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Hopefully, the big wiring thread

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  • axmking
    commented on 's reply
    I don't know about all solder sleeves but the ones I've used have an indicator band on them that only changes once the solder has fully leeched into the strands

  • OptimusPrime
    commented on 's reply
    That's what she said.

  • funwithbikes
    replied
    +1. It is a matter of choosing the right tool for the job and practice. practice, practice :)

    Leave a comment:


  • paxtana
    commented on 's reply
    wow that thing is huge!

  • calfee20
    replied
    Generally speaking I get better results crimping than with soldering but I have spent considerable money to accomplish this. One of the biggest problems when soldering is poor preparation and the wrong sized soldering iron. A soldering operation should be relatively quick so the solder doesn't have time to wick up the wire strands and stiffen the area of the connection. I have multiple soldering irons, so maybe I should take a few more photos........calfee
    Last edited by calfee20; 03-24-2017, 07:12 AM.

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  • calfee20
    replied
    To crimp heaver wires into solid copper lugs and battery terminals you need something that resembles a bolt cutter.

    Click image for larger version

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    That huge crimper is really for battery terminals but it can also do those smaller lugs that are rated for 6 ga wire. The ratcheting crimper in the box can also do those lugs but that is about max for the tool.

    Here is a final photo of the hardware store inside my toolbox.

    Click image for larger version

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  • calfee20
    replied
    The first decent crimper that I got for the common insulated butt connectors and male & female spades that come in red blue and yellow is based on a vice grip style plier. I could never rely on a connection with these connectors until I got this tool.

    Click image for larger version

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    Note the three colored circles on the lower jaw to show the location of proper crimp. This tool was replaced with a more versatile tool with different jaws. I still use the older one most of the time though.

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  • calfee20
    replied
    The electrical tools I have used as a mechanic and motorcycle enthusiast. I have picked up a few special tools to make my work easier over the years. My first dealer level job was with VW, Porsche, and Audi. This was a real training ground because they had horrid electrical systems back in the 70's.

    The first kit I bought was a VW item that would service any European car with Bosch components. It also worked somewhat on American and Japanese products. I totally refabricated a 75 Norton wiring harness with this kit to remove any trace of Lucas "The Prince of Darkness" from my bike. I have had many years of trouble free service from this electrical system and that is not a common thing for 70's English products

    .Click image for larger version

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    This crimper made a double crimp. One on the bare wire and the other on the insulation to provide strain relief. Note the two common connectors and the VW part number.

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    Here is the whole kit.

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  • calfee20
    commented on 's reply
    I agree with you but in my case once I did the research I realized upgrading the factory battery wires wasn't worth the effort.

  • Canuman
    replied
    Originally posted by calfee20 View Post
    When I put my bike together the BBHSD from Luna had nice beefy 10 ga wires but the slimline battery leads were a skinny 14 ga. This worried me even though I kept telling myself the battery people must know what they are doing. I found this calculator online that eased my fears. http://www.electriciancalculators.co...cond_size.html

    Evidentially DC is considered the same as single phase AC. So enter 48 volts dc or if you want to increase your margin of safety enter 120 volts 1 phase. I used a max of 30 amps and a 3% voltage drop. The only wires I was worried about were the battery leads that were less that 2 feet in total length so I entered that and hit calculate. As you can see for short lengths of wire surprisingly small gauge wires can be used.

    It took me a while to find this calculator again so I am putting it in my favorites. Another thing you should remember is that electricity flows down the surface of the wire and it only flows through the wire when the amps get toward capacity. This is why finely stranded wire will carry more current than stranded wire. My battery wires were very finely stranded. While playing with the calculator you can see that even 120 volts, 30 amps, and 10 feet of wire was still OK with a 14 ga wire.
    Thanks for that. Useful stuff!

    I think Luna is one of a handful in the industry that is attempting to push the standards on this. While smaller gauge wires may do in theory, when they get cruddy, the efficiency drops way down. A friend does solar install, and he always goes up one or two sizes for recommended gauge. The thing is, under average conditions, a 14 gauge wire may do the trick. Cover the stuff with oxide and you're turning valuable battery energy into heat. It really doesn't cost that much more to make things bombproof. As funwithbikes said, a lot of the engineering is done on a home lawnmower scale --- while better engineering costs more than the average user wants to spend. As a DIY builder, you can build to any standard you want.
    Last edited by Canuman; 03-18-2017, 05:32 PM.

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  • Gr8fun
    replied
    For really good connections get submersble pump connectors, wire. home depot etc. Heavy duty crimps and silicone filled heat shrink. Very water proof. Made to last years with constant use under water.

    Leave a comment:


  • calfee20
    replied
    When I put my bike together the BBHSD from Luna had nice beefy 10 ga wires but the slimline battery leads were a skinny 14 ga. This worried me even though I kept telling myself the battery people must know what they are doing. I found this calculator online that eased my fears. http://www.electriciancalculators.co...cond_size.html

    Evidentially DC is considered the same as single phase AC. So enter 48 volts dc or if you want to increase your margin of safety enter 120 volts 1 phase. I used a max of 30 amps and a 3% voltage drop. The only wires I was worried about were the battery leads that were less that 2 feet in total length so I entered that and hit calculate. As you can see for short lengths of wire surprisingly small gauge wires can be used.

    It took me a while to find this calculator again so I am putting it in my favorites. Another thing you should remember is that electricity flows down the surface of the wire and it only flows through the wire when the amps get toward capacity. This is why finely stranded wire will carry more current than stranded wire. My battery wires were very finely stranded. While playing with the calculator you can see that even 120 volts, 30 amps, and 10 feet of wire was still OK with a 14 ga wire.

    Leave a comment:


  • Nick R.
    commented on 's reply
    WOW what a great post, as a newbie I now feel confident that I can make at least a reasonable joint. My next question is going with large wire (12g) for all connections ok or am I heading for trouble. Nick R.

  • calfee20
    commented on 's reply
    I didn't even know the solder crimpless butt connectors even existed. I think there will be a fine line between burning through the shrink wrap and getting the soldered connection right.

  • funwithbikes
    replied
    If they work they look like they could be a solution to a hard problem for a lot of new builders.

    My concern would be that the torch heats the solder rather than the wire. The problem with most inexperienced people is that they heat a blob of solder on their iron and then dab it on the connection. This results in a cold joint. It is neither mechanically nor electrically solid or reliable.

    Even something as simple as instructing the builder to hold the connection in hot part of the flame for x number of second after the solder melts might solve that concern.

    Before recommending these, I would suggest that someone make up bunch and then use a Dremel tool with a circular cutter to cut them open to make sure then the solder has wetted completely to all (or at least) most of the individual wire strands.

    Leave a comment:

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