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    Recommended batteries

    I have a Voilamart 48v 1000w rear hub motor kit. I want to get a safe quality battery with about 10-15ah capacity. I don't want to spend a ton of $$ on it. Does anyone have a recommendation? I'm mostly concerned that it's a safely built battery to prevent the risk of fire.

    Thanks

    #2
    The battery is an area you just have to spend some money especially if you are concerned about safety which is a good thing to be concerned about. A safe battery just takes money. Has to start with decent quality parts and they have to be properly assembled into a properly designed package that is practical to properly mount on a bicycle.

    Get it from a North American vendor that has a long (hopefully good) history. To figure out how long they have been around just do a search and look at the dates when people were talking about them.

    Companies like Unit Pack power have had some ups and downs for quality, I'm not sure where they are at now or if anyone 'local' is selling them or if its only direct. Em3ev has seemed to have a pretty consistent decent rep but I think also only sells direct. Those are about the only brands that have been around, it seems like the rest are kinda unknown and may not be the same twice.

    I kinda like the Grin EZ flat packs. Note if you buy one of those they have a hazardous freight import charge you have to figure into your total cost.
    Here are all of Grin's battery packs currently for sale, including Reention case downtube batteries, rear rack eZee packs, and some small bottle shape batteries for lighter builds. For a higher-level description of the battery options, view our battery info page.


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      #3
      Originally posted by u156531 View Post
      I have a Voilamart 48v 1000w rear hub motor kit. I want to get a safe quality battery with about 10-15ah capacity. I don't want to spend a ton of $$ on it. Does anyone have a recommendation? I'm mostly concerned that it's a safely built battery to prevent the risk of fire.

      Thanks
      these guys sell quality batteries . https://www.electrifybike.com/collections/48v-Batteries
      also You might want to consider a 52v battery for a little extra pep my 48v bafang BBHD calls for a 48v but I run 52v with no issues and the difference is noticable
        52v Batteries Batteries from Electrify Bike Company utilize the latest 21700 cell technology from the leading brands making safe Lithium Ion cells. The cells we use are all top-of-the-line high-capacity/high-power cells from Samsung, Panasonic, and LG. You won't find batteries of the same size with higher capacity be

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        #4
        Im in Vancouver Canada. My first Ebike kit was a hub drive kit from Grin. Their 14 AH battery(Hailong I assume) was good for 18,000K, 4 1/2 years.Their prices are high in general but a good place to start until you realize all components are made in China and they are good at it. Now Ive built with a Bafang BBSHD kit. Igot a 19AH battery from a place in Hamilton,Ontario called"Affordable Ebikes".
        They built me a battery to my specs and all good a year in. Good price, nice shop. As far as battery safety, Im always interested. Most problems Ive heard are people mix and matching chargers. Dont do that,use only the charger that came with it or with the exact specs. I also use a mechanical plug in timer so 6.5 hrs for a full charge and it shuts off.

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          #5
          When selecting a battery for your electric bike, it's important to prioritize safety and quality to prevent the risk of fire or other hazards. Here are a few tips for finding a safe and reliable battery that won't break the bank:
          1. Look for batteries from reputable brands: Stick with well-known brands that have a reputation for producing high-quality batteries. Avoid purchasing batteries from unknown brands or sellers with limited information or reviews.
          2. Choose a battery with a built-in management system: Look for batteries that have built-in BMS (Battery Management System) to ensure safe charging and discharging of the battery, and to prevent overcharging, overheating, and other potential safety hazards.
          3. Check for UL certification: UL certification is a safety standard that indicates that the battery has been tested and meets certain safety criteria. While not all safe batteries will have UL certification, it can be a good indicator of quality.
          4. Consider the capacity and voltage: For your 48v 1000w motor, you'll want to look for a battery with a similar voltage and capacity. A capacity of 10-15Ah should be sufficient for most riders, but you may want to consider a higher capacity battery if you plan on using your bike for long distances or frequent use.
          5. Check the warranty: Make sure that the battery you're considering comes with a warranty to protect your investment in case of defects or other issues.

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            #6
            Originally posted by 11111energy View Post
            [*]Choose a battery with a built-in management system: Look for batteries that have built-in BMS (Battery Management System)[*]Consider the capacity and voltage: For your 48v 1000w motor, you'll want to look for a battery with a similar voltage and capacity. A capacity of 10-15Ah should be sufficient for most riders, but you may want to consider a higher capacity battery if you plan on using your bike for long distances or frequent use. ​
            ​[/QUOTE]

            BMS, thats a given. There should never be a battery pack sold without its own BMS.

            Capacity and voltage. My experience after my first 4 1/2 years 18,000K trouble free battery... Bigger capacity is always nice. Any kind of hills will use your battery alot quicker than riding on flatland. So consider your style of riding . I routinely go out for 50-60K. If Im going to the mountains I pedal on the flatland parts as much as I can to save my battery for the grunt up the hills. The higher the voltage you get the better for torque but the more battery you need so its a tradeoff. So in my case, I knew from experience that I wanted the biggest 48V downtube pack I could get which is 19 AH. Another way to do it is having a primary average size pack and add a secondary battery pack on a long day trip.

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