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Testing Batteries for a Gio Ebike - what is the best way?

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    Testing Batteries for a Gio Ebike - what is the best way?

    Looking for some advice to test the four batteries on my Gio Ebike. The bike is in parts ,but I want to test out the batteries.

    #2
    What sort of test do you want to do? Do you have any electrical tools or skills?

    Comment


      #3
      Thank you for the reply. I am a diy person, but not really versed in jargon.
      The batteries a t 4x12v but I better back-up a bit .
      The charger doesn't seem to work.
      Does the charger light up or does the fan work even when not plugged into the ebike?
      I might need a new charger first.

      Comment


        #4
        Can you post some pics? I don't know anything about that brand or model so maybe if we could see what you are working with we could give you some guidance on ways to troubleshoot.

        Comment


          #5
          Click image for larger version

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ID:	148455Yes here are some pics
          Attached Files

          Comment


            #6
            Here's a few comments for what they're worth:
            • You probably have 4 x 12V lead acid batteries
            • These are to be connected in series to give a nominal 48V delivered to he controller
            • As for charging, this is normally done as "bulk charging" with a 48V charger, specifically for lead acid packs
            • Most (but not all) chargers will have a light that is red when charging (and the fan runs) and turns green when fully charged
            • If the charger is plugged in with no load (battery) connected, the fan will not run and the light would normally be green
            • To test if the charger is working, you can plug it in and check the output voltage with a multimeter
            If you do conclude the batteries are no good, my suggestion would be to abandon the SLA system and go lithium.

            Comment


              #7
              Thank you.
              So far, I have tested the individual batteries and they all have 12.5+ charge on them. The bike propels itself and the left turn signal work.

              The charger - when plugged in, the light does not go on at all. When plugged in and connected to the ebike, the light does not go on at all.
              I will have to use my electrical outlet tester on the female end of the charger when plugged tomorrow to see if there is an charge coming through. Is that the best way to check the charger?

              I think the batteries are good for now, but once they are drained I will have to re-investigate it.

              I am trying to find the manual for this bike. I think it is 2010 Gio, but google searches for this exact model are not coming up.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by netrate View Post
                Thank you.
                So far, I have tested the individual batteries and they all have 12.5+ charge on them. The bike propels itself and the left turn signal work.
                When fully charged a normal lead-acid battery in good condition should have 13.5 volts across the terminals. Yours are drained down to 12.5 and that's OK for a while but you don't want to drain them down to 11 volts unless you can recharge them very soon. Around 11 volts the sulphur in the electrolyte (sulphuric acid) begins to precipitate quickly onto the lead plates which ruins the battery. Even at 12 volts the sulphation process occurs but much slower.

                Originally posted by netrate View Post
                The charger - when plugged in, the light does not go on at all. When plugged in and connected to the ebike, the light does not go on at all.
                I will have to use my electrical outlet tester on the female end of the charger when plugged tomorrow to see if there is an charge coming through. Is that the best way to check the charger?
                Maybe the light is burned out?

                Not 100% sure what you mean by "electrical outlet tester" but if it's what I think it is then it's for checking the 110 volts AC wall sockets in your home. Unless it has capabilities I am not aware of then it's useless for testing the charger output accurately. Well, OK, it might indicate the charger is putting voltage on the output but you need to know accurately how much voltage it's putting out. For that you need a DC voltmeter or a multimeter set to measure DC voltage, not AC voltage, DC voltage. It sounds like you have one because above you claim "the individual batteries all have 12.5+ charge on them". BTW we're talking volts here not charge. Charge and volts are related but they are not the same thing.

                One way (but not the best way) to check the charger is plug it into the AC outlet but not into the bike. Then check the output voltage on the plug that connects to the bike. If it's a dumb charger and it's working then you'll see voltage there. If it's a smart charger and it's working then it won't put voltage to the connector unless it's plugged into the bike or it senses some load at the connector.

