Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

I Like The OLD Look

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    I Like The OLD Look

    I'm in my early 60s now, and I'd like to have/build a powered bike that's looks are inspired
    by the early FN motorcycle in the first photo below. It's from model year 1911. BUT, I'd have
    an electric motor of course, and the battery or batteries would be stored within a false gas
    tank that is situated just as the FN's is. I won't concern myself with the "look" of the electric
    motor initially. I will want the look of the 1911 FN's: handlebars, suspension front fork, frame
    shape, the placement of the "false" gas tank, the style and placement of the seat. I'm thinking
    a good starting point would be the M2600 model bicycle from worksmancycles.com as shown
    in the photo below the 1911 FN. Top speed goal is high teens MPH on level ground. I welcome
    all of your thoughts on how to get something like this completed and rolling!

    Click image for larger version

Name:	1911 FN.png
Views:	205
Size:	728.3 KB
ID:	155354
    Click image for larger version

Name:	Worksman UltraCommuter.png
Views:	153
Size:	254.9 KB
ID:	155355




    Last edited by AdvenJack; 08-30-2022, 05:31 PM.

    #2
    Neat looking bike and that frame looks like a carbon copy of the old bike. The 'gas tank' would be the obvious point for batteries and 'gas line' being electric wires running to the controller. You could probably find some heat sink fins to pretty closely replicate the cylinder cooling fins. Would be really cool to somehow incorporate a big DIY axial flux motor as an approximation of the old motor's flywheel.

    Looking forward to seeing the progress!

    Comment


      #3
      Thank you for responding! You mention HEAT SINK FINS, and I'll need to learn about those, as that phrase is NOT one that I'm familiar with. LOL.
      I just like the frame lines of the old FN so much! Look at the way the the upper and lower horizontal tubes, (above and below the fuel tank) are par-
      allel to each other, AND parallel to the lowest portion of the frame tubes, AND all 4 are parallel to the level floor. THAT really grabs me. Also very
      attractive to me is the angle of the short forward down tube, and the angle of the longer, rear down tube, in which the seat post is held. The shape
      and angle of the handlebars, the ancient looking head lamp , the shock absorbing front fork, etc., all just "pull at me "! The old Triumph is similarly
      Great Looking to me too!Click image for larger version

Name:	Triumph.png
Views:	152
Size:	532.0 KB
ID:	155372

      Comment


        #4
        Click image for larger version  Name:	the-elettracker-could-fool-you-into-thinking-it-was-a-vintage-motorbike.webp Views:	0 Size:	99.5 KB ID:	155374check this out at insideevs

        Comment


          #5
          Board track style is something that we're seeing a lot of. You can see the frame tubes on this blue beauty are bent differently
          and meet each other at different angles compared to the 1911 FN. This above bike will certainly draw many customers. What
          I hope to possess might not have anywhere near as many enthusiasts.

          Comment


            #6
            "heat sink fins" - in this case, talking about the fins on the side of the cylinder to help dissipate heat from the engine. Though a wider definition would be any sort of metal block designed to dissipate heat.

            In your case, they would almost be 'just for show'. You might need a small heat sink for the mosfets your controller, but I was trying to think of ways you could replicate the look of the cylinder and cooling fins. The easy way would be to get a 'jug' off an old motorcycle - which would be the empty cylinder with fins. But that would be pretty heavy for a bike.

            https://duckduckgo.com/?t=ffab&q=heat+sink&atb=v149-1&iax=images&ia=images

            https://duckduckgo.com/?q=harley+cylinder+jug&t=ffab&atb=v149-1&iar=images&iax=images&ia=images

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by K442 View Post
              "heat sink fins" - in this case, talking about the fins on the side of the cylinder to help dissipate heat from the engine. Though a wider definition would be any sort of metal block designed to dissipate heat.

              In your case, they would almost be 'just for show'. You might need a small heat sink for the mosfets your controller, but I was trying to think of ways you could replicate the look of the cylinder and cooling fins. The easy way would be to get a 'jug' off an old motorcycle - which would be the empty cylinder with fins. But that would be pretty heavy for a bike.

              https://duckduckgo.com/?t=ffab&q=heat+sink&atb=v149-1&iax=images&ia=images

              https://duckduckgo.com/?q=harley+cylinder+jug&t=ffab&atb=v149-1&iar=images&iax=images&ia=images
              K442,

              Thank you for your detailed post. The process of learning about all the relevant "fine points" with an undertaking of this sort, is enjoyable to me.
              Your contribution to that "path I'm on" has obvious value!

              Comment

              Working...
              X