are not included for this price
                      https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002P6V2MC

                      Comment


                        #12
                        When I ordered my Motobecane Cafe Express 8 online, it came with a Shimano Nexus 8 IGH. I road this bike for a couple of years and never had any issue except it pedaled a bit harder then my other derailleur bike did. Reason for buying this bike at all was to get out of a derailleur bike as I love breaking derailleurs for some reason -- Maybe because I am big and pedal hard, HA! Anyways not had any issues to speak of and it is very nice to shift IGH, running or stopped.

                        Electrified this bike a few weeks back with the BBSHD kit from Luna Cycle and it only got better. Took a week or more before I decided to install the gear sensor that I had ordered with the kit, but when I did finally install it, again, it only got better. Now I have what I have been telling others, "an automatic" shifter as it feels like what an automatic transmission feels like when shifting gears. Work quite nice, but still have a bit of "hard shift" on occasion and a bit of a problem at times downshifting. In every case it's because of the road conditions (uphill mostly) and my need to keep pumping harder then optimal during a shift. Most of the time, it "just works" and there have not been any real side effects I have seen with the "clunks" I sometimes get when pedaling hard during a shift up a hill.

                        Was interested in the Nu Vinci, but I really don't think it would suit me to have to let off the throttle while shifting as this is the very reason I finally decided to install the gear sensor.

                        As to a 3 speed, that would work even less well, as I am setting this bike up to pull a 100 lb loaded BOB trailer and will have 450 lbs. on the bike itself, so I need all of my gears. Also, even empty, the higher the gear jump the more battery it takes to get up to speed in that gear. So, you would have to see a greater drain on a 3 speed hub, verses an 8 speed, everything else being equal.

                        -Rodger

                        Comment


                          #13
                          makes sense to use that many gears if you are loading so many pounds-but then again, i would think it would call for the strongest solution (the 3 speed?). glad to hear that its robust enough for the kind of cycle camping you are doing

                          Comment


                            #14
                            I realize most don't consider the Rohloff because of it's cost, but when I hear that "you only need 3 speeds," I have to chime in.

                            True, the torquey BBSHD can make it work just fine, but the main reason I got a Rohloff was NOT for the 14 gears, but for the extremely wide range from low to high. Just a few hours ago in fact I had reason to re-appreciate this yet again. I had spent the night in a small town, 5 miles down a dead straight and level road from the airport, where my plane was. Pulling my Travoy trailer with 6 gallons of gas loaded on it for the plane, plus some other stuff, and still pretty dusky, so I really wanted to minimize my time on the no bike path or shoulder road. No lights or even rear reflector! I just stopped and got clear off the road when the 3 cars came by me, but the rest of the time it was great to be able to easily cruise in the mid 20's. I could have gone faster, over 30, but I was thinking of my amp draw of course.

                            2 hrs later, and 80 miles away, I got the bike out again and on the spur of the moment decided to see where a trail ended that started by where I had just landed, in a big remote valley with 12 K mountains surrounding it. I followed the trail for 4.5 miles, gaining a bunch of altitude also. The last 1/4 mile was so steep I was having a real hard time keeping the front tire down and not breaking the rear tire loose. So steep, I walked it back down on my return, finding it hard to believe i was able to ride up it! Point being, I had the very low gearing needed for as extreme as trail riding as it gets, but still have the 35+mph top speed. I am super happy with the Rohloff, it is all they say it is.

                            Comment


                            • marjamar
                              marjamar commented
                              Editing a comment
                              Just can't spend that kinda money on a IGH. Other than price, heard nothing but good things about the Rohloff.

                              -Rodger

                            #15
                            Just for the record, inside the Rohloff is a close-ratio 7-speed, alongside a wide-ratio 2-speed, and 8th gear has the most efficiency, with least friction. All German case-hardened steel, much stronger than human legs could possibly stress it. Intended to be a lifetime purchase, then passed on to the kids...
                            Last edited by spinningmagnets; 09-13-2016, 03:22 PM. Reason: speling

                            Comment


                            • g725s
                              g725s commented
                              Editing a comment
                              Originally posted by spinningmagnets View Post
                              Just for the record, inside the Rohloff is a close-ratio 2-speed, alongside a wide-ratio 2-speed, and 8th gear has the most efficiency, with least friction. All German case-hardened steel, much stronger than human legs could possibly stress it. Intended to be a lifetime purchase, then passed on to the kids...
                              It might even make you feel like a kid too ;-)  I want one...
                          Working...
                          X