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    Little or no info

    Regenerative Braking - Is this even a benefit? I feel having a free spinning tire only slowed by terrain and gravity would get a rider further. It also makes riding uncomfortable in certain ways, adds a jerky motion to the ride. Without some sort of data showing the total additional power generated, how can someone even make accurate decisions on which is better? I haven't tested it enough, but the difference is minimal and lackluster.


    #2
    check this vid out

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=57ddunO4XWw

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by rotary View Post
      Citizen arrest.
      Any video made by SirRonster will be used as evidence... to keep SirRonster off the streets.

      C&P`ed from Section 2 of the Road Traffic Act of1988
      which deals with the offence of Dangerous Driving which is often how the police get drivers prosecuted for pulling a wheelie.
      The idea is that if you are not in full control of your vehicle it is inherently dangerous, in the case of a wheelie it leaves the rider with no steering or front brake.
      A wheelie can be prima-facie evidence of a lack of due care for the rider’s own safety and that of other road users.

      Another reason I wanted a SRX-LB is because I thought it would be EZ to do balance wheelie.
      I`ve been riding dirt bikes since 1973 and could do power wheelies EZ but balance wheelie not so EZ
      I999 I bought my son a XR-90. I could do balance wheelies very EZ.
      Finaly I realized (after watching another illegal video) That regenerative braking was the problem for doing balance wheelies.
      I wish I could control my SRX-LB power wheelies with more control.

      Comments from the video posted above I agree with.
      "" I find the regenerative-braking is annoying and actually makes me use more battery, because you have to keep hitting the throttle to get back up to speed...it is like you are fighting yourself.""

      PS. Cancel the Citizens Arrest. But be careful on the streets.
      Last edited by dirtman; 01-10-2022, 01:29 PM.

      Comment


        #4
        Have you ever ridden a motorcycle? The difference between regen and non-regen is the same as motor braking differences between a 4-stroke and a 2-stroke, or between a 2-stroke and a MTB that freewheels.

        For off-road use, especially for tough terrain like black diamond trails, I want all the braking assistance I can get, so I go full regen.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by JohnKol View Post
          Have you ever ridden a motorcycle? The difference between regen and non-regen is the same as motor braking differences between a 4-stroke and a 2-stroke, or between a 2-stroke and a MTB that freewheels.

          For off-road use, especially for tough terrain like black diamond trails, I want all the braking assistance I can get, so I go full regen.
          I agree. Regen braking is great, just use the throttle to "coast". It absolutely saves brake pad wear and provides a measure of control. There is an argument that it's hard on the batteries to constantly flux between draw and charge, thus shortening their life, but from what I hear it's not a very significant effect on the health of the batteries compared to proper charging (ie only charge to 100% if absolutely needed).

          Comment


            #6
            "Most" Dirt bike riders like the regen braking, and "most" mountain bike riders do not. (Edit: added "most" 2x)
            On the Sur-Ron, it is adjustable.
            Last edited by avoshall; 02-01-2022, 05:55 AM.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by avoshall View Post
              Dirt bike riders like the regen braking, and mountain bike riders do not.
              Not really true, I ride dirt bikes and MTBs, and the difference comes from the terrain, not the vehicle: dirt bike trails are vastly gnarlier than MTB trails, and would actually be impossible to complete on a MTB. On a 40% descent, no amount of regen is going to slow you down by itself, so there is no reason not to have it full on.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by JohnKol View Post

                Not really true, I ride dirt bikes and MTBs, and the difference comes from the terrain, not the vehicle: dirt bike trails are vastly gnarlier than MTB trails, and would actually be impossible to complete on a MTB. On a 40% descent, no amount of regen is going to slow you down by itself, so there is no reason not to have it full on.
                I disagree, everything is not black and white like that. Sure dirt bikes can climb steeper hills, but MTB's can decend knarly hills. Some trails can be dual use, especially on private property.
                Regen or engine braking is very helpful in slowing you down on steep decents without locking up the rear wheel, even if you also have to hit the rear brake periodically.

                I guess my statement above was also too "black and white" so I added "most."

