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THE 6000w+ E BIKE PARTS HAVE ARRIVED

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    THE 6000w+ E BIKE PARTS HAVE ARRIVED

    Guys if you have saw my other posts you would know that I've been serious about building a (fast) bike for daily commuting. And so I wanted a bike that was fast, looked good and was capable of doing the job of daily commuting. And so I ordered the enduro frame, with a 5000w hub motor I'm pretty sure that's rated power, as well as a controller rated at a peak of 80amps if I'm not mistaken, and a 72v 26amp battery mounted on 19" moto rims. I'm going to attach the pictures of the parts scattered so you can see what it looks like. I'm waiting on about two more parts to come in and then I will start the build. I haven't ridden the bike yet obviously, however I'm already thinking of making upgrades lol. Since you guys have more experience and knowledge than me in this, give me a heads up of what to expect speed wise and so forth, and if there is any highly recommended performance upgrade that I should make as it sits let me know. I'm most likely going to be upgrading parts here and there in the future like brakes and so on but as it is I think I should be satisfied for a bit. I don't how how to upload a photo on the forum it's being really annoying so I'm going to add the links, tell me if you can't see them.





    #2
    That sure looks like a 50mm magnet motor to me. That is what I have on all four of my ebikes. In practice, you may start to have some heat issues at a continuous power output above 4000W, but I never need that type of power even with my very heavy load and tires.

    How many FETs are in your controller? I use a 24 FET Lyen Mark 2 controller optimized for 72V (it uses 4110 FETs). My fully charged battery is 83.9V and I run it down to 67V most of the time. Hot off the charger, the voltage sag will have you at 79V as soon as you ride the bike for a few seconds.

    I can get up to 46 mph on 31.5" diameter tires, but I limit the current to a max of 32A so that I can have a safe journey. My power consumption cruising at 34 mph is about 2200W. The motor never gets hot.

    I don't like to ride a bike above about 38 mph, but that is me. My bike has no suspension. Be sure to be outfitted like a motorcyclist at speeds above 40 mph. Think through what might happen if you go down. Your momentum will dictate the direction you fly so make sure and have on the full face helmet, gloves, leather jacket, etc.
    Last edited by commuter ebikes; 04-30-2017, 02:21 PM.

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    • Electricbiker100
      Electricbiker100 commented
      Editing a comment
      Hey this is the exact kit I got



      So it's 24 fets. I agree with what you are saying with regards to safety, I don't plan on riding like a idiot and flooring it around all day. However I like to have the power available when I want it or need it. That being said, if I wanted more power by adding another battery, my motor should be able to handle it but the controller will probably need an upgrade correct? Im looking to get it running at any where from 90-100v for a good amount of power. I don't know the complete details on the controller and motor, should I ask the seller about the details? If so what exactly should I ask him about the motor and controller which I would need to know just in case I upgrade for more power?

    #3
    The link says that it is a 72V controller, which I will take to mean that it is optimized for 72V, just like all of my controllers. So I'm sure you will use a 72V battery. If you wanted to use a higher voltage battery, you probably would have chosen a different controller.

    A 96V battery would damage your FETs because the fully charged voltage of a 96V battery is around 111V which is higher than the maximum voltage rating for a 4110 MOSFET. People use 4115 MOSFETs for the higher voltage (freeway) applications.

    72V ought to be enough for you, but you could explore using a battery with slightly higher voltage, but I wouldn't recommend that because your controller is probably engineered to operate best with a 72V battery. Like I said, a 72V battery is 83.9V hot off the charger going down to 64V when you are at the end of your range.

    If you got a higher capacity battery (e.g. a 26Ah battery rather than a 20Ah battery), that would extend your range (of course) as well as enable you to draw more current because you have more cells to draw from.

    It is a very good thing that you have a 24 FET controller because it is less likely than an 18 FET controller to have a heat issue.

    You are all set up to have a bike that can provide a lot of torque and speed. Make you you use a quality battery and a BMS rated to handle current levels above what you would ever draw.

    The 50mm motor and 24 FET controller are possibly overbuilt for the riding that you usually do, so they will stay on the cool side and not be stretched to their limits. That way, they will last a long time. And if you feel like going up a steep hill, hauling a lot of weight at high speed or accelerating a great deal from time to time, the components can handle it.

    The components above are not immune from heat issues, however. If you tried to accelerate a heavy load up a long, very steep hill to a sustained high cruising speed, you might want to look at your motor temp.
    Last edited by commuter ebikes; 04-30-2017, 06:27 PM.

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    • Electricbiker100
      Electricbiker100 commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks, that answers allot of my questions, like I said I haven't yet ridden it to know how fast it is, I'll keep you updated when I do. THE display that comes with it also acts like a controller and allows me to adjust several things like speed level, motor levels, torque and so on. It also tells me my motor temperature, if I have questions about that I'll ask you. I'm curious at what temperature would it be considered overheating with the motor?

    #4
    Anything over 90 degrees Celsius should grab your attention. At 100 degrees C, start to think about either slowing way down or taking a break. At 107 C, pull 'er over and take a break.

    At 130 C, the magnets may start to demagnetize and other permanent damage may occur (such as the laminations being compromised). At 150 C, your display will probably shut off your voltage temporarily.

    I have a Cycle Analyst V3, and I have had the motor temp up to 150 C whereupon the CA shut me down (my friend was riding it that time and not watching the temperature gauge). No damage occurred as a result of that incident.

    BTW the LVC in my controller is 56V, and the LVC in my CA (which I set) is 65V.
    Last edited by commuter ebikes; 04-30-2017, 07:17 PM.

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    • Electricbiker100
      Electricbiker100 commented
      Editing a comment
      Great thank you, now I'll make sure to keep an eye on that
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