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    #16
    I assume the new tube fits against the rim? So you are mostly riding on the liner? What shape is the groove in the liner for the tube?

    Comment


    • Retrorockit
      Retrorockit commented
      Editing a comment
      It just takes about a 1/2" smaller size tube. The liner is 15mm under the tread, and 2mm at each sidewall. Basically round.
      Here's their chart for this.
      https://tannusamerica.com/pages/size-chart
      A couple things that could throw the sizing off are tires that include a flat protection layer already.,and tires with knobs that make the casing air volume smaller for their external size.
      This will result in the sidewall flaps being too long and bunching up in the drop section of the rim making mounting very difficult

    • Retrorockit
      Retrorockit commented
      Editing a comment
      There's a cutaway of it here. i found them for less other places.
      https://tannusamerica.com/products/t...31871978373231

    #17
    This Tannus project has been very rewarding for me. I will assume I actually have better flat protection. But the lower rear tire pressure experiment has really paid off on my 26" hardtail.
    Smoother and quieter at high speeds. Losing my envy of 29ers. Can put down more power through turns, especially bumpy ones. I'm actually tuning out all the rattles from racks, locks, and fenders that I thought were just part of going fast on a hardtail. Considering that I have the power and battery to ride 20+MPH sitting upright into 25MPH headwinds, worrying about rolling resistance seems kind of silly. So another old pedal bike habit unlearned

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    • AZguy
      AZguy commented
      Editing a comment
      I noticed my wheels were out-of-true, especially the rear (clearly took some hits!) so threw the bike on the stand to true and realized I've been getting a lot more life out of the tires I have now so figured I'd replace the stans... poured the old stans out of the tubes and it looked nothing like it did going in, more like oil than the white stinky stuff when fresh... turned the tires inside out and trimmed all the pointy things before remounting

      Not bad for a year and a half plus tho

      Have to admit I don't know why some folks seem afraid of truing their wheels, it's silly easy and only "special" tool needed is a spoke wrench... went ahead and balanced them just 'cus I was there, I don't think it makes a difference really, more to satisfy my OCD =]

    • Retrorockit
      Retrorockit commented
      Editing a comment
      It's probably just the carbon black leaching out if the tubes.
      My wheels are staying true, (except for once when some guy doing a burnout in reverse cliiped my rear wheel) but I noticed a dry sound from one of my pedals.Tore them down for a lube, and found they are both bent down a bit. Or up depending on where the crank is. But I'n pretty sure down is where it happened.
      I put a wrap of duct tape on my CO2 cartridges to stop them form banging around inside the rear rack tube where I hide them. Might keep them form freezing to my fingers when I use them.

    #18
    First flat tire with the Tannus LOL. No hole in the brand new Scwalbe Big Ben Plus. No hole in the Tannus either. Stan's all over the place (not too bad really). Pulled out the Tannus and tube together. The hole in the tube was vee shaped and about an 1/8" each side. So the 1/4' hole I mentioned that Stan's couldn't fix.. The only thing is it was on the rim side of the tube, away form the tire and the Tannus??? Since I don't have a spare tube in the Tannus undersize I patched it. Looked at the rim strip, nothing sharp there. It had moved around in places over the years but no exposed spoke nipples. I pulled it off no hidden objects??? A run to the bike shop fpr a new rim strip. it broke down like a normal tire. No drama getting it apart.
    It happened close to home because i rode about a mile and realized I wasn't wearing my helmet from working on the bike for a while. Almost made it home. The run flat option pretty much sucks.

    Comment


    • AZguy
      AZguy commented
      Editing a comment
      That sux! How on earth did you get something tearing your tube on the rim side? Is your rim tape messed up?

      I've had 1/8" hole and they literally sealed in less than a second but clearly if it's on the inside of the tube torus, pretty hard to seal...

    #19
    If I hadn't gone back for my helmet I would have been 2 miles away and not so amused by this. I used the tubes that Tannus offered with these. I wasn't impressed with them, but didn't wan't to say anything bad for no reason. But now they seemed paper thin, and the threading was not of the best quality either. I would say provide your own tubes. I ordered a couple more of these for bikes with 26x2 and 26x 1.75 tires. I'll try the next size down and see how it fits. Maybe my 26x 2.15 tire is really 1.9" on the inside. The insert with the smaller liners does say the liners may not match the size of your tires. So this is a known issue. Maybe the tube was too big? I'll play around with it some more tomorrow. For the 1.5- 1.9" size liner they use a 1.0-1.5" tube.

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      #20
      I had a couple Bontrager tubes split on one of those lines which I assume is some sort of seam. Same thing on the inside and my rims have fairly heavy tubeless rim strips with no signs of any issues. I was thinking they were a little on the thin side when I installed them plus I think advertised as 1.9-2.4 and I had 2.5 tires. I just figured they were maybe also stretched a little thin too. Shop where I bought them said that was all there was no such thing as a 29x2.5 tube and they often used 26x 2.0 tubes on 4" fat bikes.... I call BS on that. Was at a different shop and mentioned my tube issues and they pulled out a Bontranger branded tube that was a 2.5 and at least twice as thick, maybe even 3x. So far those have been great. I keep meaning to look and see what other sizes those HD tubes come in.

