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Luna X-1 Enduro FS ebike MANUAL

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  • jjdicecco
    commented on 's reply
    Yeah I did the same thing I wonder if the water shorted it out… because it’s the same wiring harness… hmmmm any thoughts?

  • EL34
    replied
    I unplugged my throttle also a long time ago.
    I put some electrical tape over the plug
    No issues ever with that so far

    Leave a comment:


  • jjdicecco
    commented on 's reply
    I found an error code 5 as a throttle error which is weird because I never use the throttle … I unplugged it the day I received my bike … I was caught in bad rain driving home the other day not sure if water found it’s way to the module that controls the throttle/display causing this? I’m a little baffled lol… thank you for the response

  • EL34
    replied
    Originally posted by jjdicecco View Post
    Hello everyone.. today I experienced a error 5 on my x1… it was pretty random… can’t think of anything out of the ordinary that would cause this… connections seem done any suggestions?
    I don't know what Error code 5 is?
    This is the error code list that I have

    Click image for larger version

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    Leave a comment:


  • jjdicecco
    replied
    Hello everyone.. today I experienced a error 5 on my x1… it was pretty random… can’t think of anything out of the ordinary that would cause this… connections seem done any suggestions?

    Leave a comment:


  • tpellaton
    replied
    Here in the Pacific Northwest we need to have fenders for our bikes as it is wet and muddy most of the year. Has anyone put fenders on the X1, if so how are they working out. Especially interested in a good fit for a rear fender. Can take the fender off for the Summer months.
    Still waiting for the new X1 to ship.

    Leave a comment:


  • AZguy
    replied
    Originally posted by EL34 View Post
    I was talking about bike meters that you can set the wheel circumference
    That type of meter is going to give you way more accurate mileage than GPS can on non straight/curvy paths

    ...
    There are just too many variables - there are going to be times when a GPS is better (the oregon is not a terribly accurate one and has a lot of susceptibility to multipath) and times when a wheel speed meter is better

    Did you set your GPS to log at one point per second or did you have the logging set to "auto"? That makes a big difference and I wouldn't trust what the oregon reports on the UI regardless, I'd look at the 1pt/sec log data for the distance and would expect what the oregon reports to be low. I'd also look at the log and if any of the 1pt/sec data points are obviously bad, remove them from the log.

    The oregon supports the wheel speed sensor, did you try it with that: https://buy.garmin.com/en-US/US/p/pn/010-12843-00 that may give you the best results although I'd still set it to log at 1pt/sec too

    You have posted three numbers but how do you *know* what the actual distance is? What is the gold standard you are comparing too?


    I'm not asking all this to be awkward, it's part of what I do professionally so I tend to look at this stuff very critically, so no offense meant

    Leave a comment:


  • EL34
    replied
    I was talking about bike meters that you can set the wheel circumference
    That type of meter is going to give you way more accurate mileage than GPS can on non straight/curvy paths

    Post #89 on this page is an example of this
    https://electricbike.com/forum/forum...-x1-mods/page3

    I knew the X1's mileage was not correct because of a ride I had done many times and knew the mileage

    In post #89 I reported this
    I set up a bike meter on the front wheel using a magnet sensor
    I rolled out the bike on the floor with me on it to get the wheel circumference
    The tire pressure was set before I did this

    The X1 mileage was 35.6 miles
    The Garmin Oregon GPS mileage was 31.67 miles
    The bike meter mileage was 33.4 miles

    33.4 miles is way closer than the other two figures
    Last edited by EL34; 07-02-2021, 09:21 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • AZguy
    replied
    Originally posted by EL34 View Post
    joegold100

    GPS in a straight line with excellent satellite triangulation is accurate enough

    GPS on a a twisty mountain trail is no where close to being accurate
    Look at this new section of trail I recorded on my Garmin Oregon

    This is with my GPS set to record a track point as fast as it can to get as many track points as is possible.

    The trail is not squared off like the gps shows
    It is rounded.

    The GPS cuts corners and looses distance.

    A properly calibrated wheel sensor that stays in contact with the ground is way more accurate than the GPS that we consumers use.

    It's almost impractical to properly calibrate a wheel sensor without gps - not impossible but impractical... then again it depends on how accurate you want

    For consumers on bicycles the garmin approach of continually doing a wheel circumference calibration from longer baseline GNSS reception is likely the best approach and very accurate. The real-time speed is entirely based on the wheel speed but it is also calibrating the wheel in real-time - you could lose air pressure and it will compensate

    Phones' GPS are the worst mostly because of lousy antenna subsystems with high multipath susceptability and below par signal reception

    In cars and motos the speedometer are deliberately set to read a little high, more so on motos so even a consumer GPS is likely better, at least most of the time

    OTOH there are industrial GNSS systems that will blow everything out of the water in terms of speed accuracy. Even the "lower-end models" will track well over 800 signals and have a speed accuracy <3cm/s (<~0.04mph) and update at 100 times per second (vs. 1 per second consumer) - e.g. https://hexagondownloads.blob.core.w...duct-Sheet.pdf

    Even the unicorn of a well calibrated wheel speed sensor can't match that!

    Leave a comment:


  • AZguy
    commented on 's reply
    Consumer units are generally very good in straight lines when there are no satellite drops or multipath, but if not straight they'll read slower and they are susceptible to multipath - phones have poor antennas so don't do well with speed and accuracy in poor conditions

    Industrial quality units can be exceptionally accurate, far more immune to multipath and turns don't bother them much at all

    And like mentioned there are consumer GPS that can couple to wheel speed and do a really good job

  • EL34
    replied
    joegold100

    GPS in a straight line with excellent satellite triangulation is accurate enough

    GPS on a a twisty mountain trail is no where close to being accurate
    Look at this new section of trail I recorded on my Garmin Oregon

    This is with my GPS set to record a track point as fast as it can to get as many track points as is possible.

    The trail is not squared off like the gps shows
    It is rounded.

    The GPS cuts corners and looses distance.

    A properly calibrated wheel sensor that stays in contact with the ground is way more accurate than the GPS that we consumers use.


    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • joegold100
    commented on 's reply
    From everything I read online GPS is very accurate. In fact, there is a really good article about that here: https://www.theglobeandmail.com/glob...rticle4348596/

    It does seem to verify your statement about clean line of site to the satellite. However, for my testing I was in a good area. In addition, I've compared the GPS speed listed on the same app to my cars speedometer and it is nearly identical.

    More importantly, the reason I brought this up goes back to another post where I mentioned that having the speed showing on a huge color display as it does on the X1 was ridiculous and useless. You will never need to know how fast you are going up or down a trail. So my point is, if the speedometer is not accurate, and it's not needed for the bikes intended purpose of trail riding, why is the speed shown so big on the color display?

  • KTMracer63
    commented on 's reply
    Brian99, that manual link you shared is for the BBSHD / 860 Display.

    m600: https://lunacycle.com/m600-luna-full...able-selector/ No Manual

    BBSHD: https://lunacycle.com/luna-full-colo...able-selector/ Manual
    Last edited by KTMracer63; 06-28-2021, 02:55 PM.

  • Brian99
    commented on 's reply
    They posted the manual now in the Luna page for the display. The wheel sizes are adjustable. They even show how to change the speed limit. But I don't need power above 28 mph.

    https://drive.google.com/file/d/1be2...PxWUr4RUE/view

  • F451
    commented on 's reply
    Hey guys, thanks so much for the detailed responses! Its a huge help, really appreciate it. -Ed
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