Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Frame building shop tools

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • commuter ebikes
    replied
    I will not be welding any aluminum or Ti. I plan on only using 4130 Chromoly.

    I will know more after I take the framebuilding classes in April, but I don't even know why I would need a mill. I also don't even know if I will need a lathe. Good thing I am taking the classes.

    I can see that the Anvil order will be a financial apocalypse. I plan on getting the following:

    Journeyman frame fixture (jig) (http://www.anvilbikes.com/portfolio-item/t4/ or http://www.anvilbikes.com/portfolio-item/t3/),

    Universal tube holder (http://www.anvilbikes.com/portfolio-item/uth/),

    head tube pucks,

    bottom bracket adapters,

    main tube metering fixture (http://www.anvilbikes.com/portfolio-...orizontal-mtm/ or http://www.anvilbikes.com/portfolio-...ering-fixture/),

    seat stay metering fixture (http://www.anvilbikes.com/portfolio-...ering-fixture/),

    chain stay metering fixture (http://www.anvilbikes.com/portfolio-...ering-fixture/),

    tubing bender (http://www.anvilbikes.com/portfolio-...ing-rodriguez/), and

    iso mount front and rear disc brake tab fixtures (pictured below).

    Just the Anvil order will have me working nose to the grindstone for at least two years, making sure not to spend money on anything else.

    It would seem the first step in this process is just to work and save. I already told my boss to max out my OT for the next three years.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	feng-shui-400.jpg Views:	1 Size:	35.6 KB ID:	54042Click image for larger version  Name:	phrunt-shui-400.jpg Views:	1 Size:	38.7 KB ID:	54043
    Last edited by commuter ebikes; 12-25-2017, 07:24 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • NOBLNG
    replied
    Originally posted by NOBLNG View Post

    A high frequency machine would be nice since you do not need to ever touch the work with the electrode, plus you can weld aluminum. If you think you might want to do aluminum in the future, get a hi-fi.
    Actually that STH machine with hi-fi in the above link will NOT do aluminum as it is DC only. You need a machine with AC output to do aluminum

    Leave a comment:


  • calfee20
    replied
    I have a Miller Mig 185 and it runs fine on 30/220.
    Last edited by commuter ebikes; 12-31-2017, 12:39 PM. Reason: I changed "Ming" to "Mig".

    Leave a comment:


  • ykick
    replied
    50A would be nice but most likely 30A will be easiest. 30A 220V is still 4x power Watts as 15A 110V.

    Leave a comment:


  • commuter ebikes
    replied
    My Dad is a retired electrician & he is coming out tomorrow to put 220V in the garage. He said it will cost about $200-$300. Does anybody know how much current I might need? I think the house now has two 50A breakers.

    I already have a good 110V drill press & cutoff saw.

    Leave a comment:


  • commuter ebikes
    replied
    Thanks for all the helpful responses. I sent an inquiry about getting 220V in the garage.
    Last edited by commuter ebikes; 12-25-2017, 03:20 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • NOBLNG
    replied
    Originally posted by commuter ebikes View Post
    I wonder if this welder would be enough: https://www.millerwelds.com/equipmen...welders-m30132
    I think that welder would be fine for your use. I have a 150 STL and it has plenty of power even on 110v to do thin wall tubing. It can also be used on 220v when or if you ever get the power. It has arc on lift feature which means you touch the tungsten to the work and the machine turns on the gas and then the current when you lift off. A high frequency machine would be nice since you do not need to ever touch the work with the electrode, plus you can weld aluminum. If you think you might want to do aluminum in the future, get a hi-fi. If you don't, I would not bother. Definitely invest in the foot pedal remote.

    Leave a comment:


  • JPLabs
    replied
    I tend to agree with 220V equipment but you can get away with 110V for most things. I have a 110V lathe, bandsaw, planer, edger, grinders, drill press, and such which work fine for light work, and I used to survive with a 110v compressor and arc welder. The 110 compressor is iffy for any air tool use, just not real efficient.

