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14s, 15s, or ???

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    14s, 15s, or ???

    I am looking at buying a battery charger. The cycle statiator of course is awesome. The Luna 52v is probably going to be my first choice. When the cycle statiator upgrades to 72v I will seriously consider it. My question is if I plan on ONLY charging my battery to 80% wouldn't I want the "nominal" charge @ 80% to be in the 50's or low 60's voltage? That is if I wanted to keep the voltage around 52v. @ 80% charge. I know with lithium battery's (or so I have read) that they quickly get down to their "nominal" voltage then stay there for for most of your ride then drop quickly near the end. I see for example that the 52v Luna Charger is a 14s charger. It is probably impossible to hook up a 15s battery and only charge it to 80%.

    So I guess my questions are, Am I way out in left field in my thinking? Can this be done? And what are my options to accomplish this if it is a sound line of reasoning. I am building my own battery so I can do any number of s's as long as the charger will do it. Help needed!!!!!

    #2
    Hi thanks for the question.

    Unlike the Satiator charger the Luna charger can not be custom programmed for different voltages then it is already set to.

    Here are the maximum values of the 36, 48,52 and 72 volt Luna chargers: 36= 42v 48 = 54.6v 52 = 58.8v 72= 84v

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    • orcasmarx@yahoo.com
      Editing a comment
      Thanks, I appreciate the reply. It doesn't answer the question. Can I go for a 15s battery, only charge it to 80% so I can keep a nominal voltage Above 48 and close to 52 and will this hurt my motor (1000w Luna rear hub) going a little over 52v. I guess I don't know what the nominal voltage is to a 15s Li-io battery only charged to 80%. 55.5v ???

    #3
    Hello orcasmarx@yahoo.com

    ​The magic numbers for battery calculations are 3 and 4.2 the low voltage and high voltage values. So..... a 15s battery max charge is 15 x 4.2 = 63. Low voltage cutoff is 15 x 3 = 45

    Now this is how I figure it, calculate the voltage range and divide by 10 that will give you 10% use that value to figure percentage you want. In this case the high - low voltage is 63 - 45 = 18 that would give us 1.8 volts; so.... 7 * 1.8 = 12.6v add that to the low volts value 45 + 12.6 = 57.6 that gives me a 70% charge of a 15s pack = 57.6.

    On that basis you should be able to charge your 15s pack with a charger set for a 14s pack. But I know nothing about electricity - amps, watts, volts those sort of things. Good luck,

    btw I have the 72v Satiator from Grin. They work great!

    Comment


    • orcasmarx@yahoo.com
      Editing a comment
      Do they still have the 72v available? Did you purchase it from Grin? I had planned on buying the 60v Statiator but if the 72v is available better yet. At this point I am not going after mass speed. I want to be able to stay around the 1400w my motor ((Luna 1000w rear hub) is capable of and go farther on my battery back. I mainly do commute riding but carry lots of stuff. I put over 400 miles a month on my cheap Chinese ebike 300w. I am building my own wheels and have everything to build my own batteries (spot welder etc.). When I go to a full suspension system (Enduro frame) I plan on getting a small trailer. I greatly appreciate the advice. I had my figures mixed up (nominal and full charge). The Grin Satiator page states a 18650 battery full charge is 4.2v and 4.05v at 80% charge. 14x4.05=58.7v. So I guess for now the 14s pack will do. Less than a year ago I knew nothing about ebikes or bikes for that matter. Any way thanks again.

    #4
    They did a small production run of the 72v units, the one I have is not CE certified or as waterproof as the 48v. I was having trouble charging batteries from Hi Power Cycles their 52v packs would not charge at all with the Satiator. Grin offered to exchange it to see if the charger was defective. That is when I heard about the 72v model. I knew I was going to get some larger packs so I asked them for one of the 72v ones, they said sure and mailed it to me. The only thing was they wanted me to be aware that it was technically a beta unit. It failed to charge the HPC batteries. After some discussion both units were returned to Grin for evaluation. They contacted HPC for a test battery to troubleshoot the problem. HPC wouldn't send them one, I don't know the details. I offered to send them one but with all the hoverboard problems they told they could not receive a lithium battery shipped to them from me. Go figure. Anyway they made some changes and returned the satiators to me. The 48v model still will not charge any HPC battery that I own and I have 4 of them. the 72v unit on the other hand has no problem and charges them as expected, no force necessary.

    Call them on the phone ask about the 72v model. I now have one charger that charges my 52v, my 60v and my 78v batteries. Very convenient. Pricey but worth it if you're into it.

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      #5
      I think the idea of oversizing the pack and using less than full capacity is sound, in terms of increasing pack life. If you only ever plan to charge to 80%, make sure you have a BMS that will continuously balance, or a charging solution to balance the pack once in a while. If the Satiator will let you do a full charge, then discharge to 80%, that would work.
      Fabrication is fun! Build something today. Show someone. Let them help. Inspire and share. Spread the desire.

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