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BBSHD - 2020 Motobecane Sturgis Bullet

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    BBSHD - 2020 Motobecane Sturgis Bullet

    This is my second ebike build. The first bike I built up was a Framed MN 2.0 that I purchased for winter trail riding up here in MN. I was so happy with how that bike turned out, but I quickly realized that I needed a bike with a suspension fork so I picked up this Motobecane with the Rockshox Bluto fork from Bikes Direct. When I received the bike, I was very impressed with the quality and looks of it. I have a BBSHD with a 52V 14A battery which has turned out to be way overkill for me. I don't think I have ever used half of the battery in one ride so I'm interested in getting something smaller and more light weight.

    Here is the bike after I initially put it together (before installing the motor). Please excuse my cluttered garage in the pics.



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    Unfortunately I ran into some challenges during the install that I didn't experience with my last bike, and I was very impatient to get it built up so I just charged ahead without doing any research. I had clearance issues with the front derailer mount, and the motor also interfered with the rear swingarm / frame. The front derailer mount I just grinded off, no big deal. The swing arm clearance issue was not as easy. I didn't think about using spacers, and thought I could just grind some clearance out of the BBSHD in that area, which I did. I then painted it. Even after the added clearance, it was still touching the frame so I ended up purchasing some spacers from Luna. I installed one spacer and some corresponding washers the same thickness in between the bracket and motor.

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    After that it was time to finish up the build, including installing the gear sensor (this frame has internal cable routing), brake sensor, and installing the battery mount. I use a frame bag to help cover up the battery and give it a more discrete look.

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    I used 3M double stick tape for the brake sensor. The placement is tough on this one as there is not enough clearance in between the lever and the housing for the metal ring.

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    Chain line:

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    And the final product:





    #2
    And the final product:

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    Comment


      #3
      I'm super happy with this bike. I used to have nothing fun to do in the winter, but now I look forward to getting this out on the trails every weekend. I tried messing with the programming a bit, but found I really like most of the stock settings so far. I tried the "limitless" settings, but didn't like how the power decreased so much when pedaling cadence slowed as you come up to hills causing you to have to shift much more.

      Yesterday the motor came loose on me unfortunately and did a little bit of damage to the bottom bracket. I ended up cutting gasket out of a rubber garage door seal and used that in between where the motor bracket gets tightened up against the bottom bracket in hopes that this would add some protection to the frame and more friction (which I didn't take a picture of before re-assembling). I made corresponding washers to space in between the motor and mount bracket. I also ordered one of those aluminum motor mount stabilizers from Luna that I will install to ensure it never comes loose and moves on me again.

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      Comment


        #4
        Thanks for posting. So, would you say the build up is pretty straightforward if you had used spacers to begin with? I was looking at this bike to build up as well. Also what size BB on the motor did you buy and what size frame?
        Thanks!

        Comment


          #5
          I think you would have to mill a little bit off the front derailleur mount at least otherwise you would have to use too many spacers , but that's not a big deal. I have the 100mm bbshd and the bike frame is a medium. You definitely won't be disssponited in this bike. It's a great value.

          Comment


            #6
            Looks like you went with the 32t Lekkie. I have also and I cannot get my lowest couple of gears. Have you had similar problems. The chain stays flare out so quickly the 42t won’t fit.

            Comment


            • 73Eldo
              73Eldo commented
              Editing a comment
              That is a common problem with fat bikes and made worse with lower end ones that don't use especially wide rear hubs. Fat bikes got popular when 1x drives were popular so most of them are designed for 1x's and were usually around a 30t at the largest so no there was no consideration at all for room for anything larger to clear so we can't use the larger offset rings to get the chain line back.

              Some of the better fat bikes use a 177 or 197 rear hubs so there is a little more room to work with. Cheap ones try to get by with a 150 where there just isn't any room to spare.
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