      Comment


      • Retrorockit
        Retrorockit commented
        Editing a comment
        I'll go looking for another tube. The size break on this one is 1.5 to 1.95 which is almost a full size tube for this tire. Some brands have a size break at 1.75 and a better tube. I also didn't talcum powder everything. I don't usually bother but for this project I'll do it. Definitely didn't expect a flat after 50 miles with all the protection possible and no sharp object involved. The only excuse I have for bothering to patch this tube is to keep all the Stan's form leaking out.
        Last edited by Retrorockit; 05-26-2022, 06:04 AM.

      #21
      I test fitted the next smaller Tannus in the 26x2.15 tire and it was definitely too small. So I'll work on the tube issue. I didn't like the looks of it to start with.
      I got some feedback on Stan's from the local Big Wheels bike shop. Not my favorite shop, but close by, and being the only shop in the west end of the county, very high volume.
      They don't sell Stan's any more. They offer a couple other products. They said they had 2 issues with Stan's. They say it clumps up when used with CO2. I guess it freezes next to the valve stem. The other issue was it damages the finish on bikes. I would assume this is full tubeless, and probably lightweight carbon bikes. The kid behind the counter said it was "abrasive", I think he meant corrosive.
      I could see both of these being less of an issue running it inside a tube. But a big problem with expensive tubeless tires on a high end bike.

      Comment


        #22
        Went to another LBS. Got a Kenda 26x1.75" tube. Just a good generic inner tube. This shop also stopped using Stan's. Both places are using Orangeseal now. I got some to try.
        Using talcum powder this time I put it all back together again. Tube in liner, liner and tube in tire, stem in the rim, first bead on rim. So far by the book. Seating the 2nd bead still needed some zip ties. But I think the liner took a set and I only needed a few this time. I don't want to let the air out to add sealer. So just a bare tube this time.
        Salvaged the Stan's out of the old tube and then tossed it. With the goo inside I didn't even cut it up for rubber bands. Time to ride again.

        Comment


        • AZguy
          AZguy commented
          Editing a comment
          The stans will rinse out easily with water

          On another board the tubeless guys seem to have moved from stans to the orange stuff... at my LBS the orange stuff is 50% more and the orange stuff recommends using about twice as much so in tubes I think with the track record I've got I'm sticking with the stans

          It sounds like with your initial tear it was more of an infant mortality oddity than something to worry about down the road

        • Retrorockit
          Retrorockit commented
          Editing a comment
          It made a triangular hole in a location where escaping air wouldn't carry sealant to it. It's back together and working now. Smooth, fast, and quiet. I just can't find Stan's around here anymore.I didn't put any in this time so it doesn't matter at the moment.

        #23
        Cleaned all the old tape glue, and rubber crumbs out of the rim, and installed fresh good old fashioned canvas rim tape.
        I think this may be a case of the Titanic Principal.(a variation of Murphy's law) Anything That Can't Go Wrong Will Go Wrong.
        Often provoked by hubris. Maybe running Stan's AND Tannus hoping to never patch a tube again was a step too far for the bicycle gods.
        I have a better (normal) inner tube, and better fit for my compensated undersize by selecting one myself.
        Took a ride last might, smooth Fast and quiet.
        A Lumina 1800 dual headlight arrived. I'll review it in " Deals, and Finds" thread because it was 30% off..

        Comment


          #24
          Like the idea of the Tannus liners. After several years without a flat, on our electrified tandem we had an explosive blowout in the rear, the longitudinal treads on a near-new top of the line Schwalbe MTB just blew apart like spaghetti. No sign of a puncture, sidewalls fine. There is easily 300# on the rear 26x2" tire with frame, tools, medical kit, riders. We also drilled out original aluminum rims (presta) for schrader despite cautions it could weaken the rim somewhat.

          With this heavy load wondering how using the foam could affect loading the aluminum rim? I know a wheel system wants to deform to flat oval at the point of pressure on a surface. How does that change if compressible foam is against the tyre face rather than the inner tube....

          Comment


          • Retrorockit
            Retrorockit commented
            Editing a comment
            You should probably go to the Schwalbe Pickup tire for the rear on that. It would match a Big Ben Plus up front.
            Since you aren't having a flat problem otherwise I would suggest Stan's, etc. in the tubes. Based on my experience as a truck mechanic the load carrying ability of a tire depends on the volume of air, and the pressure. The construction of the tire varies to a great degree to support higher pressures.
            So I would not use the Tannus for your application since it reduces the volume of air in the tire. Schwalbe provides a chart with load capacity and tire pressure for the Pickup tire. It comes in 26x2.15, or 26x2.35. It's EU certified for high speed E bikes, has special tread compound for high speed running, and can carry 150kG. @ 65PSI. which is what you NEED to be running.
            https://www.schwalbetires.com/blog/n...tures/pick-up/
            You can fix the occasional flat, an overload failure is a completely different matter.
            Last edited by Retrorockit; 05-27-2022, 06:17 AM.

