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Help me upgrade my Ancheer electric bike

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  • Retrorockit
    replied
    I would look for a date code on that battery. It could be almost as old as the first one. I have no specific knowledge of Ancheer doing this, but I would look at that. Especially if they haven't sold that model for a while. If you go to an automotive electrical shop they can show you what a battery date code looks like.

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  • JoelOl75
    replied
    Be aware that any Ancheer Ebike with the 36v "Water bottle shaped" battery (Model # AM001907) has been recalled!!! See https://www.cpsc.gov/Recalls/2023/E-...ted-by-Ancheer
    You can recieve a new battery through Ancheer's website: https://www.ancheer.shop/recalls/
    Last edited by JoelOl75; 08-30-2023, 04:24 PM.

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  • Goofpod
    replied
    Older post but still relevant to me. Please don't advise me to cut the losses and sell the Ancheer. I don't want to. I've had it almost 4 years and it's held up well overall (solid and reliable). I cannot readily afford a $2-3k bike and the wife would kill me. Plus, I've already invested some additional $$ in replacement parts and I'm Ok with that because the bike is still solid. It's one of several bikes I have but the only e-bike in my garage.

    So... this Ancheer bike worked GREAT for two years and then started cutting out entirely, especially on hills. I read that it's the battery so I ordered a new battery directly from Ancheer. That solved the cutting out problem but then I noticed a reduction in power at higher speeds while using pedal assist. (I'm not sure about throttle-only because I rarely use that feature.) I used to be able to fly along at 20-25 mph while pedaling in the highest gear but that changed to me now having to provide much more effort, the bike lagging along. The lower range doesn't seem to be affected, only the higher range. Knowing I was going to keep the bike I ordered a new controller, again directly from Ancheer, but that didn't help. Luckily, I found a brand new rear wheel with motor cheap on EBay so I got that and still no improvement. Lastly, I replaced the cadence sensor on the crankshaft (generic sensor off EBay) and still no luck. So, I have a few spare parts on hand but that's OK. :)

    I'm wondering now if I got a bad battery from Ancheer. I can't think of anything else to swap out. I'd think the motor would perform well, dictated only by the amount of power being delivered (based on its draw) from the battery so I can rule out the motor. A brand new controller rules out that unit. The power assist sensor is also new, but generic. Battery?

    I found this YouTube post about disabling the speed limiter, going to try that just in desperation for immediate help: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eNknHHA5Yfc

    Question: Can I swap in a 48V battery since the controller is rated 36/48V and I'll not need a new LCD and also not adversely affect the motor? TIA

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  • Goofpod
    commented on 's reply
    I have the 26" folding model, AM004142 with the magnesium alloy 6-spoke wheels (I'll never buy those again- talk about wind resistance!). I've seen the unmatched, open connectors on the controller, but my throttle works. That may not be your issue. I'll check mine again and let you know which ones were left open by the factory. I've had my bike for almost four years and it's held up well overall, with some replacements. Albeit heavy, it performs well for the low cost.

  • jGecko
    replied
    Originally posted by Howard March View Post
    ...One is a single pin white wire and the other a two pin red and black wire connector. There is a matching white wire open connector, but no matching open connector for the red and black one. I connected the white wires and the Throttle worked for awhile....
    The information here is to tell you what the white wire connectors and the black/red wire connector you decribed actually do, and more importantly, WHY they almost certainly don't have anything to do with your issue...unless there is NO brake sensor connection at all...which is unlikely. (see my discussion below about OR-ing of brake sensor wires).
    For more information on diagnosing throttle related problems, I suggest checking out URL

    Simplistic and not too deep:
    https://electricscooterparts.com/thr...tingguide.html
    Very Through:
    https://electricbike.com/forum/forum...tion#post70588
    ====================================

    Single White Wire (x2)
    In general on Ancheer ebikes, the single white wires are enable/disable maximum speed inhibitor. When the white wires are disconnected, the bike's maximum throttle speed is LIMITED to about 15mph. When they are connected together, the limit is removed and the throttle, when working properly, can take the bike to its maximum possible speed (per controller, programming, voltage, etc). In some cities/states/countries, the white wires are disconnected by the manufacturer to LIMIT the top speed to keep the bike's top speed to legal mph/kph to still be legally classed as an ebike instead of a scooter/motorcycle which would require licensing, insurance, driver's licensing, etc.

