Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Converting a 27.5 Pitch Expert to an E-bike, requires your help!

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Converting a 27.5 Pitch Expert to an E-bike, requires your help!

    Hi,

    I’m new to the world of E-bikes and I want to make my own with a mountain bike that I already have. I currently have a 27.5 Specialized Pitch Expert and I’m wondering where to start in terms of choosing the parts. I have a basic amount of knowledge such as you need a motor, controller, battery, etc., but I get confused on choosing the right parts in terms of compatibility which will be explained down below. Also, 27.5" motors seem to be hard to find? A lot of the ones I’m finding are 26"

    Here is a link to the specs of the bike I have: https://www.specialized.com/us/en/me...-27-5/p/129308

    Minimum specs I’m looking for:
    • 750w-1000w
    • 48v
    • 27.5 rims
    • Rear wheel motor
    • 7 or 9 gears (the bike I have has a 9-speed cassette. Will a 7-speed cassette/freewheel work as well? Compatibility issues if I use a 7-speed freewheel on a 9-speed bike, besides of course resetting the limiter screws on the rear derailer?)
    • Freewheel or free-hub (preferably the latter as I heard they're more durable?)
    • I’m in the USA, but totally okay with my bike going faster :)

    I’m looking for a “cheap” setup (all in <$650). The more inexpensive the better. So if you have any part recommendations and or links to parts please let me know. For the most part, I’m pretty handy and can figure things out and am reasonably knowledgable about bikes. Any help would be much appreciated. Been trying to get this project off the ground for a while, but it hasn’t gone really anywhere yet. I’ve looked on Alibaba and Ali-express for parts before as well as they seem to be pretty cheap, thoughthe quality is also important as well.

    Thank you for your help,
    Michael

  • HIGHVOLTAGE
    commented on 's reply
    Even with a lock, your battery is not as secure as you think. You can buy any size of bolt cutters or even a wireless angle grinder at Home Depot and carry them with you to break through practically any lock that isn't 18mm thick in less than 10 seconds. If a thief wants your battery, he's going to take it, no matter what lock you put on it.

    Watch this video to see how easy they can do it.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pywN558dJaU
    Last edited by HIGHVOLTAGE; 05-15-2019, 10:03 AM.

  • jradi
    replied
    Unfortunately, the Wolfpack battery is not lockable. I have the kevlar strap and it's useless. If you look at the picture on their website, you just need to slip the strap up and over the battery and you can pull the battery right off. There needs to be some sort of a slot in the battery that the strap threads through. I'm currently trying to figure out how to modify the battery or my bike to accomodate such a thing. Otherwise, I'm kind of nervous about someone stealing my $600 battery, that's secured with nothing but magnets...

    https://lunacycle.com/ottolock-kevlar-strap-lock/

    Leave a comment:


  • ManaCycle
    replied
    You can buy a separate Kevlar lock for the Wolfpack from Luna. Battery attached with magnets to bottle cage bolts and locked around downtube with Kevlar strap. Awesome battery, feels heavy duty compared to cheap plastic housing on others and made in USA.

    Leave a comment:


  • Defjr333
    replied
    I hear that AZguy. A simple flathead screw driver can pry the soft aluminum from the screws/ bolts in under a second. So they get your battery AND the mount. Since my new build has 2 Panasonic 52v 12.5ah battery packs($1200+ invested!) I want to be SURE nobody can get them easily. Thankfully my tank is large enough for both to fit inside plus all my other electronic stuff, with room to spare for ventilation. The batteries have to be installed in the tank before the tank is mounted into the frame or they do not go in/out....no room. In addition to that I have a motorcycle alarm system being installed too. I think I have done all I can to protect mine.