                The best way to test the charger (even if it's a dumb charger) is to test it's output voltage under load. By under load I mean connected to the battery. It might produce the required voltage when it's not under load but fail under load. If that all makes sense to you so far then at this point you should be asking "what voltage is required on the connector under load". That depends on how many pins are in the connector that goes into the bike.

                A 2 pin connector would indicate the system is designed to charge the 4 batteries in series in which case you would expect no less than 55 volts DC across the 2 pins and it might be as high as 60 volts. Why 55 to 60 when 4 X 12 = 48? Well, it's because batteries have internal resistance and the 12 volt designation is just nominal.

                A 5 pin connector would indicate the system is designed to charge the 4 batteries in parallel. If so then 4 pins will be + (positive), 1 pin will be ground (-), and you can expect no less than 14 volts on each of the 4 + pins, could be as high as 16 volts.

                Odds are it's a 2 pin connector series charging circuit but ya never know.

                Originally posted by netrate View Post
                I think the batteries are good for now, but once they are drained I will have to re-investigate it.
                As mentioned above, don't drain them much below 12 volts unless you can recharge them right away. Sulphation is NOT reversible. If you don't get it sorted soon then consider charging the batteries back to 13.5 volts using a 12 volt automotive battery charger. Warning: if the batteries are connected in series then you MUST isolate them and charge them individually. To isolate them you must disconnect them from each other.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Ok, I think I need to slow down a bit and go step by step. BTW, thank you for such a thorough response.
                  On the ebike, the indicator panel on the steering wheel says "Full". So far so good. I know there are some electrical problems that I will have to tackle in the future, but I better start with making sure the charger is working. Here is the AC tester I was using (attached). After using it and getting some information that an AC tester probably won't work on a DC converter, I am back to square one trying to determine if the charger is working or not.
                  The Yellow is the digital multi-meter or voltmeter (I am unsure of the name of it). The Yellow voltmeter is what I used to test each battery.
                  Attached Files

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by netrate View Post
                    Ok, I think I need to slow down a bit and go step by step. BTW, thank you for such a thorough response.
                    Thank you. I must add all responders in this thread have provided very appropriate and accurate info. Indeed I covered a lot of ground in my response and I had a feeling you would want to slow it down a bit. I agree so let's go step by step and a little slower now :)
                    Originally posted by netrate View Post
                    On the ebike, the indicator panel on the steering wheel says "Full".
                    If you measured 12.5vdc (12.5 volts DC) then it's so close to full it's not entirely wrong to say it's full but it's not entirely right either. Full to the brim = 13.5 volts.

                    Remember the 12 volt designation is only nominal not what a healthy 12 volt lead-acid battery should have when fully charged. Nominal derives from name. They name it 12 volt simply to distinguish it from other lead-acid batteries, eg. 6 volt motorcycle batteries. A healthy fully charged 6 volt lead-acid battery will show about 7.5vdc on a meter. The name "12 volt" simply tells you the battery and circuits using a 12 volt battery are designed to work at approx. 12 volts, a little higher/lower is OK. Similarly the name "6 volt" tells you it will work around around 6 volts. They have to give them a name in the catalogs so customers have an idea of what they're looking at. They could name 6 volt batteries "weak batteries" and 12 volt batteries "stronger batteries". 1.5 volt batteries would be named perhaps "even weaker". A 48 volt battery could be called "arse kicker" but then what do you call a 72 volt battery... kicks crap out of an arse kicker? No, they name them 1.5, 6, 12, 36, 48 and 72 with the understanding that they work well at slightly higher/lower voltages and when fully charged they are higher than the nominal voltage. Mechanics, electricians, etc. all understand that and hopefully you understand it now too or at least can accept it even if doesn't make sense to you at this point. OK, let's move on.

