When buying an ebike or ebike component and the shipment arrives, there are some general guidelines to follow to ensure you have the best customer experience possible.

Inspection
Open the package and inspect what was sent.
  • Is it what you ordered
  • Does it contain all the parts
  • Is everything intact and in good condition
Bench Testing
Test what you have been sent, even if not using the part yet for installation or operation.
  • If you ordered a kit, you do not need to install the kit to know if it works. Often you can simply wire up battery to controller and hit throttle to check that it is working.
  • If you ordered a battery, verify it can both take charge and discharge. If it uses a keyed lock check that the key opens the lock.
  • If you ordered a charger, plug it in.
  • If you ordered a bike, power it on and ride it around the block.
Contact
If there is an issue, contact the seller right away.
Do not wait months to contact the seller before telling them an item was DOA or broken right out of the box; this is not how a claim of something being DOA works.

At Luna if something is broken or DOA and the product just arrived we are authorized to do a lot more to help get things worked out than if the item was stored for many months in a garage, or something of that nature and we simply have to take someone's word that the product arrived like that. Likely it is the same for any other company as well, especially with something that can be easily abused like ebike components.

DO NOT:
Do not modify parts until testing them as they were originally designed.
This includes but is not limited to: cutting off connectors, rewiring to other components, sawing into brackets, overvolting controllers.
Do not throw away a big custom shipping box unless you are sure the parts work as expected, if you toss a box it is on you to find a new one, best a retailer can do is send a label.

Note on serial numbers:
Most online retailers of bikes do not have a record of the specific serial for a given bike sold to a customer. If your bike has a serial number it is your responsibility to write this down (and ideally take pictures) in case the bike ever gets stolen so it can be used for reference in insurance claims or police reports.