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BBS02 v BBSHD for hilly commute / 230lb rider / battery choice?

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    BBS02 v BBSHD for hilly commute / 230lb rider / battery choice?

    I promise I tried to find the answer from the forum before posting! :-)

    I have a 15-mi commute each way with several prolonged 3-4deg hills plus a couple of 5-6deg ones. I'm building up a Trek Cobia MTB as the commuter. I weigh about 230lbs (trying to get that down to 200). I have two questions:

    - Can the BBS02 meet my needs
    - Any recommendations on a good battery to pair with it

    Thanks for your input!!

    #2
    Hi ATXBill. Answer is, wait for it, depends.

    Default answer is if you can afford it go with HD but, 02 should serve your needs well at considerably less $$. I'm a smidgen heavier and live where hills (mountains) are far steeper & at least as long. I installed the Luna HD on my original build (MNT bike). It is overkill. 30mph throttle only (on the flat) running a 42T frontring, Sram8 rear on 26's. With 9 power settings I rarely get out of lvl1 and have never needed more than lvl3 but the caveat is I don't commute, I ride for exercise & enjoyment which means I only use the assist when it's needed or I simply don't feel like humping that hard, which is more common than I like to admit (I never come off the saddle accept to air out the danglers). I recently installed the 02 on a bent trike running a 46T front with a Sram dual 3/8 in the rear with 20's & have had no issues with strain or overheating but again I use my gears & use medium effort leg power.

    Get the HD if money is no object or you want to use mostly throttle and go fast for most of your commute. That said the HD is well worth the xtra $$. As to your battery question go with 48v or 52v for either 02 or HD and for your commute any of the dolphins or sharks from Luna will do as long as you can recharge at work but if your going to be doing throttle only with no recharge, 30 miles will take a larger battery most likely.




    Comment


      #3
      Good stuff, thanks Tonk. I definitely want to get a workout and I can't imagine ever going throttle only unless it's just to experience it for a little bit. So I can imagine staying in the Lvl 2-3 range a lot. My other issue is that I ruptured a lower disc and have another bulging, so climbing hills are a killer on my lower back...that's when I'd use the most PAS. Good feedback...thanks for the quick response.

      Comment


        #4
        A 30 mile commute everyday might be pretty hard on those ruptured and bulging discs. I hope you have a lot of suspension on that bike.

        Comment


          #5
          Thanks, OP. I do OK except for the hills. It's amazing how climbing shreds my back. It's a hard-tail with front suspension.

          Comment


            #6
            Bill, I just did a bbshd w/ 52V pack conversion on my MTB with commuting in mind. I have a 10 mile commute from sea level to 1500 ft. It is one very long hill. I'm very happy that I went with the HD because I use every bit of it going up (15mph+) the whole way. I enjoy my ride, but I like to 'get where I'm going', so the extra watts are nice. 30mph throttle on level ground is easy, but faster than I want to go. In sum, having more power is always better than not having enough, imo. Good luck

            Comment


            • ATXBill
              ATXBill commented
              Editing a comment
              Generally a good rule to follow...more hp is always better! I just didn't want to overkill it and add even more weight / bulk. But running out of steam if needed would be a drag.

            #7
            ATXBill. My MNT bike BBSHD is also a front suspension hard tail. I also have severe lower back & nerve issues. This is why I recently bought a recumbent trike and will keep the MNT bike for off-road fun.

            I installed this https://www.amazon.com/Suntour-SP12-...ost+suspension and it has helped immensely. It really works. Or you can opt for the thudbuster which in my opinion is no better and much more $$. Luna carries the thudbuster but not the Suntour. If you get the Suntour make sure of your seat post sizing. If it doesn't match up get the smaller diameter. I had to use a sleeve for mine.

            Comment


            • ATXBill
              ATXBill commented
              Editing a comment
              Genius...hadn't thought about seat suspension. I confess: i've seen those before and thought they were marketing bs. Glad to know they really work, and also glad to see they have adjustable tension. Great suggestion...thanks again Tonk.

            • OptimusPrime
              OptimusPrime commented
              Editing a comment
              I second the Suntour! I've had one for about a year now and love it!

            #8
            How much climbing? My commute is also 15 miles each way, with about 250-280 feet of climbing as reported by Strava. It's rolling hills and as I understand it Strava doesn't report every last inch of vertical elevation change, so actual climbing is probably more like 400 feet each way. I'm about 215, and I went with the BBS02 and a 13.5aH 52V GA-cell battery. Coming from a fresh 100% battery of 58.4 volts, after my 30 mile commute on Monday I still had over 51 volts left. So that was plenty. I averaged 18.5 MPH going home in the afternoon which is amazing, as I usually average 12-13 on my road bike.

            Comment


            • PatrickGSR94
              PatrickGSR94 commented
              Editing a comment
              For the rolling hills around here I shift quite a lot. Due to chain line I really can only use gears 3 through 8. I still use the 5-level PAS settings, and have never felt the need to go past 3. PAS 3 feels quite strong to me. I was coming home from work just awhile ago, cruising along a relatively flat road, in top gear 44x11, PAS 3 and fairly easily maintaining 30 MPH.

              As for shifting, I usually give the front brake handle a slight tug when shifting, which makes it feel like I'm actuating a motorcycle clutch almost. I do wish for just a button near my throttle where I could cut the motor quickly without losing momentum from the brakes, and while still pedaling forward which is required to make the chain change gears. I do not have a shift sensor. But the motor definitely needs to be off when shifting. Even if you're pedaling the same speed as the motor, the motor still imparts power through the chain which puts a lot of stress on it if you try to shift under power.

            • ATXBill
              ATXBill commented
              Editing a comment
              So at 44x11, are you are pretty maxed out in your gearing. Was trying to decide on a 46 vs. 44 chain ring.

            • PatrickGSR94
              PatrickGSR94 commented
              Editing a comment
              ATXBill I would say it's pretty maxed out high cadence pedaling, ~30-31 MPH in 44x11. I went smaller on the chainring to try to get the low end gearing lower to help get my heavy rig moving from a stop, and also to help keep the motor turning fast. 30 MPH is plenty for me. I'll be moving to a 42t Lekkie ring at some point to improve my chain line, so will lose a bit of top end, but I'll gain lots of low end.

            #9
            ATXBill,
            Tonk is correct it depends, are you commuting for speed & exercise or only maximizing exercise?. I commute 2x 26 miles each direction and according to my gps it's about 1900ft of accumulated ups/downs. For me it's about getting to my destination fast. I have a Luna 52V, 24ah battery with a Golden Motor hub drive, my average speed is really good and I use about 15-17 ah each way [I get back about 1 ah from regen]. To prolong the life of your battery I recommend getting more capacity than you 'll use so you can keep charges under 80 or 90% of max and discharge volt over about 3.3V/cell.

            Comment

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