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BBSHD teardown, maintenance and greasing

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  • Retrorockit
    replied
    I've removed bearing like that. Be sure you can get new bearings. I remove the guts from it so just the shell is left. Then using a Dremel tool or die grinder grind a slot along the inside of the shell to remove the press fit from the bearing. You don't have to grind all the way into the housing. Just break the last bit inwards with an angled punch. If you do scratch the housing it's OK just sand it smooth and the new bearing will bridge the gap. You can used fine threaded rod with nuts and washers and a couple sockets to press the new bearings in. You can try to fold it in with a punch so it's heart shaped, but if it's hardened you will need to grind it.
    Wear eye protection when chiseling or grinding.

    Leave a comment:


  • Valerio
    commented on 's reply
    Thanks a lot calfee20 , I found some rust remover and working on it! Greetings from Singapore

  • calfee20
    replied
    Originally posted by Valerio View Post

    Hi calfee20 thanks for the tip,
    which solvent would you use? I really have to remove the rust patina and make it work again cause its really stuck, thats why I wanted to remove it
    Carburetor cleaner or Brake cleaner then switch to a good rust penetrant like PB blaster. I don't know if you have that over there. Can you get a finger in there to see how the rollers feel without cutting yourself up? If it feels good it should last for a while but it could damage the shaft that rides in there so it is your call. I would use grease with a high moly content. I have some leftover VW CV joint grease from the 70's so something like that.

    Leave a comment:


  • Valerio
    replied
    Originally posted by calfee20 View Post

    Leave it in there. Clean it out with solvent and air. Then work grease into it.
    Hi calfee20 thanks for the tip,
    which solvent would you use? I really have to remove the rust patina and make it work again cause its really stuck, thats why I wanted to remove it

    Leave a comment:


  • calfee20
    replied
    Originally posted by Valerio View Post
    Hello guys,

    How the hell I remove the needle bearings in the pics below?
    one of them is stuck and I want to remove it and clean it to see if I can save it while I wait for the spare replacement delivery,
    please let me know, I am stuck!
    Leave it in there. Clean it out with solvent and air. Then work grease into it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Valerio
    replied
    Hello guys,

    How the hell I remove the needle bearings in the pics below?
    one of them is stuck and I want to remove it and clean it to see if I can save it while I wait for the spare replacement delivery,
    please let me know, I am stuck!

    Leave a comment:


  • BBassett
    replied
    Is there any shop that is rebuilding BBSXX motors? I would rather swap mine for another and send it out to be rebuilt. That's just the way I am. When my wife wanted breast enlargement surgery I sent her out too.

    Leave a comment:


  • paxtana
    replied
    There are YouTube videos how to remove the seal on a sealed bearing with a pick. That bearing is pressed in though, if it is messed up a replacement secondary comes with another pressed in place

    Leave a comment:


  • Stu Summer
    replied
    I took off the secondary gear cover (behind the chainring) to clean and add grease. Found the sealed bearing cartridge that one sees from the outside (chainring side) of the unit is rocky--rough, like the grease was washed out of it. How do I pull it out of the cover and can I have a spec on a replacement bearing? Thanks.

    Leave a comment:


  • calfee20
    commented on 's reply
    Use sparingly

  • Sebz
    commented on 's reply
    Humm never heard of that, I will have to try it! Thx!

  • calfee20
    replied
    Originally posted by CoMoBiker View Post
    I wonder if blue RTV would work instead of a gasket. Many automotive assemblies use the stuff these days.
    Honda bond!! Lifetime auto-mechanic here and this is the best that I have used.

    https://www.amazon.com/Genuine-Honda...3107926&sr=8-2

    Leave a comment:


  • paxtana
    replied
    I think if you did not want to use the original gasket for some reason, or needed to replace it and could not get the OEM gasket, That any gasket compound would hypothetically be doable. As well as the typical gasket maker kits you can find online that are paper/rubber/whatever which you mount and then trim the edges with an Xacto knife.

    Leave a comment:


  • CoMoBiker
    replied
    I wonder if blue RTV would work instead of a gasket. Many automotive assemblies use the stuff these days.

    Leave a comment:


  • Scoonie
    replied
    Originally posted by utsebike View Post
    I live in Australia and it's expensive to get Mobil 28. Most suppliers you must by a commercial amount and trying to order off ebay to send to Australia is expensive. There is a local product in australia made by Inox and the model is MX6. It is clay based, PTFE, non hardening, food based grease used in the food and beverage manufacturing for sprockets, machinery, conveyor lines, o rings, bushes splines etc. I have used it in my car's power window plastic sliders and after 6 years, it's still soft and not hard like other greases people use.

    Whats other's opinion on this stuff?
    Lithium-based is more appropriate.

    http://www.eclubes.com.au/products/v...bilith-shc-100

    Here's Mobile 28 in Australia

    http://www.eclubes.com.au/products/v...mobilgrease-28

    Mobilith SHC 100 greases from Acculube are superior performance products for a wide variety of applications at extremes of temperature. They combine synthetic base fluids with high quality lithium complex thickener. The wax-free nature of synthetic fluids and the low coefficient of traction (compared with mineral oils), provide excellent low temperature pumpability and very low starting and running torque. Mobilith SHC 100 Electric Motor Greases can reduce operating temperatures in the load zone of spherical roller and ball bearings. Their lithium complex thickener contributes excellent adhesion, structural stability and resistance to water.

    These greases have a high chemical stability, and additives that provide both excellent protection against wear, rust and corrosion, and operating viscosity at high and low temperatures
    Last edited by Scoonie; 02-29-2020, 11:51 AM.

    Leave a comment:

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