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    #76
    Any experience here yet with the relatively new Tannus armour tire insert? Surprisingly it doesn't weigh that much - dunno about heat generation/retention:
    Click image for larger versionName:	Tannus-RoadArmour-Puncture-whitebg.gifViews:	0Size:	33.0 KBID:	96051

    Comment


    • Retrorockit
      Retrorockit commented
      Editing a comment
      I did a thread on my Tannus experience.
      I ordered a couple of these for my bike. Kind of like pool noodles made for bike tires. 15mm thick which with Scwalbe Big Ben Plus e bike tires=20mm flat protection.. They claim smoother ride, better grip, and some run flat capability. I didn't watch any Youtube , I just dived right in like an average bicycle enthusiast As

      AZ's tubeless sealant in a tube really works. I kept the Tannus in the rear on my HT for ride/ traction reasons.I did go to thinner versions of my Schwalbe tires in either case. I'm using Effeto Mariposa Caffelatex tire sealnt. I've Stans (clumos uo with CO2) Orange Seal.But the Mariposa was sent by mistake
      and looks like good stuff also.

    #77
    Nowadays I use Stan’s in my tubes with no tire liners at all. I have had ZERO flat tires since switching to Stan’s.

    Comment


    • ncmired
      ncmired commented
      Editing a comment
      That's GREAT to hear - hope the Christmas ramp-up at work goes ok.

    • calfee20
      calfee20 commented
      Editing a comment
      I just switched to Stans IN the tubes myself. Good to see you are still posting.

    #78
    I know, this is an old thread. It is very interesting though and I just thought I'd share my experience I have an old Iron Horse Maverick 1.0 hardtail that I converted to an e-bike with a kit from Amazon. It's a decent kit on the cheap, $379 for everything including the battery. It's a 48 volt 13 aH battery and the motor is rated at 500W/750W peak. It goes 25MPH on full throttle or level 5 pedal assist. I'm not not sure which is off, the bike or the speed reminder that the city has on my street but one of them is 2 MPH off because when I go by it, it always registers me at 23 while the display says 25. It's always 2 MPH because if I go by on level 4 mine will say 20 and it will say 18, level 3 mine reads 15, the sign reads 13, etc.

    Anyway, I use it daily as a commuter bike since the CVT in my car decided to take a dump on me. I also use it for errands and such most of the time. I got a small trailer for the bike to get groceries and cart my tools around from job to job as I am in construction so I'm not always at the same location and some of them can be quite far so I'm on the road a lot. I have struggled with many flats and have also taken many measures to avoid them because it always seems to be the rear one and it's a pain in the rear to remove and replace it. I assume this is because the debris is laying flat on the road surface and the front tire disturbs it and the rear tire takes whatever orientation it's in from the front throwing the thing responsible for puncturing the rear tire up and the rear gets it, every time. I don't recall even having a flat on the front, which is super easy to remove. Perhaps I should have chosen the motor hub that goes on the front instead but I didn't think of this whole flat tire business when I bought it.

    I don't know if it's from the higher speeds or the extra weight of the bike from the kit or a combination of the 2 but I get far more flats since installing the kit and turning my bike into an e-bike. In any case though it has been a factor At first I bought the Slime tubes and tube liners which lessened the issue but didn't eliminate it. I'd say it cut down on the occurrence of flats by about half. I dislike patching the slime tubes because of the sealant, it makes a huge mess and also makes patching very difficult. They claim to be self sealing however I did not find that claim to be true. Obviously the tube liners are too thin because the tubes have quite a bit of extra rubber at the tire side where most punctures occur. I pushed a thumb tack through with ease so although they may be a good idea, the material they use is not very puncture proof.

    Then I got the idea to find something around the house that would be a bit more puncture proof than store bought liners as they are all made out of the same non puncture proof garbage. Wouldn't you think that if the industry was going to design a product that was supposed to be puncture proof that they would choose a material that actually is puncture proof? Oh, that's right, why would they do that when if they did, you wouldn't need to buy more! I didn't buy more, I went to finding alternative means. I've tried several types of tape from standard duct tape, HVAC sealing tape, and poly tape with varying degrees of effectiveness, however not much better than the liners.

    I've also tried several different brands and types of tires. As one would expect, the tires with the best puncture resistance are the super aggressive and expensive off road tires but they have more rolling resistance and usually require lower pressures which both affect the battery longevity. Some of the sites I have to get to are far enough to just about fully drain the battery and a bike with a dead battery is much harder to pedal without power so in order to maximize battery life I prefer less aggressive road tires with higher pressures which are also a little less hard to pedal if I do run the battery down or shut it off through less hilly areas to make it last longer before draining it but even with tires with lower rolling resistance, it's still no fun pedaling a dead e-bike. I have been trying to save enough to get a second battery but they are heavy which adds a significant amount of weight to the overall weight of the bike and myself and I don't use the trailer most of the time because if I do kill the battery or something else goes wrong I'm not able to take the bike, trailer, and myself on public transportation forcing me to leave it locked up somewhere until I go back for it and the Denver metro area is not a good place to leave anything, even if it's locked up. It seems since the police have more important things to do, such as bother law abiding citizens and hang out shooting the breeze that there are no consequences for thieves so they just take whatever they can get their grubby hands on. I think that if a couple of them got their grubby hands taken away it wouldn't be long before word got around in their circles and the problem might just go away but that would be mean, and we can't go around being mean in this softened state of society who are constantly complaining about being violated. Hmmm, isn't that a paradox. I can't speak my mind with an ounce of truth without being shunned or possibly even prosecuted these days but complete dirt bags can steal all my stuff and they don't face any consequences. Also I could end up in jail if I were to catch them in the act and take defensive measures! What kind of world have we created here anyway? Seems a bit upside down to me!

