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    BBSHD Lights

    Finishing up my first DIY build, 52V battery with a BBSHD. It has the extra 6V cable for lights but from what I understand this is quite underpowered? More importantly the only lights I've seen that are intended for that system all look like cheap Chinese knock-offs. Very big and appear to have low build quality.

    Is there another way to connect more powerful lights directly to a BBSHD? Perhaps 52V lights if there is such a thing? Ideally I don't want to have to strap any additional external controllers or such to my bike.

    Knowledge level of electrical systems: low, willingness to learn and ability to follow instructions: high.

    #2
    IIRC, you mostly commute on your bike - would your lights have to adhere to regulations similar to the German TUV standards?

    The BBSHD controller's 6-volt output is intended to power dynamo lights, for which some highly efficient ones are available (at rather stratospheric pricing). My guess is they're sufficient for commuting on semi-lit roads, and their beam patterns wouldn't upset car drivers. No additional switches are required, as the existing button panel turns on & off the light (long-press the "up" button). Unfortunately, the low-cost "Bafang" 6-volt lights, from what I've read, have very poor light output/coverage.

    A plug-n-play, easy-to-install alternative to using the motor's 6-volt output are the inline harness kits that pick up the battery-level voltage in the main harness and feeds it out to purportedly better lighting - here's an example:
    Click image for larger version  Name:	51hok2DZlCL._AC_SL1000_.jpg Views:	0 Size:	70.5 KB ID:	161885

    Along with the headlight, brake and rear turn signals are provided - how well they can be seen in bright sunlight, who knows? Bar space for the switch is also needed.

    Neither of the above is likely suitable off-road, at high speed over unknown terrain - unless your night vision is outstanding. If you still want bike battery powered lighting, I think you'd have to delve into the DIY arena. The (high price point) dual high/low CYC lights may offer an easier starting point, requiring only the power plugs be changed (assuming you have the stock Bafang Anderson connectors):
    Click image for larger version  Name:	b13a26_753420f83e094c079ce769409ab59bd8_mv2_1800x1800.png Views:	0 Size:	728.3 KB ID:	161886

    If your Bafang display has a USB port, there are USB-recharged handlebar-mounted lights.

    I recently went the DIY route with off-the-shelf components on one of my builds and didn't want to go the hard-wired, no fuse/connector route. I already had the tools and experience required. I doubt I saved that much over buying a kit like the above. Sourcing small, sturdy, and well-sealed connectors is but one of the problems.
    Last edited by ncmired; 04-30-2023, 09:22 AM.

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by ncmired View Post
      IIRC, you mostly commute on your bike - would your lights have to adhere to regulations similar to the German TUV standards?

      The BBSHD controller's 6-volt output is intended to power dynamo lights, for which some highly efficient ones are available (at rather stratospheric pricing). My guess is they're sufficient for commuting on semi-lit roads, and their beam patterns wouldn't upset car drivers. No additional switches are required, as the existing button panel turns on & off the light (long-press the "up" button). Unfortunately, the low-cost "Bafang" 6-volt lights, from what I've read, have very poor light output/coverage.

      A plug-n-play, easy-to-install alternative to using the motor's 6-volt output are the inline harness kits that pick up the battery-level voltage in the main harness and feeds it out to purportedly better lighting - here's an example:
      Along with the headlight, brake and rear turn signals are provided - how well they can be seen in bright sunlight, who knows? Bar space for the switch is also needed.

      Neither of the above is likely suitable off-road, at high speed over unknown terrain - unless your night vision is outstanding. If you still want bike battery powered lighting, I think you'd have to delve into the DIY arena. The (high price point) dual high/low CYC lights may offer an easier starting point, requiring only the power plugs be changed (assuming you have the stock Bafang Anderson connectors):
      If your Bafang display has a USB port, there are USB-recharged handlebar-mounted lights.

      I recently went the DIY route with off-the-shelf components on one of my builds and didn't want to go the hard-wired, no fuse/connector route. I already had the tools and experience required. I doubt I saved that much over buying a kit like the above. Sourcing small, sturdy, and well-sealed connectors is but one of the problems.
      Are you saying I could hook up something like this to the 6V cable and get full functionality as if I was using a dynamo hub?

      The SUPERNOVA E3 PURE 3 is elegant, bright, and light. It is one of the smallest and brightest road-legal dynamo headlights with aluminum housing. The LEDs have an average lifespan of over 50,000 hours. With our Terraflux lens it is possible to connect day and night light light in an optics. So we can do without…


      Looks infinitely better than the other 6V Bafang lights I've seen!

      Would that work straight out of the box or require some modifications?

      Comment


        #4
        Although that particular light is A.C., I think it would work. You might instead consider the V521S HBM 5-21 volt D.C. version. To be sure, I'd contact Supernova.

