Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Mountain bike wheel/tyre upgrade

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Mountain bike wheel/tyre upgrade

    Hi,

    I'm looking for advice. I have a Carrera Crossfire 2 which I've had for a good 6-7 years. I love the bike and last year fitted an electric motor for longer distance rides. The battery is mounted on a rear pannier rack and I'd like to get a couple of bags to take a picnic and other items for long rides rather than wear a backpack.

    I have noticed since fitting the kit, with all the extra weight on the back wheel I can't get enough air in the rear tyre. I wondered if I could get a chunkier tyre (like those on a mountain bike) as it would be a high profile and might be able to take a bit more weight. My current tyre size is 700x42c‚Äč but I can't seem to find mountain bike tyres in this size.

    Do I need to change the whole bike, can I simply upgrade the wheels or should I just get a mountain bike frame and refit the kit?

    Any ideas much appreciated.

    Many thanks

    #2
    Have you looked at Schwalbe? Perhaps something like the Marathon Plus Touring? That comes in a 700x40. 120kg/265 pound weight rating. 3.5-60 bar 50-85 psi pressure range.

    Comment


      #3
      You should be able to mount the battery on the water bottle mounts on the down tube to free up some rack space.
      The things that affect tire load rating are tire volume, then tire pressure, then heavier construction to support more pressure. For smooth ride, and better braking at the higher weight and speed I would start with bigger tires.
      Schwalbe will almost certainly have a tire for you. The Marathon series is popular for loaded touring.
      While Schwalbe tires are generally excellent I would avoid the HS492 tread pattern used on some Marathon tires. The tire is basically not round with that particular tread pattern

      Comment


      • Retrorockit
        Retrorockit commented
        Editing a comment
        Also many of us here are using tubeless tire sealant inside of inner tubes to prevent flats. Since using this I've gone away from the heavier flat prevention type of tires to the softer lighter versions that didn't really prevent flats that well, especially small slow leaks that were hard to find all of them, or remove the sharp object from the tire.
        Last edited by Retrorockit; 02-16-2024, 06:47 AM.

      #4
      Some good points mentioned above. Anything which might help balance the load such as moving heavy batteries around, possibly a front mount storage for your picnic goodies, front fork mounted saddle bags?, etc will help.

      Specifically on ti[y]res - not sure about the UK, but on the 'merican side of the pond, "700x..." tires are generally 'road' tires and "29x..." are generally mountain bike / offroad tires, though they fit the same, on the same rim **(so long as rim width is considered and tire size is kept in check.) So a 700x42, we'd call that about a 29 x 1.65 (though you rarely see mountain bike tires that skinny labeled as such). Moving up, we might see the most skinny mountain bike tires labeled as 29x1.85 or 29x1.95 Which would be equivalent to about 700x50 or 700x52.

      So overall, you could consider 700 and 29 to be equivalent and convert the inch to metric with a 'multiply by 25.4', so 2.0 in is roughly 50mm.

      Given all that, it would still be good to match the tire to the intended purpose. Certainly a bigger tire will offer more area to spread the load, but if you are doing a lot of street riding with heavy loads, it would not be ideal to get a knobby 'mountain bike' tire which will likely have soft sidewalls to help wrap around rocks and grab uneven terrain. A soft 'offroad' compound may also wear out very fast under heavily loaded street riding.

      If you are looking at a tire which handles the higher loads with only an increase in pressure, beware that it may result in a harsher ride and possibly less traction at the extremes of grip. So a balance of a bigger tire, good load ratings and a design in-line with your general terrain (street, gravel path, full off road, etc) would be best.
      Last edited by K442; 02-16-2024, 11:56 AM.

      Comment


      • Retrorockit
        Retrorockit commented
        Editing a comment
        The Germans call 29ers 28" so best to stick with ERTO sizes 700x... when dealing with them.
        Also there is a new category of Gravel tires with tiny knobs compared to MTB but not smooth like street tires.
    Working...
    X