          • Maxtandem
            Maxtandem commented
            Editing a comment
            thank you, Retrorocket. Using the Schwalbe Marathon Plus Tour, will investigate if the Pickup tire is hardier.
            --------------------
            After several years without a flat, on our electrified tandem we had an explosive blowout in the rear, the longitudinal treads on a near-new top of the line Schwalbe MTB just blew apart like spaghetti.

          #25
          I'm finding a sweet spot with this setup @ 17MPH. I'm going to try 40psi in the rear and see if it moves up to the 20mph range. What's going on, if I understand it correctly, is kind of technical. But related to ride tuning tricks of old American luxury cars of the 60's. So the SOP (Seat Of the Pants ) factor is relevant.

          Comment


            #26
            So I got in a 30 mile ride today. I'm liking the 5PSI f/r offset. So 35#F 40#R.
            What I'm playing with is suspension frequency. iI the rear is at a higher frequency than the front, at some speed the difference in front to rear response time to a bump will equal the time it takes to cover the distance of the wheelbase. The front to rear rocking motion will be canceled out and the ride will become vertical. This is what I think I was feeling at 17MPH. The HT @ 35PSI was just right. Going to 40 PSI raised the frequency of the rear so it synchronizes at a higher speed. It may have gone up to about 21-22mph. I'll Play around with 37-38PSI and see how it goes. But definitely rides good above 20MPH.. This is how the 1950-60 land yachts would cruise down the road at 70MPH with soft springs, and almost no shock,s floating up and down perfectly level. It of course works better with an actual suspension. But frequency is the reason 30-35 PSI tire pressure always feels so comfy. There's more going on here than just 5PSI tire pressure. There's a front suspension fork involved too so don't think a 5PSI offset is a magic number. 30-35PSI will always be soft, but control may be better at some other setting or some specific speed. I think the Tannus may have given me something to work with that I didn't have before. YMMV.

            Comment


            • Retrorockit
              Retrorockit commented
              Editing a comment
              I'm just going to put this in comments so I don't bump the thread. Somebody else
              is asking for help with their project.
              There is more going on with this mod than flat protection ( a very good thing in my case!) This has significantly improved the ride, handling, and high speed cruising of my 26" hardtail.
              Not only does it seem to add a small but useful amount of "suspension" travel, it also seems to be fairly well damped. This in itself is a big plus.
              It has definitely improved the ride, handling , and high speed capability of my 26" hardtail. In some ways a worst case configuration. Similar to going form a hardtail to a softtail bike. Now this is only as it applies to street riding small bump compliance. I'm not claiming it's much use for offroad XC riding. But maybe gravel trails it would apply.
              Regarding the increase in tire mass. It's real but probably no worse than going form 26x2.15" to say a 27.5 rim and 2.5" tire looking for the same results ,except soft surface flotation,the ability to run lower PSI offroad may even deliver some of that.
              It would be interesting to see if it helps with the undamped motions of a Fatbike tire at high speeds.Of course the weight penalty would be bigger also.
              Even though it was a PITA to install, and gave me a flat tire first try, I'm still a big fan of these things.

            • Retrorockit
              Retrorockit commented
              Editing a comment
              FWIW the first set of these I ordered directly form Tannus. The 2nd set from Eco Cycles, an established e bike vendor. I saved a few bucks, but didn't get the retail packaging, More of a bulk type experience, but the inner tubes were better from them also. The safe bet would be to get your own tubes from a trusted LBS. But the inner tube issue is a separate thing from the liners themselves.

            #27
            My small lot in town where I keep my crane was infested with goatheads when I first bought it, that was about 10 years ago. Since then I have managed to completely eliminate them, by a relentless regime of spraying 2-4D, Round Up, and walking the less than 1/4 acre site almost daily while the crane is warming up, looking for any survivors. You know how some people talk to their plants? Same with weeds, DIE MF'R!

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              #28
              The more I ride with the rear Tannus the more I like it. It's actually smoothed out the HT enough that I got serious about rattles on the full fendered and racked HT. Took the rattle out of the fenders, rack, folding lock, and CO2 bottles hidden inside the rack. Smooth silent and fast. It's even tight on the occasional off pavement excursion. I also find myself diving into bumpy turns I used to slow down for, and going faster around small traffic circles. On an HT or solid bike like a Redline or Cruiser I would definitely add these.

              Comment


                #29
                Have you been in any situations that tested the flat protection aspects again?

                Comment


                  #30
                  No flats so far. Having the bike off the road a while I got behind on cleaning broken glass off of the bike path. I got my wake up call today. Broken bottles, and 1" roofing nails sticking straight up. Big pieces of the bottles. Got back to cleaning it up. Big enough to take out a Tannus. All clear glass too. Would have been hard to see at night.

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