    Welding on 110V was very limiting. Welders designed for 110 were not very high end. Maybe that changed in the last 20 years, since I upgraded.

    You might consider a nice used generator you can make quiet, invest in that while you live where you do now, and just use for welding, or for any tools on 220? Then sell off again when you move, for most of what you have into it? You will wind up with better tools, if the hassle agrees with your personal goals.

    Leave a comment:


  • calfee20
    replied
    Originally posted by commuter ebikes View Post
    I wonder if this welder would be enough: https://www.millerwelds.com/equipmen...welders-m30132
    I don't know much about TIG. The stick, MIG, and gas welding I have done is all self taught. I read up a little and found out that Miller you linked to will only do steels. You need AC for aluminum. Maybe read this page over for some info. http://www.welderworld.net/

    My EX son-in-law is a very good TIG welder but we don't talk to much anymore.

    Leave a comment:


  • ykick
    replied
    Ambitious my friend. Good luck and much success with what will certainly be an epic experience!

    110VAC no way I’d even consider a semi-serious shop, welder, air compressor, etc., NOT on 220VAC.

    Taken a step further, my brother owns some 3 phase machine tools but operates them in single phase boondock country by using a large battery bank and 3qty not so cheap Outback inverters. Very cool to have commercial power available out in the boonies….

    Wish there was more help here for your questions? Have you found frame building forums to pick some nuggets up here and there? Go sweep floors for a builder to gain some insights? How much hands on with currently outfitted and working environment? That would seem to be paramount, IMO...

    These decisions will play a roll in everything moving forward. If you don’t really have a genuine working grasp of the needs yet, as we’ve learned with eBikes, there’s simply vast numbers of nuances which can/will result in less than satisfactory consequences?

    Leave a comment:


  • Poco Askew
    replied
    I can't help with specifics, but whatever you get, I'd make sure it works with 220V. I've never done bike frames, but I wouldn't buy a mill, lathe or welder that is110V. Maybe with thin-wall tubing (only), you can get away with it. But it still seems like a huge limitation for possible future uses/projects. If you are spending $18K+, I'd consider the cost of running a 220V circuit (or two, or three) into the cost of outfitting the shop.

    Leave a comment:


  • commuter ebikes
    replied
    I wonder if this welder would be enough: https://www.millerwelds.com/equipmen...welders-m30132

    Leave a comment:


  • commuter ebikes
    started a topic Frame building shop tools

    Frame building shop tools

    Over the next two years, I am going to equip a bicycle frame building shop. I am making this thread to solicit help in selecting the right equipment, particularly a welder and mill.

    I will probably buy all of the things from this place http://www.anvilbikes.com/anvil-tools/ that pertain to making 4130 Chromoly steel cargo frames, so that covers the jigs and tube bender.

    I plan to only do TIG. I am taking classes on brazing and Ti, but the frames that I make will be TIG steel. This class is what I will be doing: https://www.bikeschool.com/index.php...frame-building

    I only do this for a hobby. I know it doesn't make financial sense, but I work long hours so I need to get the most out of my limited hobby time. My frame building tool budget starts at $18K, but it is okay if it goes up to $36K.

    I have visited one frame building shop in my life. The guy had a large (metal?) table that he used to repair my frame. He did TIG stainless. I wonder why I didn't see a jig.

    I currently don't have 220V in my garage and I rent, so I might have to power the welder with 110V. I don't even know if that is enough power. It is doubtful that I would put in a 220V outlet in my landlord's house, and renting a warehouse with a 220V outlet is unaffordable.

    I had a link to an appropriate welder, but I deleted the link. Can any of you guys or gals please point me in the right direction for a welder, mill, band saw, lathe or anything else you think that I would need?

    I am starting my welder search here: https://www.millerwelds.com/equipment/welders/tig-gtaw
    Last edited by commuter ebikes; 12-24-2017, 10:18 PM.
Working...
X