                    Originally posted by netrate View Post
                    ... I better start with making sure the charger is working.
                    Yes. And to do that you have to ignore what the light on the charger is doing because it might be burned out. Ignore what the fan is doing too because it might not run until the charger warms up or it might be fried or maybe one of the wires feeding power to the fan is not connected or the connection is corroded. Trust only what your meter/tester tells you. So the question is.... which one of those 2 meters/testers should you work with and trust?

                    The red/grey unit is more capable than I thought it would be. The units I am familiar with are AC only and all they do is illluminate a light if voltage is present and within certain limits. They don't tell you what they voltage is. You need more than that and yours may very well have a display that tells you what the voltage is and whether it's DC or AC. If it tells you all that then it will do fine. A nice feature is that the probe is incorporated into the unit which makes it easier to use.

                    The yellow multimeter is harder to use because you need both hands just to operate the probes. Meanwhile the display might be sitting in a position where you can't see it when you move your head to operate the probes. Then you have to put a probe down and re-position the display. But if the red/grey unit doesn't tell you exactly what the voltage is then I would go with the multi-meter. You'll soon remember to position the display where it will be easy to read when you use the probes. Having an alligator clip on the ground probe frees up 1 hand.

                    Originally posted by netrate View Post
                    Here is the AC tester I was using (attached). After using it and getting some information that an AC tester probably won't work on a DC converter, I am back to square one trying to determine if the charger is working or not.
                    Can you spin the fan with a finger or pencil? If it doesn't spin then it's ceased and probably needs replacing though a drop or 2 of light oil on the bearings might free it up. Don't over oil and wipe off any excess. If not then consider replacing it but only if the charger will put charge into the batteries, more on that below. It's likely a fan commonly used in laptops/desktops you can find for $10 at Amazon. If it does spin freely then it might simply be that it's on a thermostat and won't run until the charger warms up (power saving feature).

                    You can also direct an external fan into the charger while checking if the charger puts charge into the batteries.

                    Connect the charger to mains. You can run it for 30 seconds without a fan without damaging it. If you get any voltage at all that's a good sign but 0 voltage doesn't prove it's broken. Could be it needs to sense a load (in other words batteries) before it outputs any voltage at all.

                    Now connect the charger to the bike. Ignore the light. Check if the charger becomes too hot to touch. Sniff the air for the odour of overheating electronics. If that's all OK then let it run for a few hours but keep checking for signs of overheating every 5 minutes or so. If no overheating in the first hour then check less frequently. Periodically check the voltage at the batteries too. According to your earlier post you now read 12.5 volts on 1 battery. If the charger is charging then the voltage at any individual battery should climb slow but steady to 13.5 volts at which point it is fully charged. That might take several hours. At that point you should see 4 X 13.5 = 54 volts from the + post of the first battery in the series to the - post of the last battery in the series. You might see less than 54 due to unavoidable deterioration of the batteries over time or it could be the charger's output voltage is less than it should be. Worry about that if and when you get to it. Even 48 volts might be good enough for your needs. Torque and range will suffer but good enuff is good enuff.

                    If the voltage at the batteries rises then at some point the fan should run if you've determined it isn't ceased. If it doesn't then check fan connections inside the charger. If the voltage never rises above the current 12.5 then check the plug and cord from the mains and the output leads to the battery. You can use the ohmmeter in your multimeter to see if there is a break in any of those wires (called a continuity check).


                    Comment


                      #11
                      1) The fan moves freely with my fingers, no issues there.
                      2) Ok I will try and charge the batteries .

                      CHARGING EDIT #1: I left it charging for over an hour : no fan, and DID NOT get hot or even warm.

                      I checked the battery prior to charging, it was 12.84, after the hour of "charging", it was 12.84

                      __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ _____________________________
                      Continuity tester - do you mean this?
                      How to Make a Continuity Test at home using led, battery and probe for test any circuitwe make video on magic trick also and computer repairing also.plz wat...

                      __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ ______________________________

                      EDIT 2: I made an LED continuity battery tester. Tried it first on an completely different extension cord to make sure it worked. Then I tried it on the charger.

