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Recommend a best torque wrench?

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  • Recommend a best torque wrench?

    Once I broke my disc break components from overtightening and had to buy a new one. Since then, I've been thinking of buying a torque wrench. It was a bit hard for me to choose one. If I want to buy one for general bike maintenance, what would you recommend?

    I'm thinking about buying this one:
    http://www.amazon.com/ACDelco-ARM602...bin:2801509011
    Last edited by vivaldi; 04-18-2016, 09:58 AM.

  • #2
    I was far more fastidious on my Vespa and bought from Mac Tools. When I retired it I got near the price paid. For the bike I went budget. I kinda like what you found. Very interesting. But I think for the tool box I'd prefer not digital. I've been happy with Park and Pedro tools. From my wrenching days $100 seems a realistic range. But I've dumbed down to a simple beam type on the bike.

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    • #3
      Thinking about this,

      http://www.amazon.com/VENZO-Bicycle-...+torque+wrench

      Or,

      http://www.amazon.com/Park-Tool-ATD-...+torque+wrench With bit set.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by vivaldi View Post
        Once I broke my disc break components from overtightening and had to buy a new one. Since then, I've been thinking of buying a torque wrench. It was a bit hard for me to choose one. If I want to buy one for general bike maintenance, what would you recommend?

        I'm thinking about buying this one:
        http://www.amazon.com/ACDelco-ARM602...bin:2801509011
        What are the nm ratings most commonly used?

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        • #5
          Louis Luna Thanks for the recommendation. I'm buying the VENZO one because it provides a wider range of torque, although the park tool one may be sufficient in most cases.

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          • #6
            I think digital tools are silly, when you only use them occasionally and mechanical alternatives are perfectly reliable. Nothing like pulling a battery powered tool out of the toolbox to find a dead or leaked battery after long storage. Adding those pretty digits makes anything seem accurate. But it's hard to beat a simple beam mechanism for reliably measuring torque or tire pressure, etc.

            Click wrenches are fine, and that one you picked should work great. You can check calibration if you want to at home easily enough if you are ever concerned about accuracy.
            Fabrication is fun! Build something today. Show someone. Let them help. Inspire and share. Spread the desire.

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            • #7
              Beam style is hard to beat. I still have my first one. It looks like I threw it down a canyon in Arizona, let it wash down the Colorado River for a year, then picked it up again in Mexico, but it still works! And it was cheap. I picked it up at a tool stand in front of a Pic A Part. Since then, I've picked up more beam styles. in lb ft lb, etc, large and small. I love them!

              I've picked up a few of the click styles over the years as well. Cheap from Harbor Freight, mid priced from Home Depot, and expensive from the tool truck guy. I think the HF cheapo is just as good as the expensive one, and I never had to worry about it disappearing out of my tool box at work.

              I've also had a ton of the cheap, and not so cheap hand T style ones that are calibrated for specific torque values. The cheap ones ran around $25-30, and the more expensive ones ran from $40-60. In this case, the cheap ones way outperformed the more expensive ones. I would have to get a new expensive one every big job I worked on, but the cheap ones would get lost before needing replacement. This makes me not trust the click style much these days. They need occasional calibration.

              My suggestion is to go get a cheap beam style in in lb and another one in ft lb. Should be the same or less than a single digital and should last a life time.

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              • #8
                I'm sorry, it's silly to think a beam is even a close approximation of a good torque wrench.

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                • #9
                  If a mechanic is unable to correctly “estimate” torque by feel and the length of wrench used they simply need more practice.

                  I’m not suggesting doing this for rod journals, cylinder head bolts or super critical stuff but when you’ve applied 20-50-100 ft/lbs to basic fasteners using a particular length wrench enough times, you’ll simply “know” when it’s close enough.

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                  • #10
                    It is hard to beat a snap on tool
                    I use a 1/4 inch 3/8 inch and a 1/2 inch torque wrenches
                    You can pick them up on ebay and have them recalibrated real reasonable

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                    • #11
                      Harbor Freight is having a deal on torque wrenches right now that if you don't have one, this would be a very good deal at $10

                      1/4: http://www.harborfreight.com/14-in-d...nch-61277.html

                      3/8: http://www.harborfreight.com/3-8-eig...rench-807.html

                      1/2: http://www.harborfreight.com/1-2-hal...nch-62431.html

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                      • #12
                        I have a variety of Chinese tools. Most have been really good for my DIY projects. Anything that breaks gets replaced with something of consequence. AC Delco branded tools are still Chinese tools. AC Delco doesn't make tools. I generally like Craftsman tools but anymore I don't think they are any better than any other average tool.

                        I have a trio of clicker style torque wrenches. One is inch-pounds, other is 3/8 ft-lbs, and last one is 1/2" ft-lbs.

                        I do spend money on brand name screwdrivers. I have had the cheap screwdrivers mess up fasteners or just had the tip twist right off. Yeah, I've had some junky screwdrivers.

                        I prefer Klein screwdrivers or Beta screwdrivers (Italian). I actively avoid Stanley b/c of bad experiences with their screwdrivers yet they are everywhere.

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                        • #13
                          Torque wrenches tell you how much pressure you are applying, not how tight the fastener is -- that depends on the condition of the thread and how oily it is.
                          That's just one reason I prefer going by the 'feel'-- but a ratchet handle 1 foot long and a spring balance (which is easily checked for accuracy) will give as good a result as a torque wrench.
                          A novice relying on a click will not develop the necessary sensitivity that should be used with all hand tools.

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                          • #14
                            Torque wrenches tell you how much pressure you are applying, not how tight the fastener is -- that depends on the condition of the thread and how oily it is.
                            That's just one reason I prefer going by the 'feel'-- but a ratchet handle 1 foot long and a spring balance (which is easily checked for accuracy) will give as good a result as a torque wrench.
                            A novice relying on a click will not develop the necessary sensitivity that should be used with all hand tools.
                            I am thinking to buy a new torque wrench. Have you any idea about TEKTON 24335 ½ inch torque wrench. It worth for money or not?
                            Update: I bought that tekton wrench after reading this https://theeffectiveguide.com/best-torque-wrench/ review. That site has listed top 5 popular amazon torque wrench. However, tekton wrench looks good to me.
                            Last edited by koamoikra; 3 weeks ago.
                            Need Advice

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                            • calfee20
                              calfee20 commented
                              Editing a comment
                              That is a deal that is to good to be true. A decent click type torque wrench will be more expensive than that. Read some of the one star reviews.

                              If you are going to live or die by the torque wrench you will need at least two. A lot of bike torque settings are very low so a small well inch/pound unit may be needed.

                              When starting out wrenching it is not a bad idea to assemble something and then go back and check with a torque wrench to see how you did. IMHO for someone to develop a good "feel" like Gabriel mentioned takes a lot of time and thousands of repetitions to get it into muscle memory. So if you are worried about it a torque wrench is a good idea.

                          • #15
                            When I worked on Avro Vulcan aircraft in the seventies, the torque wrench lived on the hangar wall, mounted on a test rig with a dial.
                            Every time you used the wrench, you tested it at the required setting.
                            EVERY time.
                            Failure to do this would be a grim business.

                            I have no information on how often the test rig was tested, or how that was accomplished.
                            Hence a certain ambivalence ...

                            Maybe they tested it with a lever one foot long, and an accurate spring balance?
                            Last edited by Gabriel; 1 week ago.

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