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Moved my battery

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    Moved my battery

    Oringinally I had my Luna Shark mounted to the rear rack because my bottle cage mounts were too close to the bottom bracket to fit the battery mount. Luna recently got extra mounts in stock so I figured I'd get one and experiment. Taking the mount apart I found that the metal section has just the 2 battery wires running through it so I drilled two holes to fit the bottle cage bolt holes and it fit like a charm. I figured I needed another mount point though because with the two bolts at the extreme end of the battery it didn't seem balanced. I found an interesting item in my local HomeDepot called a well nut. It's a nut inside a rubber shell that you insert into a blind hole and then it expands to tighten itself much like a riv nut except that you don't need any special tools. So I drilled a hole in my down tube and used one of these as an anchor.

    I must say that the handling of the bike has changed very noticeably for the better! And it looks way better also. Here is a before and after picture...

    #2
    Nice experiment and result, thanks for showing us.
    Fabrication is fun! Build something today. Show someone. Let them help. Inspire and share. Spread the desire.

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      #3
      I noticed there is space between the battery and frame near the top. My set-up was similar and the plastic mount was too flimsy to handle the battery's weight even with the lock. My battery broke off within the first 50 miles, while riding 30+ mph on a busy street. Fortunately the battery surfed along the road rather than going end over end. The heat friction melted the plastic clips, but the battery survived intact and continues to perform well. My bike is no-suspension though so every bump sends shivers everywhere at high speed. You may not have the same issue.

      Anyway it turned out to be a simple fix. I filled the gap with a few felt guards (those round things you stick on the bottom of chair legs to protect wood floors) and wrapped a velcro strap tight around the battery and frame. It's very stable now and I've had no issues after 600+ miles.
      Last edited by CraigAustin; 06-06-2016, 12:52 AM.

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        #4
        Really nice.... yes much better balance with not having all the weight in the rear.

        I was hoping getting extra mounting brackets in stock and offered at an affordable price would get people willing to do this kind of experiment. So glad to see it work in real life :)

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          #5
          I've used those well nuts for 20 years when mounting solar panels on a RV's roof. The ones I use have a 1/4" coarse thread brass nut embedded in the EPDM, and they require a 7/16" hole to be drilled in the mounting surface . I have never had one come loose or fail, they seem to be super reliable. They also provide a water tight seal, and provide a little cush against vibration. I t never occurred to me to use them on the bike, good idea OP!

          Comment


            #6
            Also, when you lower the CG, you dont have to lean as much when turning. My first bike looked like yours, and i was always hitting my pedals on the ground when leaning to turn.

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              #7
              Originally posted by CraigAustin View Post
              I noticed there is space between the battery and frame near the top. My set-up was similar and the plastic mount was too flimsy to handle the battery's weight even with the lock. My battery broke off within the first 50 miles, while riding 30+ mph on a busy street. Fortunately the battery surfed along the road rather than going end over end. The heat friction melted the plastic clips, but the battery survived intact and continues to perform well. My bike is no-suspension though so every bump sends shivers everywhere at high speed. You may not have the same issue.

              Anyway it turned out to be a simple fix. I filled the gap with a few felt guards (those round things you stick on the bottom of chair legs to protect wood floors) and wrapped a velcro strap tight around the battery and frame. It's very stable now and I've had no issues after 600+ miles.
              That's really funny you mention that. After I took that picture I saw that space too and stuck some epoxy putty in there to form a support under the bracket much like your use of the felt guards! The whole mount is rock solid now.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by CPG View Post
                I've used those well nuts for 20 years when mounting solar panels on a RV's roof. The ones I use have a 1/4" coarse thread brass nut embedded in the EPDM, and they require a 7/16" hole to be drilled in the mounting surface . I have never had one come loose or fail, they seem to be super reliable. They also provide a water tight seal, and provide a little cush against vibration. I t never occurred to me to use them on the bike, good idea OP!
                I'm glad to hear you have had good luck with the well nuts, that gives me confidence in my application! I used a 10-32 size nut which I think is the same as a typical water bottle cage mount bolt.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Hello folks, i used 1/4 20 riv nuts as well, but i removed the bottle nuts from bike and replaced while adding a third nut for a very strong fit. Also , i'm running another batt in par for added range. Nope don't have a clue yet for range/time.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by OptimusPrime View Post
                    Oringinally I had my Luna Shark mounted to the rear rack because my bottle cage mounts were too close to the bottom bracket to fit the battery mount. Luna recently got extra mounts in stock so I figured I'd get one and experiment. Taking the mount apart I found that the metal section has just the 2 battery wires running through it so I drilled two holes to fit the bottle cage bolt holes and it fit like a charm. I figured I needed another mount point though because with the two bolts at the extreme end of the battery it didn't seem balanced. I found an interesting item in my local HomeDepot called a well nut. It's a nut inside a rubber shell that you insert into a blind hole and then it expands to tighten itself much like a riv nut except that you don't need any special tools. So I drilled a hole in my down tube and used one of these as an anchor.

                    I must say that the handling of the bike has changed very noticeably for the better! And it looks way better also. Here is a before and after picture...
                    Is this the newest Trek? Model name?

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by Louis Luna View Post

                      Is this the newest Trek? Model name?
                      It's a Trek Shift, It is a current model but I think they have been making them for 3 years

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Yeah, thought so. It displaced the Pure. My favored crank forward Trek. Still a nice bike and a great BBSHD candidate. What size is the BB, please?

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Louis Luna View Post
                          Yeah, thought so. It displaced the Pure. My favored crank forward Trek. Still a nice bike and a great BBSHD candidate. What size is the BB, please?
                          Bottom bracket is 73mm. I changed out the handlebar for a more cruiser-like one and have an Electra seat on order along with a Suntour NCX seat post. Should be very comfy.

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