                      CHARGER :
                      Male End - ran from the male end to the where the cord enters into the circuit board - tried it on both prongs, LED lit up.
                      Female End - ran from the female end to where the cord meets the circuit board again - tried it and the LED lit up.
                      Lastly, tried to running from the MALE end to the FEMALE end using the LED - did not work BUT this could be because the charger needs to be powered to allow current to flow through completely, but I am not an electrician or a electronics person so that is a guess. So far it doesn't seem like the two cord ends are the issue.

                      I have to also consider that there might be a fault leading from the charge input on the bike to the batteries. Maybe it isn't the charger at all, but a loose wire that connects from the ebike outlet to the batteries. I will need to follow the wires need and see.

                      EDIT 3 : just curious if this is a breaker or the fuse and I am unsure which way this should be flipped. It is under the bike seat
                      Attached Files
                      Last edited by netrate; 03-05-2022, 07:26 AM.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by netrate View Post
                        1) The fan moves freely with my fingers, no issues there.
                        2) Ok I will try and charge the batteries .

                        CHARGING EDIT #1: I left it charging for over an hour : no fan, and DID NOT get hot or even warm.

                        I checked the battery prior to charging, it was 12.84, after the hour of "charging", it was 12.84

                        __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ _____________________________
                        Continuity tester - do you mean this?
                        How to Make a Continuity Test at home using led, battery and probe for test any circuitwe make video on magic trick also and computer repairing also.plz wat...

                        __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ ______________________________
                        Definitely no charging happening but we don't know why. But we're gonna find out.

                        Yes, that's a continuity tester but you can probably use your multimeter to do continuity tests, I would be very surprised if it doesn't have that function because all modern multimeters have it. You just need to turn the function dial to the correct position. That position will be in the "ohms" section on the function dial. There is a battery inside the multimeter. Touching the probes together when the dial is at the proper position allows current from that battery to flow through the probes to a buzzer/beeper (or maybe just an LED). So it's just the same basic circuit you built from scratch but conveniently packaged in a multimeter. If yours does not have a buzzer/beeper/ LED then touching the probes together when the function dial is anywhere in the "ohms" section will cause the display to change from "1" (infinite resistance) to 0 which means no resistance, in other words continuity. Put a length of good wire between the probes and it will again show 0. A bad (discontinuous) wire will show 1 on the display. A resistor between the probes will show a number that corresponds to that resistor's resistance. Your multimeter's user manual might explain more and there are likely YouTube vids that explain all the handy things you can do with the ohmmeter in your multimeter. Caution: never connect the probes to a voltage source (eg. battery) with the meter's function dial set to measure resistance because it will fry your meter maybe even blow it up! Most meters have builtin protection against that but some do not.

                        Originally posted by netrate View Post
                        EDIT 2: I made an LED continuity battery tester. Tried it first on an completely different extension cord to make sure it worked. Then I tried it on the charger.

                        CHARGER :
                        Male End - ran from the male end to the where the cord enters into the circuit board - tried it on both prongs, LED lit up.
                        Female End - ran from the female end to where the cord meets the circuit board again - tried it and the LED lit up.
                        OK, so we know charger is getting power from the mains. You could have done that just by checking the voltage (should be 110 AC). I like checking with a continuity test or ohmmeter because that involves low voltage rather than higher voltage. Also, it's easier/safer to jiggle the wire around to see if moving it causes discontinuity. That's a tricky fault not easily detected but it does happen.