    I can't see how simply connecting the wire could "fix" the throttle...unless you simply jostled some wires/connections inside the controller or in the throttle assembly cable while you were working on the wiring, harness, etc and simply jostled a bad connection and temporarily made the throttle work. I would first check for loose connections in cable and controller, and possible "shorts" in the controller and where wires rub together
    WARNING:: the following check can be extremely dangerous.
    Then following the cables from one end to another, jostle the cables a bit while holding the throttl switch at abouit 1/4 "power". Be CERTAIN the powered wheel isn't touching the ground or could get entangled in anything while doing this. It can be dangerous. Pretty much standard debug. Anything more is technical electrial/mechanical debugging beyond the sope of a couple mintes.
    See forum entries like

    Black/Red Wire Connector (probably not used/needed on your model):
    Note: from my experience with Ancheer ebike controllers, the black with red stripe wire connector is PROBABLY a redundant brake connector in this bike's current configuration. This is not guaranteed...just based on observation. A different model or later manufactured ebike could change that at any given time.

    Here's why it's likely not needed/used in your case. Overall...as long as the motor shuts down when EITHER brake is activated, an "empty" second Black/Red wire connector is redundant, doesn't have a function on your particular model of ebike, and may be ignored.
    Ebikes usually electrically "OR" the left and right brake sensors so that when either brake lever is activated, the controller gets the signal to shut off the motor. Thie "OR"ing can be done outside the controller, or inside it. Outside the controller, the electrical OR-ing connection is usually done up at the handlebar so that only 1 cable has to go to the controllers black/red cable connector. However, the controller manufacturers also allow the bike manufacturers to use separate brake signal wires, one from the left brake and one from the right brake to each run separately from the handlebar with each of those 2 wires running into the controller box, and each wire connects to its own unique black/red brake sensor connector. It offers some flexibiliity to the bike manufacturer in putting the bike braking subsystem together. With 2 wire assemblies, the OR-ing can be hardwired on the controller's printed circuit board or in bike software/firmware while keeping the connections totally separate. It generally doesn't make any difference in how the braking works. Using 2 separate connectors for Left and Right brakes also allows users to use different kinds of brake lever designs which may be electrically incompatible with being hardwire OR-ed.
    Last edited by jGecko; 04-15-2022, 06:57 AM.

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  • Howard March
    replied
    I am a newbee to ancheer and ebikes. fairly mechanical, but not electrically good. I just got an Ancheer 26" folding ebike and assembled it fairly easily. Throttle was installed, but not connected. I opened controller box and saw two open connectors. One is a single pin white wire and the other a two pin red and black wire connector. There is a matching white wire open connector, but no matching open connector for the red and black one. I connected the white wires and the Throttle worked for awhile. I left the red and black connector alone since there wasn't a matching open connector for it. When I put the controller back together the throttle stopped working. What am I doing wrong?

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  • donnyneff72@gmail.com
    replied
    Is there a higher speed controller for my ancheer sport electric mountain bike that will match

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  • Wheelbender6
    replied
    By the way, has the Ancheer been reliable? They now offer 36v 500w bikes at a bargain price. That should provide more satisfactory performance for new buyers.
    Last edited by Wheelbender6; 10-25-2020, 01:16 PM.

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  • jGecko
    replied
    The QR code on the controller in the Ancheer AM-001908 ebike specs it at:
    Model: X813-AA26E-12Z
    Voltage: 36V-48V
    Current: 15A

    So it is spec'd to handle 48VDC, however the 15A spec may impose performance limits. But that current limit is based mostly on the MOSFETS used...not capacitors. If performance is limited while keeping the same controller, then alternatives would be to double-up the MOSFETS, increase the cooling for the MOSFETS, and/or change the MOSFETS to ones with higher current/wattage handling values (but may remain limited due to limited cooling in the small controller and enclosed controller compartment (no ventilation for added cooling)).

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  • Mikkel3012
    replied
    What do you guys Know About the different products?hub and battery and controller. I have 350w hub and 48v 10.2 ah battery samsung. Need to go faster. It stops around 30km/t
    New hub and controller?
    in new in this. Seeking Some guidence.