    Leave a comment:


  • AZguy
    replied
    The locks only stop the honest - it's extremely easy to steal a battery even with the locks

    I'm not looking forward to the day when battery theft becomes a problem and we've got to carry them in wherever we go - I could steal the one with a lock in less time than it take to unlock them and remove them properly

    Leave a comment:


  • Jyang3153
    replied
    Originally posted by Defjr333 View Post
    Since the wolf states if you need 50+ amps continuous often (throttle junkie-see me) choose the 30q model. That leads me to believe the Panasonic would be better for high amperage use. I chose it not only for the 50+ amp BMS but because it is installed inside a metal tank and easier to fit in there. NOTHING is free. So built into that wolf price is the housing case and mount. The Panasonic is just wrapped in thick heatshrink with plastic under. So 99.9% of the cost/ price are the batteries and BMS.

    is the wolf battery lockable to the frame? I believe the Panasonic one is, but from what i understand the wolf one attaches via magnets?

    Leave a comment:


  • Defjr333
    replied
    Since the wolf states if you need 50+ amps continuous often (throttle junkie-see me) choose the 30q model. That leads me to believe the Panasonic would be better for high amperage use. I chose it not only for the 50+ amp BMS but because it is installed inside a metal tank and easier to fit in there. NOTHING is free. So built into that wolf price is the housing case and mount. The Panasonic is just wrapped in thick heatshrink with plastic under. So 99.9% of the cost/ price are the batteries and BMS.
    Last edited by Defjr333; 05-13-2019, 08:38 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Defjr333
    commented on 's reply
    You dont HAVE to get one with as many ah/ watt hours. I wanted performance(+50 continuous) AND endurance (ah/ watt hours)

  • Jyang3153
    replied
    I was checking out Lunacycle do you think it makes a huge difference between the 52v Wolfpack versus the 52v Panasonic battery pack. Both look similar to me, a layperson. Any significant difference that would cause you to spend 100$ more.

    Leave a comment:


  • AZguy
    replied
    It's an investment - my batteries were all less than $600 but some not by much... OTOH even my oldest cheapest ones have seen thousands of miles over the three years I've been in the electric scene so if I count on another couple of years and another few thousand miles the annual cost and per mile cost isn't bad at all

    Paying even ~$100/yr for a box that holds a ton of electrons seems a good investment to me! =]

    Paying less, you will get less - seen plenty of folks trying to cut big corners on batteries and it never seems to look like a practical or worthwhile effort to me

    Click image for larger version  Name:	ricky.gif Views:	31 Size:	1.3 KB ID:	86421

    Leave a comment:


  • Jyang3153
    replied
    yeah, I'm definitely going to have to increase the budget, but dang 600$ for the battery pack alone? Thank you guys for all your input!

    Leave a comment:


  • Defjr333
    replied
    These guys are telling you straight. I have a Luna BBSHD on my bike and a friend wanted to build one similar. He purchased his from a Chinese company for about $150 less than I paid. BUT, he has TONS of issues. The battery pack quality of cells are junk, his controller does not allow 52v (58.8 charged), only a max of 54v for some reason(higher than that and he gets an error code). Bafang also had a defect on an internal part, and mine broke. A Luna employee saw me asking on this site for recommendations on who to buy a replacement from, and he informed me of the defect and sent the part out THAT DAY FREE! So I would also say, 1 stick with Luna or at least a highly respected company. 2 Go mid drive unless you are thinking of a QS hub motor(10k watts+). 3 Read, Read, and read some more, then do what is best for YOU. Lastly, be a little more flexible with you prices. Depending on the range you require, a good battery pack can cost as much as you are stating for your entire build. My Pack was near $600 with tax and shipping. That is just the battery pack, the BBSHD kit was around $650. If you put some pics of the bike up, people will help out with recommendations and ideas to help along.

    Leave a comment:


  • AZguy
    replied
    The BBSHD is likely the most compatible, easy to install and reasonably reliable approach to a RYO mid-drive and it's very configurable (get a programming cable!)...

    Leave a comment:


  • ManaCycle
    replied
    Oh and I went with the 32 t mini ring. Lost about 3 mph on the top end but much better torque and performance. Also more reliable in regular riding conditions. If you get the kit you can have both and try out different sizes.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X