                        Originally posted by netrate View Post
                        Lastly, tried to running from the MALE end to the FEMALE end using the LED - did not work BUT this could be because the charger needs to be powered to allow current to flow through completely, but I am not an electrician or a electronics person so that is a guess. So far it doesn't seem like the two cord ends are the issue.
                        Possibly a diode between the male and female. A diode allows DC to flow only in one direction to protect against connecting the charging leads backwards (+ to - instead of + to + and - to -). If you didn't check polarity when you connected your continuity checker then there's a 50/50 chance you connected it backwards. If so then reversing polarity might have caused the LED to light up. If it doesn't light up on either polarity then either:
                        1. the diode is fried, OR
                        2. there is no diode but rather a relay in the output circuit
                        If it's a relay then something else in charger verifies it's connected properly (correct polarity) and if it is then the charger closes the relay and current flows to battery(s). Simply reversing polraity on your continuity checker won't close the relay. But what you can do is check continuity from the female back to the circuit board as well as from the male back to the circuit board. If both those wires are continuous then you have boiled it down to something inside the charger.

                        If it's a bad diode and you're down for an adventure, it wouldn't be hard to locate that bad diode, desolder one end from the circuit board and then check it. In a nutshell... if it doesn't pass current at the proper voltage in either direction then it's fried. You would then desolder the other end and solder in a good one. Not any old diode would do, you have to get the specs on the original and order the right one. They're about a dollar and available from numerous sources. That might make the charger work. But if there are other bad components on the circuit board then it won't work. Might be cheaper and easier just to get a new charger or just use a standard 12V automotive charger to charge the battery(s) in parallel. That could be a bit of a PITA if they are connected in series to give 48 volts to the motor. But if it's a 12V motor (not likely considering the weight of machine and rider) then maybe the batteries are in parallel and all you would have to do is raise the seat, remove the battery box cover and clamp the charging wires directly to battery terminals.

                        Originally posted by netrate View Post
                        I have to also consider that there might be a fault leading from the charge input on the bike to the batteries. Maybe it isn't the charger at all, but a loose wire that connects from the ebike outlet to the batteries. I will need to follow the wires need and see.
                        You are a troubleshooter in the making. Follow your instincts but always wear safety glasses because sooner or later you're gonna make something spark and smoke. It's the only way to learn on your own. A fire extinguisher designed for electrical fires might be a good idea too. And smoke detectors too. Your insurance agent doesn't need to know what you're up to.

                        Originally posted by netrate View Post
                        EDIT 3 : just curious if this is a breaker or the fuse and I am unsure which way this should be flipped. It is under the bike seat
                        It could be just a simple on/off switch hidden under the seat to deter theft.

                        I've never seen a fuse together with a switch so I'm pretty sure it's a circuit breaker if not a switch. Either way, it could be the problem. If it's a breaker (let's assume it is for now)and it's working properly then the switch will move eagerly from closed to open (on to off) because the lever is assisted by a spring in that direction. In the other direction (open to closed, i.e. off to on) you have to push against the spring so it will be harder than the other direction. If it's in the open position you usually have to push it all the way in that direction to engage all the internal levers and what-nots inside before pushing to the closed position, same as resetting a tripped mains breaker.

                        No matter if it's switch/fuse/breaker, check it with your continuity checker. If it doesn't conduct with the switch in either position then it or the wires in/out of it needs replacement.

                        Experience has taught me that in a non-working electrical system it's often not just a single component that needs to be fixed/replaced. Frequently there is a domino effect and 2 or more components get fried all at the same time. For example the diode I mentioned earlier. That might be just one component in a chain of components that all failed one after the other due to... well, we don't know what might have started it all. We don't even know where that diode is in the chain of events. It might be in the middle in which case we have to work towards both ends of the chain. It's a test of one's ability to think logically and NEVER assume too much. If you're down for that then you'll eventually either fix it back to new condition or kludge it (works but it's not original the way it came from the factory).

                        Another consideration..... what shape are the batteries in. If the charger is broken AND the batteries are on their last leg then it might not be worth fixing. Might be better to convert it to lithium because lithium has superior charge density which means you can pump more electrons into a smaller and lighter battery compared to lead/acid. If the batteries are not sealed then you'll be able to open each cell and test the specific gravity of the acid in each cell using a hygrometer. Combined with other info specific gravity can tell you lot about a battery's condition. You might find 3 of your 4 are good but 1 is bad and won't take much charge. That alone wouldn't stop them all from charging, however, but it is useful to know when deciding how much you want to invest in restoring what you have to working condition. That involves more detail than I have time for today but Google will turn up all you need to know if search for lead-acid battery maintenance.