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  • HarryS
    replied
    I'm always cutting those wires so I can have the 9 pin modular plug on a hub motor if it didn't come with one. Yes, it does take a while, I use crimp connectors on the three heavy wires. I think they're better for strain relief.

    If the original battery has the minimum current needed by the controller (and an Ancheer doesn't need much), more AH only extends range. More volts gives you speed.

    You should always look inside the controller. Take off the end cap. In some cases the case has a separate top that comes off, which makes it easier to inspect. If it only uses 50V caps, consider adding a separate 2S module. That would put you at 50,4V max, which probably is OK. You can practice your build skills on that module. I made a 3S module which I sometimes add in series to my 36V batteries. I bought a 12,6V charger.






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  • moarpower
    commented on 's reply
    I mean this in the most polite possible way: stop polishing that turd and build a real bike. Sell the Ancheer, eat the loss, and chalk it up to learning experience.

    Build your own bike and spec the components based off what you did and didn’t like about the Ancheer. Don’t waste any more money. Start saving for something better instead. (I have used these exact bikes as examples of what NOT to buy on this forum several times.)

    48V controllers use 63V capacitors. 48V batteries fully charge to 54.6V and 52V batteries fully charge to 58.8V. If you’re too lazy to check the capacitors then you are not the right person to be doing a battery upgrade. Keep researching and saving up for something better.
    Last edited by moarpower; 04-17-2018, 07:19 AM.

  • BikeMike509
    replied
    There are 8 wires, 3 large and 5 small, I cut the cord to put a quick disconnect, whole lot of soldering and had at add an inch to the 5 small wires, took about 3 hours to do it right, I had to rig the bike from the hoist in my shop which took some time so I could work on it from a comfy position. don't cut that wire unless you have lots of time on your hands

    I also want to make some power upgrades, I went from 8.5ah to the 11.5ah don't feel much difference I put about 10miles a week and never use the 11.5ah batt. I think leaving the charger on for days weakens the battery, so I do my best to unplug when charged.I f'd up and ground out the rear tire brackets to put on some Kenda KOT 2.35s which are gnarly but rubbed from wideness, took off a bit too much w the die grinder and every now and then it pulls itself off one side, looking in to retighten fill the holes, have every welder but a tig and wondering if jbweld or a HC epoxy will stick. I want to fix the gear so my cadence lowers at 18mph so it's more like a road bike or downhill bike. Going to need a larger front ring I'm pretty sure. Has anyone dropped a 48v waterbottle type into the Ancheer e-bike with the 37v controller, I dont have time to open the controller to look at the Capacitors to see if they have some 48-50v in there, I have the skill to add more 18650's to upgrade my 11.5 to a 48v I'm pretty sure, It might need a new balance board and of course charger but were talking 75$ for charger high-end batteries and an hours work to make a 4-500$ battery(upgrading the 36v I never use. If there is any experience or knowledge anyone has to share please do so. Thanks for reading.

    My goals would be 25mph and to pedal it even faster.

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  • HarryS
    replied
    I swapped in a 48V battery into my 36V kit bike. Wow, I forgot how much this boosts performance. Top speed went from about 18 to over 24 mph. I was happy with the original performance so I'll stay with 36V, but maybe this could work for you. If you keep it under 18 mph, and add some pedal assist (it will be a lot easier), maybe you can get some decent range with a 10-12 AH battery.

    If your controller can take 48V, you can get away with a battery change. On the other hand a 20A controller isn't expensive if you just get a simple one without an LCD. Requires some electrical competence to install.

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  • HarryS
    replied
    A 36V motor will run about 18 mph with a 26" wheel. Sounds like your performance numbers are based on throttle only, as you're describing a range of about 8 miles if you only get 35-40 minutes of riding. I don't run throttle only on my bikes. It takes too much power.

    You can indeed get more range with a larger AH battery. The range will be proportional to the AH rating. Even then, you will only get 16 miles with a 16AH battery and those are not going to be $200. More like $500-600.

    To get more speed, you will have to upgrade to a 48V battery and a 48V controller.

    Maybe you're expecting too much. That particular ebike and everything else in its class was intended to go about 14 mph with pedal assist and probably go 14-20 miles depending on how much pedaling you do,.

    .
    Last edited by HarryS; 08-27-2017, 10:33 PM.

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