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Avoiding flat tires: slime, tire liners & more tire liners.

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  • Alan B
    replied
    Click image for larger version

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    Some days you just can't win.

    I think you could use a moped tire in the rear, which is basically a light motorcycle tire. You might need to change the rim to get it to fit properly. I put about 8000 miles on moped tires, and they are cheap and tough. Thread depth on my Gazelles was 0.375, and that's just the tread part, there's still thick rubber under that. On two occasions in about 3 years a sharp nail managed to fully penetrate the rear tire. Other hazards are less troublesome. I had one flat on my mountain bike that turned out to be a little piece of stainless steel wire from a belted radial. That little steel wire wouldn't have endangered the moped tire. But a long enough sharp nail will puncture it when conditions are right.

    Converting to tubeless is reportedly a good way to go. The tires reseal much better than tubes, and you can plug a tire without removing it while on the road.

    Leave a comment:


  • commuter ebikes
    replied
    A 120/50-26 tire would be 30.72" tall, according to this calculation that I found on the internet:

    120/50-26 = 120*.50 = 60 / 25.4 x 2 (2 sidewalls) = 4.72″ + 26″ rim = 30.72″

    I have six Cromotors already laced into six Surly Rolling Darryl rims, so it would be a big investment to change wheel types. I may buy one of these moto tires, trim it and use it as a tire liner.

    It does look like it would make for a great tire liner http://www.jpcycles.com/product/179-323 :

    Click image for larger version

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    Vee Rubber makes a motorcycle tube (also sometimes referred to as a tire hose) https://www.amazon.com/Vee-Rubber-Mo.../dp/B00SAFSXLU for the above tire.

    I imagine it has a Schrader valve and hopefully a thicker rubber wall than bicycle tubes. Click image for larger version

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    The latest online version of Vee Rubber's motorcycle catalog does not include 26" tubes, so this must be a new product.

    Too bad the bicycle tube manufacturers do not yet offer a thorn resistant fat tire tube!
    Last edited by commuter ebikes; 07-24-2016, 02:19 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • commuter ebikes
    replied
    Originally posted by Louis Luna View Post
    Hey CE, are you sure they're not an option? Some are really close in sizing. Have you seen the 19" wheel thread on ES? 19" Motorcycle Wheels vs 26" Bicycle Wheels (rim and tires)




    https://endless-sphere.com/forums/vi...hp?f=2&t=55458
    I will check it out. I have two 26" tire sizes:
    (1) 4.80" wide X 30.5" tall, and
    (2) 5.05" wide X 31.5" tall.

    I will search for motorcycle tires that approach (but not exceed!) this.

    Remember, if I find one that is close, I can just buy the moto tire, trim off the bead and use it as a tire liner.

    Leave a comment:


  • Louis
    replied
    Hey CE, are you sure they're not an option? Some are really close in sizing. Have you seen the 19" wheel thread on ES? 19" Motorcycle Wheels vs 26" Bicycle Wheels (rim and tires)


    https://endless-sphere.com/forums/vi...hp?f=2&t=55458

    Leave a comment:


  • commuter ebikes
    replied
    I fixed the flat with three Mr. Tuffy tire liners, three old tubes and 16 oz. of green slime. In the future, I will be using the trimmed old tires (as tire liners) that I keep referring to in this thread, along with Stan's NoTubes...in the tube.

    The phenomenon of the front tire floating over the debris and the heavy rear getting the flat occurs to me 90% of the time.

    If I were to do it over again, I would use a moped tire in the rear because I have been told that the rubber is 1/2" thick. Like I said, however, my frames were designed around a specific large rear tire size so I will just have to get the 1/2" of rubber by way of multiple layers of trimmed old tires.

    I will post in this thread how the Stan's NoTubes does in the butyl rubber tubes.

    Leave a comment:


  • spinningmagnets
    replied
    I still run light-weight bicycle stuff on the front tire. However, my hot rod has a heavy direct drive motor in the wheel, and that used to drive road debris into it. The front tire always seemed to "float" over road-crap. So, my rear tire got all the flats...

    Leave a comment:


  • Louis
    replied
    I'm got to comment. IF I built anything faster than the BBSHD I'd take Ron;s advice and look for moped rims and tires. Heidenau, German tires were the best I ever ran on higher speed two wheels. They make some really nice meed tires!

    Leave a comment:


  • commuter ebikes
    replied
    Thanks for all the helpful responses. Here is one article: http://www.slowtwitch.com/Products/T...ants_2765.html

    And the followup article: http://www.slowtwitch.com/Products/T...rt_2_4155.html

    lt is hard to believe this video is real: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FTlZvOVG8zs
    Last edited by commuter ebikes; 07-21-2016, 11:54 PM.

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  • spinningmagnets
    replied
    I haven't had a single flat on my hot rod rear DD hub build. I switched to DOT moped tires. they are heavier, and the rim + spokes were pricey, but....the actual tires (the part I expect to frequently wear out) is not expensive at all. Since going to moped 19-inch rim and 12-ga spokes, no broken spokes or flat tires, which is very nice because rear DD hubs are heavy. My daily mid drive commuter is all bicycle stuff to keep it light.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sneakers915
    replied
    All the sealants will dry out over time, I add more when the seasons change through the valve stem to keep track of it, it's pretty painless. Orange Seal doesn't produce Stanimals like stans does and I like it a little better. They will seal big punctures like nails and stuff, the problem being if they don't, you've got a mess on your hands when you want to stick a tube in. The do rely on the tire pressure to force the sealant and the particles in it into the puncture, I'm not sure if low pressure fat bike tires are a problem because of this. I don't have any experience with them.

    Part of the issue is those big tires will pick up a lot more stuff than a skinny tire. Low pressures actually help with flats, there's less force on the individual pointy thing with a softer tire. I'd guess the majority of your problem is the width and the weight, neither you can really change.

    The fat bike threads on bike forums have a lot of discussion about tubeless, it would be worthwhile to visit.

    Leave a comment:


  • osmaster
    replied
    The toughest tires on the planet are Tannus Tires. They are foam. There are some drawbacks - There is only one distributor in the USA.
    They only have tires available 16, 20, 26, 700 sizes. I will never buy a bike that cannot use these tires - I avoid all fat bikes / odd sized tires. The downside is some rolling resistance. Perfect for low powered ebikes.


    Choosing the correct Tannus tire size for your bike using locking pin chart.

    Leave a comment:


  • Louis
    replied
    Schwabe tires and Continental 40MM steel stem tubes. I've had more stem fail flats than any other. I like the steel schrader stem with the lock nut.

    Leave a comment:


  • CRUISER_DON
    replied
    Long ago in the days of super powers i used rawhide strips to help from getting curb / pot hole pinches and found that all but the worst punctures were stopped short. Draw back would be similar to using old tire. These days now that super powers are all used up, i don't worry about it much.

    Leave a comment:


  • OptimusPrime
    replied
    With that kind of weight and speed you probably need to look into a motorcycle tire for that bike.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sather
    replied
    Look on the mountain bike forums. I saw a test where all the available tubeless products were tested on punctures. I think Orange Seal did the best, but now Stan's has a product specifically for punctures that was not tested. I use Orange seal for tubeless and it dries out completely in less than 6 months and you have to stick in more. If you come across any additional tests, please post it.

    Leave a comment:

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