                        But then what shape is the rest of the machine in and what would it cost to convert to lithium? Lots of fun, learning and satisfaction in DIYing it. Depends on time, budget and how many new tools you need to buy and learn how to use properly, how may risks you're willing to take on blowing something up or electrocute yourself. Never forget you're dealing with batteries here. They store up lots of energy. One slip, one accidental bypass of builtin protections and all that energy unleashes in milliseconds like a bomb.
                        Last edited by AltaBrad; 03-06-2022, 10:10 AM.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Ok, I will go through what you said step by step and report back as I go - as there is a lot to take in. As usual, you have been massively thorough and helpful.

                          Here is an update:

                          1) Somehow I got the charger to work - but briefly. Now, I don't know if it has anything to do with 1) the charger itself 2) the wires in the bike 3) the batteries. After playing with the wires and trying to determine which wire did what inside of the bike, I continued to run the charger. Suddenly, the green light went on (the fan did not) but it disappeared in about 3 seconds. I got this to repeat once more, but again the light only stayed on briefly.

                          2) Canadian Tire does not have the ability to check the load on my batteries. I brought them in today and they said they don't have the machine for those type of batteries. (At this point I should show a picture of them.)

                          3) Going to try the scoot shop for the battery load test on Tuesday as the only one in town is closed Sun Mon and only works through appointments.

                          Attached Files

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by netrate View Post
                            Ok, I will go through what you said step by step and report back as I go - as there is a lot to take in. As usual, you have been massively thorough and helpful.

                            Here is an update:

                            1) Somehow I got the charger to work - but briefly. Now, I don't know if it has anything to do with 1) the charger itself 2) the wires in the bike 3) the batteries. After playing with the wires and trying to determine which wire did what inside of the bike, I continued to run the charger. Suddenly, the green light went on (the fan did not) but it disappeared in about 3 seconds. I got this to repeat once more, but again the light only stayed on briefly.
                            Sounds like you're jiggling the wires around with the charger plugged in and connected and the green light operates intermittently. That screams "bad connection" somewhere. For some reason I assumed you had already done that before asking for advice here. Really that's where we should have started but oh well.

                            First suspect on the list is the charger-bike connector. I bet the female half of the connector is a barrel with 1 or more slits that allow the barrel to expand slightly when you push the male half into it. Because they can be very tight and difficult to disconnect, users tend to flex the connector back and forth when diconnecting. That spreads the 2 halves of the barrel beyond the point where it can spring back and clamp tightly on the male half. Add a little corrosion on both the male and female sides and you end up with a connection that heats up due to resistance. The heat softens the metal and it loses it springiness and refuses to clamp tight on the male half. Next charge it gets even hotter and softer which adds more resistance. Next it's so loose it's arcing between male and female surfaces which deposits more oxides which creates more resistance. It just snowballs. Pieces of the barrrel can burn right off and fall out when you separate the 2 halves. Eventually it has so much resistance it won't pass much current if any at all. The charger senses that and refuses to turn on.

                            The fix.... shine a bright light into the barrel and look in, I bet it's a dull grey color inside, maybe pitted due to arcing, maybe blueish/black due to severe overheating. It should be bright and shiny. Could be paint in there, bubble gum, moth cocoon, racoon snot, whatever. Portions could be burned clean off which renders it unsalvageble. If pitted due to arcing it's not salvageable. If it's just dirty/tarnished then clean the male half with a soft wire brush or fine sandpaper. Clean the female half with a slender file or wrap sandpaper around a small drill bit or an ink tube pulled out of a pen, a piece of coat hanger works too. Or just wrap a strip of sandpaper into a cylinder. Shove it in and spin it around and work it in and out too. Shake the dust out as you go. When both halves look nice and shiny you're done cleaning.

