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derailuer

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    derailuer

    Hey guys , I have a 21 speed trek bike I am converting to an e-bike but the front derailer seems to be in the way when I shift to a lower gear. Can I adjust derailer to make it work? or should I just take it off ? and if i take off am i right in saying ill lose some gears ?

    #2
    If going with a mid-drive it's most likely impractical to implement a derailleur system up front

    Most just remove them - some will make them fixed to act as a chain guide

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      #3
      You shouldn't need your smaller chain ring, or front derailleur with an electric assist kit.
      "I need another SimuLatte"

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        #4
        Originally posted by Wheelbender6 View Post
        You shouldn't need your smaller chain ring, or front derailleur with an electric assist kit.
        That's arguable depending on the rider, the bike and their use cases

        I've yet to see a mid-drive with a front derailleur but there's gotta be something out there... the only practical system with more than one ring up front I've seen is guys that have it setup to move by hand from one ring to the other... I think these days with a 10+sp system you can get enough range in the cassette to make the front moot

        My experience with large tires is I need a lowest gear cassette cog to be 10% larger than my chain ring - I could easily see more but that for me is a sweet spot

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          #5
          Alright thanks for replies. How about a chain cover is that necessary ?

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            #6
            It usual to run a single front cog and get, or make a wide ratio casette. For older bikes with 7-9 speed setups there are derailer hanger extensions to allow the larger rear cogs.
            This is how the 1x10, and 1x11 speed bikes do without a front derailer. Getting the chainline in the same position as the original middle chainring is the hard part.
            Many of your 21 gears are duplicates of each other, and many aren't useful due to being severely cross chained. The electric motor is less particular about the spacing between gear ratios.

            A 21 speed Trek will either be very old, or a low end model. The 7 speeds hubs were mostly freewheel gear clusters, with the one way clutch inside the casette. They are often limited to a 13T top gear.
            The 8 speed and up are freehub. The clutch is in the axle and they can run an 11t top gear. Also the choice of casettes, and the ability to stack one for yourself is much better. It might be worth upgrading to 8-9 speed.

            The Sheldon Brown Gear calculator has drop down menus with almost all of the cassetes available. Enter your tire size, chain ring and select speed at 90rpm for gear units.

            This should give you some idea whether 1x7 will work for you or not.

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              #7
              Originally posted by bobbd View Post
              Alright thanks for replies. How about a chain cover is that necessary ?
              On the rear-hub bike I loan out a lot I fashioned up some guards for the chain ring - mostly because it dropped the chain a lot but it also prevents unsuspecting riders from the old pant leg in the ring thing

              On my BBSHD bike when wearing long pants I just put on a pant leg clip like I did from nearly day one of riding as a child and run the chain and ring naked

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                #8
                Thx all for all the replies and happy riding.

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