Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Pedal resistance

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Pedal resistance

    How much pedal resistance should i feel with a BBSHD to make sure that the motor is not lugging. i find myself spinning the pedals (no/barely any pedal resistance) which i assume means that the motor is doing all the work. How do we make sure that we are giving the motor the proper assistance so that its spinning at a good rate. When i rise i like to feel some pedal resistance mean I'm usually in the harder gears when I ride, but don't want to hurt the motor unduly. THANKS.

    #2
    Hard to do with 52V battery packs. Even on 48V the electric motor RPM can often make our legs appear cartoonish.

    This is where programming for low power and speed PAS settings can help.

    The thing about lugging to avoid is low speed AND high power. Anytime you’re running low enough motor RPM to feel significant pedal resistance you should avoid higher power levels. It’s just one of those things which is a nuance to wrap one’s head around.

    Comment


      #3
      If the motor is spinning so fast you can't keep up with the pedals it does not need any assistance and you might be geared too low. If it is spinning so slowly you have to stand on the pedals for long you are geared too high.

      Comment


        #4
        For hard climbs if you should shoot for a pedal cadence at or above 100 rpm for maximum efficiency. Normal riding a cadence of 70-80 will be fine. When you are getting below a cadence of 50 RPMs the motor is starting to operated in it's inefficient range.

        The maximum efficient rpm increases linearly with the increase in voltage. I have found that my C3kW with a 66V battery is most efficient when the cranks are spinning at 160 RPM. IF I tried to pedal I would look like a BumbleBee on speed :)

        Comment


          #5
          i guess there's alot to be said in favor of a torque senor. Dream system torque sensor + cadence sensor (switchable) + a over riding throttle.

          Comment


            #6
            Yes it seems complicated at first. After a few trips it comes pretty natural. 100 RPMs is what you might do on a cardio training ride. 70-80 is a steady touring cadence. 50 RPMs your will knees start to hurt.

            Comment

            Working...
            X