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The 'Orange Monster' runs! (kind of)

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    The 'Orange Monster' runs! (kind of)

    So I finally got all the components hooked up on my "Kyoto Cruiser" a plans built, DIY, side-by-side tandem trike. The Luna Cycle 48-volt battery is rated at 16.5 amp hours, the 800 watt brushless - gear reduction motor supposedly good for about 470 rpm, and the controller meant to make everything work.
    But I might have "screwed the pooch". Any input greatly appreciated.... When the battery arrived I put it on the charger and brought it up to 54 volts and then mounted it on the bike frame. Ran the hot and ground leads back to the controller to begin the wiring process. Made sure the battery was turned "off" at the switch on the side of the battery and checked the voltage with a meter. The meter read '24 volts'. WTF? I turned the battery 'on' and it read '54 volts', I turned it 'off' and it read '24 volts' again. Oh well, I left it off, but still hooked up to the battery cradle and wired the ground lead to the controller. Then I grabbed the battery 'hot' lead and when I touched that to the controller 'hot' lead a BIG FRICKIN' SPARK. Oops. Did I do something wrong? I went about wiring the rest of the controller; three heavy leads from the controller to the three corresponding leads from the motor, multi-pin from the controller to the multi-pin from the motor, throttle multi-pin to the controller, etc.
    Sat my big butt on the seat, twisted the throttle, and viola...it was off to the races - really slow races as it turns out. On level ground the motor would only push the trike at about 6-7 mph??? So I read the wiring instructions again and had apparently mis-read the section that said connecting the two white leads from the controller would reduce the power output from the motor and disconnecting them would increase the power. I had them connected and figured that disconnecting them would make a huge difference. Nada. Same crappy 6-7mph.
    Now the gear ratios on the motor/axle sprockets (14/18 teeth) and the 20" tire should give me about 20mph at 470 rpm but I'm only getting 6-7.
    So when I saw that big spark when I wired up the controller did I fry something? And what is the proper way to wire the new controller up (if it comes to that)? Any help is appreciated!!!!!






    #2
    Oh, and one other thing...
    When I initially wired up the motor, it was spinning counter-clockwise. Because of its orientation on the frame it needed to spin clockwise so I connected the two 'reverse switch' leads from the controller to get it to run in the proper direction. Also the 'cheapo' twist throttle only starts the motor turning after about a quarter to a half turn of the throttle. Is that the proper way to get an electric motor to turn in the opposite direction or should the leads from the controller to the motor be reversed? And is that why the throttle acting wonky or is that amount of 'slop' in throttle actuation normal in electric motors?
    Anybody?

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      #3
      Answered part of my own question... In wiring the 'reverse switch' leads together I effectively spun the motor in the proper direction but the controller default for power output in 'reverse' is only about half of what it is for the motor in 'forward. Which makes sense as this motor is meant for a golf cart application and you obviously don't want the driver to hit the throttle in reverse in a golf cars and have full power available.
      So disconnecting the reverse switch leads and now the motor spins the wrong way for my needs but depending on if the 'low' speed or 'high' speed connection is made at the two white leads I have low and high speeds coming out of the motor.
      So the next question is... how do I get an electric motor to spin in reverse of what the 'default' is for the controller? Three heavy cables coming from the controller to the motor: yellow, green, and blue? Do two of them need to be reversed?

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        #4
        I've read many comments on the ebike forums about the twist throttles. Some say they work great - others say they work more like a "ON-OFF" switch. I have 2 bikes fitted with the Bafang left-hand twist throttle. One of them exhibits a smooth gradual increase of power through the full twist movement, from barely moving to 100% power. The other one does nothing for about a quarter turn (just like yours) and then seems to go from 0-100% power in the next few degrees of movement. They both look exactly the same, and "feel" the same when I twist them, so I don't know what accounts for the difference in performance. Controller programming?

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          #5
          Yeah, my guess it's a cheapo throttle, which I can live with... if I can figure out how to spin the motor in the opposite direction of what it comes from the factory programmed to spin. Not a lot on the internet on this but closing the 'reverse switch' leads is definitely not the way to do as that limits speed of the motor by about 50%.

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            #6
            Does it have the 2 white self learning wires? each time you plug them in it reverses direction (the ones i've used anyway)

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              #7
              So in my first research on this topic on the internet apparently I wanna swap the connection on any two of the three wires running from the controller to the motor, i.e., the yellow, blue, or green wires. But hwat about the three associated small wires running from the hall sensor back to the controller? Do I also swap out the corresponding yellow, blue, or green wires with the same swap as the big wires?
              Any thoughts?

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                #8
                If I has the self learning white wires than swapping the green and blue won't work

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                  #9
                  While it does have two white wires, I don't think they're self-learning. According to the controller diagram their purpose is to allow for slow or high speed operation depending on if they're connected or not connected. What I have found is that when the motor is operating in 'reverse' as might be needed on a golf cart (intended application?) the default speed is 'slow' and the white wire connection doesn't affect that. Only when the motor is operating in 'forward' configuration does the connection of the white wires matter. So I need to operate the motor reversed when it's configured to run 'forward'. So I'll try swapping out two of the three 'phase' cables and the two color corresponding 'hall' wires and see where that gets me. My only other option is turning the motor on the frame, welding in new motor mounts, and re-positioning the drive sprockets to the outboard side of the left axle. Here's a close-up of the current configuration prior to me wiring it all up.

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                    #10

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                      #11
                      Good work . Very clean build

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                        #12
                        Thanks dude, I'll try the wiring suggestion as outlined in that diagram first thing tomorrow and see where that gets me.

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                          #13
                          Ebike1

                          This flow chart is epic. Everybody should have a copy of this file. Where did you get it?

                          Here is a short animated video of the Hall effect: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:H...nsor.webm#file
                          Last edited by commuter ebikes; 04-27-2017, 01:19 AM.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by commuter ebikes View Post
                            Ebike1

                            This flow chart is epic. Everybody should have a copy of this file. Where did you get it?

                            Here is a short animated video of the Hall effect: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:H...nsor.webm#file
                            I used it when I was mating Lyen controllers to Crystalyte, MXUS and other brand hub motors. I found it 3 years ago. Now I use Sunwin , Kelly and Yuyangking controllers. All 3 use matching phase and halls wires on QS motors. I'm a QS motors guy. Here is a better resolution image link https://postimg.org/image/8opsz3qjd/

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                              #15
                              WHOA! Changed out two of the phase wires (yellow-green) and two of the hall sensor wires (green-blue) and that did the trick! After having put maybe two miles on the trike previously in our hilly neighborhood and struggling along at 6-8 mph on motor power alone, the trike now easily does 18-20mph (maybe just a little bit more) on level surfaces and cruises up moderately steep hills at 10-15mph. It's all I could have hoped for. Be interested to see what kind of range it has with Luna's Jumbo Shark 16.5 ah 48-volt battery. Need to get the speedo finely calibrated and wait for dry, sunny, and warmer weather. I'm stoked!

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