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Buildin an electric tricycle

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    Buildin an electric tricycle

    Im a mechatronics student and im here to ask for advice about the batteries, motor and other stuff i need to build this. This is a project for school... There are two kind of batteries, one has a system for battery inside and the other ones are just battery cells, but then i also have to buy the BMS which is a bit more expensive. The motor im going to use is 500-750w so i need a battery with 48v so i can use the full 750w it can do, but i also need enough power to do about 50-70km. With the batteris form the secound link i would need about 14-16 cells and for each battery a BMS which is very expensive. I dont know what the best thing to do is so im here asking for advice from professional. Any help would be appreciated.
    Link for the motor: Hub-Drive eBike kit 500/750W - Front 28" | shop.GWL.eu
    Link for batteries:eBike battery 16,5Ah (792Wh) - frame design (48V) | shop.GWL.eu or LiFePO4 High Power Cell (3.2V/20Ah) - Alu case, CE | shop.GWL.eu

    #2
    6kw hub motor: 6KW Hub Motor (evlithium.com)
    batteries: E-bike battery - Evlithium

    Comment


      #3
      Grin Products are the Hubmotor experts. They also have an E bike simulator that probably doesn't model trikes.
      https://ebikes.ca/product-info/grin-products.html
      The E bike simulator.
      https://ebikes.ca/tools/simulator.html
      They mentioned to me in a e mail about an upcoming controller that will have 2x parallel battery connectors to one controller. You might ask about that.
      They used a dynamometer and wind tunnel to generate their data. But a coast down test might allow you to calculate your own load line to superimpose on their motor charts. This may be hard to do with solid hub motors installed due to magnetic drag.
      Last edited by Retrorockit; 6 days ago.

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Retrorockit View Post
        Grin Products are the Hubmotor experts. They also have an E bike simulator that probably doesn't model trikes.
        https://ebikes.ca/product-info/grin-products.html
        The E bike simulator.
        https://ebikes.ca/tools/simulator.html
        They mentioned to me in a e mail about an upcoming controller that will have 2x parallel battery connectors to one controller. You might ask about that.
        They used a dynamometer and wind tunnel to generate their data. But a coast down test might allow you to calculate your own load line to superimpose on their motor charts. This may be hard to do with solid hub motors installed due to magnetic drag.
        If you want to model a trike just use the recumbent setting.

        Comment


        • Retrorockit
          Retrorockit commented
          Editing a comment
          I hadn't looked into that, but not all recumbents are trikes. And that sim models aero which would be quite different.

        • calfee20
          calfee20 commented
          Editing a comment
          I thought it was close enough. My real world results were pretty much in line. I have found that tire changes make the most difference. I have found that across all of my bikes both mid drive and DD hubs 2 wheels and 3 wheels a certain wattage will give you a given amount of performance.

          500 watts will get between 15 and 20 mph while 750 watts will get you over 20 and 1000 maybe 30 if you pedal. A friend of mine and I say "Watts is Watts"

        • Retrorockit
          Retrorockit commented
          Editing a comment
          Since the OP is an engineering student the exercise of running a coast down test might be worthwhile in and of itself.
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