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Avoiding flat tires: slime, tire liners & more tire liners.

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    Avoiding flat tires: slime, tire liners & more tire liners.

    I must get more flat tires than anybody. Most people in my position would have gone back to commuting in a car. 99% of my driving is in the paved bike lane. There is 355 lbs on my rear tire and I cruise about 35 mph. Apparently this is the best way to puncture tubes!

    Here is what I have learned:

    (1) Definitely scan the path ahead of you for puncture hazards and be prepared to swerve around them. For night riding, get all the light you can, slow down and scan for puncture hazards.
    (2) If you can, buy thick tires like Schwalbe or moped tires.
    (3) Slime helps sometimes, but it will often fail to seal even small holes. When putting slime in a tube, use a tube with a removable valve core and buy a valve core removal tool.
    (4) My experimental homemade seven layer Kevlar tire liner did not work out. Kevlar tape needs epoxy in order to work properly.
    (5) NoMor flats and similar solid foam tubes do not work, except on kids' bikes.
    (6) Using old, bald tires with the beads trimmed and the knobbies ground down (with a huge die grinder) is the closest thing to the Holy Grail of flat prevention. It will require a fair amount of extra power to get that extra mass rolling, but once rolling you have more momentum. One extra tire isn't enough? Put in another one. You have to cut out a little bit of the circumference in order for it to fit.
    (7) Mr. Tuffy liners are just okay. They should make them more tough.
    (8) I have tried using several old tubes slit down the inner seam to be used as additional tire liners. It worked okay, but not as well as old tires.

    Questions for you guys:
    (1) I have been using the green tire slime and I am not too impressed. Is there a better brand out there?
    (2) What experience do you have with running high or low tire pressures to avoid punctures?
    (3) Any other ideas about a tough tire liner? Should I be looking at an expandable metal hoop?
    (4) Would it be a good idea to spray Line-X (used to coat truck beds) on a tire liner?
    (5) Any other ideas? All these flat tires are really raining on my parade. I am willing to try the weird, experimental ideas. I work at UPS and we have these "forever bags" for small packages. The material might me a good candidate for a tire liner. Maybe a strip of leather or rubber would be good.
    Last edited by commuter ebikes; 07-21-2016, 01:04 AM.

    #2
    I have Stans no more flat rims with Stans no more flat sealant. It will seal small holes. I purchased this bike second hand and haven't done a lot of mileage on it yet. Maybe someone else has used the Stans no more flat system with high mileage that can comment. But so far I'm impressed. We have this double Gee thistle here in Australia and after pulling out 3 each hole sealed. This sealant goes hard as it seals the hole.

    Comment


      #3
      Look on the mountain bike forums. I saw a test where all the available tubeless products were tested on punctures. I think Orange Seal did the best, but now Stan's has a product specifically for punctures that was not tested. I use Orange seal for tubeless and it dries out completely in less than 6 months and you have to stick in more. If you come across any additional tests, please post it.

      Comment


        #4
        With that kind of weight and speed you probably need to look into a motorcycle tire for that bike.

        Comment


          #5
          Long ago in the days of super powers i used rawhide strips to help from getting curb / pot hole pinches and found that all but the worst punctures were stopped short. Draw back would be similar to using old tire. These days now that super powers are all used up, i don't worry about it much.

          Comment


            #6
            Schwabe tires and Continental 40MM steel stem tubes. I've had more stem fail flats than any other. I like the steel schrader stem with the lock nut.

            Comment


              #7
              The toughest tires on the planet are Tannus Tires. They are foam. There are some drawbacks - There is only one distributor in the USA.
              They only have tires available 16, 20, 26, 700 sizes. I will never buy a bike that cannot use these tires - I avoid all fat bikes / odd sized tires. The downside is some rolling resistance. Perfect for low powered ebikes.


              Choosing the correct Tannus tire size for your bike using locking pin chart.

              Comment


                #8
                All the sealants will dry out over time, I add more when the seasons change through the valve stem to keep track of it, it's pretty painless. Orange Seal doesn't produce Stanimals like stans does and I like it a little better. They will seal big punctures like nails and stuff, the problem being if they don't, you've got a mess on your hands when you want to stick a tube in. The do rely on the tire pressure to force the sealant and the particles in it into the puncture, I'm not sure if low pressure fat bike tires are a problem because of this. I don't have any experience with them.

                Part of the issue is those big tires will pick up a lot more stuff than a skinny tire. Low pressures actually help with flats, there's less force on the individual pointy thing with a softer tire. I'd guess the majority of your problem is the width and the weight, neither you can really change.

                The fat bike threads on bike forums have a lot of discussion about tubeless, it would be worthwhile to visit.

                Comment


                  #9
                  I haven't had a single flat on my hot rod rear DD hub build. I switched to DOT moped tires. they are heavier, and the rim + spokes were pricey, but....the actual tires (the part I expect to frequently wear out) is not expensive at all. Since going to moped 19-inch rim and 12-ga spokes, no broken spokes or flat tires, which is very nice because rear DD hubs are heavy. My daily mid drive commuter is all bicycle stuff to keep it light.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Thanks for all the helpful responses. Here is one article: http://www.slowtwitch.com/Products/T...ants_2765.html

                    And the followup article: http://www.slowtwitch.com/Products/T...rt_2_4155.html

                    lt is hard to believe this video is real: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FTlZvOVG8zs
                    Last edited by commuter ebikes; 07-21-2016, 11:54 PM.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I'm got to comment. IF I built anything faster than the BBSHD I'd take Ron;s advice and look for moped rims and tires. Heidenau, German tires were the best I ever ran on higher speed two wheels. They make some really nice meed tires!

                      Comment


                        #12
                        I still run light-weight bicycle stuff on the front tire. However, my hot rod has a heavy direct drive motor in the wheel, and that used to drive road debris into it. The front tire always seemed to "float" over road-crap. So, my rear tire got all the flats...

                        Comment


                          #13
                          I fixed the flat with three Mr. Tuffy tire liners, three old tubes and 16 oz. of green slime. In the future, I will be using the trimmed old tires (as tire liners) that I keep referring to in this thread, along with Stan's NoTubes...in the tube.

                          The phenomenon of the front tire floating over the debris and the heavy rear getting the flat occurs to me 90% of the time.

                          If I were to do it over again, I would use a moped tire in the rear because I have been told that the rubber is 1/2" thick. Like I said, however, my frames were designed around a specific large rear tire size so I will just have to get the 1/2" of rubber by way of multiple layers of trimmed old tires.

                          I will post in this thread how the Stan's NoTubes does in the butyl rubber tubes.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Hey CE, are you sure they're not an option? Some are really close in sizing. Have you seen the 19" wheel thread on ES? 19" Motorcycle Wheels vs 26" Bicycle Wheels (rim and tires)


                            https://endless-sphere.com/forums/vi...hp?f=2&t=55458

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by Louis Luna View Post
                              Hey CE, are you sure they're not an option? Some are really close in sizing. Have you seen the 19" wheel thread on ES? 19" Motorcycle Wheels vs 26" Bicycle Wheels (rim and tires)




                              https://endless-sphere.com/forums/vi...hp?f=2&t=55458
                              I will check it out. I have two 26" tire sizes:
                              (1) 4.80" wide X 30.5" tall, and
                              (2) 5.05" wide X 31.5" tall.

                              I will search for motorcycle tires that approach (but not exceed!) this.

                              Remember, if I find one that is close, I can just buy the moto tire, trim off the bead and use it as a tire liner.

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