                            Now check the shape of the barrel. Check the slits in the sides of the barrel. If the slits get wider near the opening then the barrel has been stretched open by flexing the connector halves to get them apart. It will be tapered. If it is then see if you can gently squeeze it with pliers until the slits are uniform along their length. Go easy, if you squeeze too much you'll distort it to the point that the male half won't go in.

                            Or just snip it off and replace it with a 2 prong trailer connector. Canadian tire will have what you need. The female side should connect to battery + terminal so it can't short against the bike frame which might be grounded. Solder the connections, insulate with 1 layer of small diameter shrink tube over each soldered joint and a larger diameter that envelopes both solder joints and holds them together like the outermost layer on extension cord.

                            The wires between the battery terminals are also suspect. Check where the wire goes into the lug, looking for green "root rot" indicative of copper oxidised by acids forming at the terminals. That acid will eat clean through the copper wire over time. High humidity accelerates the process and you're near the Great Lakes in Hamilton, right? Grip the connector lugs with pliers and see if you can pull them off the wire. Sometimes the copper is rotted clean through leaving the lugs hanging on by the skin of their teeth. If you wiggle them they'll connect intermittently and conduct sufficiently to make a charger go on for a few secs but when flexed differently the connection breaks.

                            See if the battery posts themselves are snug. If you can jiggle them at all then that's your problem or at least part of it. A loose post is not fixable and it will break the circuit entirely if too loose. If snug then clean the posts and connecting lugs with fine sandpaper. Don't get any of that dust in your eyes because it'll burn right through your eyeball. Neutralise it with a baking soda-water solution. Don't wipe your itchy eyes with your fingers as they might be carrying that corrosive dust. Those are sealed batteries but they gotta have a tiny vent hole somewhere. If you dump a lot of baking soda water solution on the battery it could work through the vent hole into the battery and neutralize the acid inside. Depending how much gets in there could be a violent chemical reaction. Best to wet a rag with the solution and wipe rather than just dumping it all over like so many people do.

                            Originally posted by netrate View Post
                            2) Canadian Tire does not have the ability to check the load on my batteries. I brought them in today and they said they don't have the machine for those type of batteries. (At this point I should show a picture of them.)

                            3) Going to try the scoot shop for the battery load test on Tuesday as the only one in town is closed Sun Mon and only works through appointments.
                            Google "how load test a battery". Seems you can DIY. I dunno I've never done it or paid anybody to do it. I just take very good care of my lead-acid batteries and they last a loooooong time that way. I know without a load test when it's time to replace a lead-acid battery just from the way it performs. I've had too many shops try to sell me stuff to replace stuff that isn't broken or worn out. If they're selling the stuff they're testing then I don't trust them. YMMV

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Brad, first off - how are you so knowledgeable?? My god man, I am floored each time I check this forum with the amount of information you have "at the ready"!

                              1) Attached is a picture of the charger barrel - I am going to clean it and the female end of the charger cord using what you have suggested.
                              2) Load charge is something that I was told to check by other ebike enthusiasts. Being new, I didn't know either way. I will try my own DIY and also take into a shop. I guess it can't hurt to do both.

                              The "two prong connectors" must be called something different or more specific, because after multiple searches, I can only find this : https://www.aliexpress.com/item/32867889454.html

                              3) Wiring - I had jiggled the wires originally, but with anything "new" experience, I was doing it casually and not with any thoroughness. Now that I am a bit more familiar, I took more time to pull on the wires and check.

                              EDIT : it is cold out in the garage, so I could only tinker for about 30 minutes. Cleaned the inside of the barrel and the female end of the cord, still not working. Couldn't even get the charger to turn on at all. Played with the wires for a bit, but nothing. I am wondering if there is a fault in the barrel as well and maybe a loose wire. I will check again tomorrow.
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                              Last edited by netrate; 03-07-2022, 04:53 PM.

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