                Comment


                • AZguy
                  AZguy commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Regen appropriateness is not only very dependent on use cases, but vehicle weight makes a big difference too... for lighter vehicles it's less appropriate, the heavier the vehicle, the more beneficial it is IMO

                #9
                Originally posted by JohnKol View Post

                Not really true, I ride dirt bikes and MTBs, and the difference comes from the terrain, not the vehicle: dirt bike trails are vastly gnarlier than MTB trails, and would actually be impossible to complete on a MTB. On a 40% descent, no amount of regen is going to slow you down by itself, so there is no reason not to have it full on.
                The mountain bike/dirt bike trail situation is the opposite in Colorado. Mountain bike trails are definitely more gnarly, in general. Some of the trails are shared, and on a moto the extra difficult gnarly trails are considered standard difficulty for a mountain bike.

                Comment


                  #10
                  Originally posted by MountainRider View Post
                  The mountain bike/dirt bike trail situation is the opposite in Colorado. Mountain bike trails are definitely more gnarly, in general. Some of the trails are shared, and on a moto the extra difficult gnarly trails are considered standard difficulty for a mountain bike.
                  A MTB cannot climb a 50% incline, it cannot pedal through an 8"-wide, 12"-deep rut, nor can it ride moguls 2' P2P, conditions that are everywhere in OHV trails in CA.

                  The fact that dirt bikes have 30 HP vs 0.5 for a MTB, 12" suspension vs 8", and 13" of ground clearance vs 2", clearly makes them capable of going to places that a MTB will never be able to reach. So either the physical laws are different in Colorado, or there are no dirt bike trails there.

                  Comment


                    #11
                    I live 1200' vertical up a mountain, and use regen every day in my plug in Prius. It's clearly a win win win: keeping the speed under control, saving brakes, and adding EV range when I get on level ground. I expect I'll be using my Sur Ron Sport mode a lot. By that I mean, I expect to be switching back and forth a lot, for best performance, when it makes sense.

                    Comment


                      #12
                      50% incline is very doable on MTB - 50% grade is only about 26°, steep but not terribly difficult, I've done steeper on MTB and on electric I've done close to 100% grade

                      There are places an MTB can go that heavier motos can't and motos can go places MTB's can't with their limitations, they're different machines for different missions

                      Comment


                        #13
                        Originally posted by AZguy View Post
                        50% incline is very doable on MTB
                        No it's not; if you think it is, then you have not experienced such steep slopes. You cannot walk up a 50% dirt incline, there is simply no traction.

                        Incidentally, TdF riders have to zig-zag on 30% inclines, and that's on asphalt.

                        Comment


                          #14
                          Originally posted by JohnKol View Post

                          No it's not; if you think it is, then you have not experienced such steep slopes. You cannot walk up a 50% dirt incline, there is simply no traction.

                          Incidentally, TdF riders have to zig-zag on 30% inclines, and that's on asphalt.
                          I have experienced 100% inclines on the moto and 4x4... 50% is not a big deal at all on the electric bike as long as it's not too loose and doable with a properly setup MTB, it's only about 26°... there's plenty of it around here that's steeper than that

                          I can't walk up much these days, I'm old and crippled, but I've hiked up plenty of stuff that's quite steep when I was younger, >100%

                          Comment


                            #15
                            AZguy
                            50% incline is very doable on MTB incline is very doable on MTB
                            50% grade is only about 26°,

                            Originally posted by JohnKol View Post

                            No it's not; if you think it is, then you have not experienced such steep slopes.
                            You cannot walk up a 50% dirt incline, there is simply no traction.

                            Incidentally, TdF riders have to zig-zag on 30% inclines, and that's on asphalt.
                            If a 50% grade is only a 26-degree uphill angle.
                            The Dirt-trails behind my house are at least a 1/4 mile 30-degree uphill angle.
                            My human-powered Mountain bike I could pedal up that hill a as long as its dry.


                            4 years ago our Veterans group was planning to cross the 340 mile trip across the
                            Great American Passage (GAP) from Pittsburgh to Washington DC. (Rails to Trails)
                            These Vets many near 70 years old would ride parts of the trail daily for practice.
                            I found riding the trails very boring and used the dirt trail behind my home for training.
                            The day I decided to go on a 50 mile practice ride. I made it about 20 miles and dropped out due to extreme blisters on my legs and butt.
                            The GAP is only a 2 Degree max incline. This summer I might just go to the top of the mountain and drift downhill with minimum pedaling into Wash DC.







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