        Both are the kind of premium output and pattern lights I was thinking of. Busch & Müller is another, with their less expensive 80 lux lights.
        Last edited by ncmired; 05-01-2023, 07:10 AM.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by ncmired View Post
          Although that particular light is A.C., I think it would work. You might instead consider the V521S HBM 5-21 volt D.C. version. To be sure, I'd contact Supernova.

          Both are the kind of premium output and pattern lights I was thinking of. Busch & Müller is another, with their less expensive 80 lux lights.
          The problem with the V521S is it has a power consumption of 4.8W. The 6V bike connector only gives a measly 3W.

          The dynamo lights are all 3W but I missed the fact that that's AC and not DC. Supernova says they might work anyway but if the voltage differs only slightly from the nominal 6V the light could die so they don't recommend it and say it's not covered under warranty.

          Comment


            #6
            Apologies if I've mislead you - it's a subject I've been sniffing around for a while.

            I don't understand why these lights are so expensive. My impression is that their engineering is just in the reflector and the lens, and my guess is there's no magic in the L.E.D. chosen. Patent protection in play? Since these L.E.D. lights are, at heart, D.C. in nature, why they can't release simplified (without A.C. to D.C. converters) low-power and lower-cost versions with good lenses and reflectors I don't know.

            What I did is find a low-cost light that deals with the battery voltage itself, and I will try adding a mild, optically fast glass Plano Convex lens to spread the pattern out a bit.
            Last edited by ncmired; 05-02-2023, 05:43 AM.

            Comment


              #7
              Most folks I know just get a rechargeable handlebar light and call it a day (or night Click image for larger version

Name:	biggrinteeth.gif
Views:	386
Size:	347 Bytes
ID:	161926) - easy peasy and many options that run from cheap low performance to super bright high performance...

              Most bikes in general don't have electrical systems - rechargeable lights dominates the market space

              I ride at night and seldom have to even charge mine although it has a standard cylindrical battery so it's also silly easy (and very low-cost) to carry a spare battery for it..

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by ncmired View Post
                Apologies if I've mislead you - it's a subject I've been sniffing around for a while.

                I don't understand why these lights are so expensive. My impression is that their engineering is just in the reflector and the lens, and my guess is there's no magic in the L.E.D. chosen. Patent protection in play? Since these L.E.D. lights are, at heart, D.C. in nature, why they can't release simplified (without A.C. to D.C. converters) low-power and lower-cost versions with good lenses and reflectors I don't know.

                What I did is find a low-cost light that deals with the battery voltage itself, and I will try adding a mild, optically fast glass Plano Convex lens to spread the pattern out a bit.
                I think I found something that will work with the 6V light connectors. Although I would have preferred the Supernova lights this seems to be on the same level and only draws around 3W @ 6V.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by AZguy View Post
                  Most folks I know just get a rechargeable handlebar light and call it a day (or night Click image for larger version

Name:	biggrinteeth.gif
Views:	386
Size:	347 Bytes
ID:	161926) - easy peasy and many options that run from cheap low performance to super bright high performance...

                  Most bikes in general don't have electrical systems - rechargeable lights dominates the market space

                  I ride at night and seldom have to even charge mine although it has a standard cylindrical battery so it's also silly easy (and very low-cost) to carry a spare battery for it..
                  Yeah I want something I can attach to the bike and never have to worry about again. Another big problem with the rechargeable lights is it's too easy to steal since it's designed to be removed easily for charging.

                  Comment


                  • AZguy
                    AZguy commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Mine is small enough to pop off and put in my pocket so that's what I typically do

                    I get it that a rechargeable may not be for everyone but they are the goto for most and there's so many options - trying to use the electric bike system is getting better but it's always had a bit of being like pushing a rope IMO

                  #10
                  In case anyone else is trying to get this to work I can report that I purchased a SON Edelux II DC. I haven't tried it out in the wild yet but hooked it up at home to the 6V, 3W light connectors on my BBSHD and it seems to work perfectly! Light is very bright and can be controlled with my EggRider display.

                  Comment


                    #11
                    Yeah, you can definitely hook up better lights to your BBSHD without needing extra controllers or anything complicated. A lot of folks go with a DC-DC converter to drop the 52V down to something more standard for bike lights, like 12V or 6V. That way, you're not stuck with those sketchy lights and can pick something solid. This approach lets you choose from a wider range of high-quality lights that are designed for more common voltages. You might also want to check out tutorials or forums specific to e-bike customization for step-by-step guides. And if you're looking for resources on LEDs or lighting projects, leds.to can be a handy place to start, you can find out here more. They have a broad range of information that could help you find exactly what you need for your build.
                    Last edited by Brian.Cooper; 1 week ago.

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