    Anyway, back to the matter at hand here, I have been thinking a lot about different materials that could be used as tube liners which might actually work. I read early in this thread about leather belt material which gave me the idea of nylon belt material and taking a torch to the side that would be against the tire so as to create a puncture resistant layer from the melting and cooling of the nylon fibers. Some nylon products similar to belt and strap applications are quite thick as well such as tow straps and the ones that they use on big trailers for holding down the load for fat tire applications. So I am going to search for sources where good deals can be found and give this a shot. If anyone has done this or anything similar, please let me know how it worked. Also if I test it before I get any feedback, I will respond with the results.

    Comment


      #79
      Slime never worked well for me in any application (bikes, motos, etc.)

      There are sealants that do work very well - take it from someone that rides the AZ desert, land of pointy things... before good sealant used to get a flat every other ride or so

      Most tubeless sealants will work just fine in tubes, I've used stans for years with excellent results (no flats @ 10Kmi)... been trying something new but since it's still quite early can't comment good or bad... other's have reported similarly good results with the orange stuff

      Never had great luck with liners... pain in the arse and if a plain liner (vs. tannus, etc.) just slowed things down but there are too many large thorns out here that go right through them and since the sealant works so well, not going to bother with them...

      Comment


      • Retrorockit
        Retrorockit commented
        Editing a comment
        AZ is right. Tubeless sealant works great for flats. I save weight on tires by skipping the flat prevention layers. I do run a Tannus in the rear on my HT street bike, but it's there for a smooth ride more than flat prevention.It does cost some range.

      #80
      Click image for larger version

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ID:	166874 Wasn't aware of this thread.... I was concerned about flats because my new street tires have a much thinner tread then the old knobbies. Looked at available liners but thought they were over priced and had questionable reviews. So I looked for an alternative. Came across freezer curtain strips, for those who aren't familiar, they are flexible pvc and available in various widths and thicknesses.
      I purchased a roll 300mm x 3mm thick, 3 meters long from Amazon. Cut it lenght wise into 100mm strips. Works great so far, I inspect the tires after every ride, once found a piece of glass and a construction staple another time. Pretty sure both went through the tire but not the liner.

      Comment


      • AZguy
        AZguy commented
        Editing a comment
        Might work with the goat heads - most common enemy out here, but unfortunately we have tons of long very pointy spines that are often as much as 2mm dia... they will poke through stuff like that as though it isn't there.... out here the sealant is the only real good defense and the LBS's all know it and will provide stans or the orange stuff... some even sell flat "insurance"... bit of a racket... they tell you to pay a monthly/yearly fee for them to fix all your flats and the first thing they do is fill the tube with stans and then you don't get flats anymore... heck I do this for anyone that just brings their bike around and buys the beer... track record is outstanding...

      • Retrorockit
        Retrorockit commented
        Editing a comment
        My street flat problem was steel belted tire wires form blowouts. Hard to find. More than one is common and you don't know where you picked them up.The tire seaalnt puts a stop to all of that.The Tannus is about 13mm thick so it takes apretty big chunk to get through.

      • Cyclops
        Cyclops commented
        Editing a comment
        This stuff is pretty tough, I don't think wire from tires would get through it. No idea about the thorns AZ has to deal with though.

      #81
      I also get many of my flats from the steel belt wires! I was wondering exactly what that wire was from, now I know, and that makes much more sense.

      On the subject of sealants, I've read a few different comments about Stan's and the "orange stuff" as well as the green slime with different size chunks. I run standard Schrader stems as the presta "advantages" do me no service and I like the convenience of being able to stop at any gas station with a working air machine or stopping at a local auto shop for air when I'm out and about in unfamiliar territory so the possible issue of chunk size going through presta stems does not matter to me. I am however a bit confused as I recall one post mentioning both the "orange stuff" and Stan's and am wondering if they were used in combination or each at different times? In fact any more info on sealants is welcomed, especially concerning maintenance and repair/replacement options for controlling and containing the mess. I don't have a garage or shop type setting to work in, I'm usually inside my apartment with cardboard and or drop cloths to control oil and grease drops/drips but when I was trying to repair a flat with the slime tubes I had the stuff just got everywhere and wouldn't stop oozing out and running everywhere and I got so frustrated that I just cut the tube into many pieces and threw the entire mess in the trash and spent the next hour with hot water, rags, and a scrub brush cleaning up the fallout from my meltdown. I hate messy crap!

      Comment


      • Retrorockit
        Retrorockit commented
        Editing a comment
        Stan's was the original tubeless tire conversion sealant and has a good reputation from the success of that. But like a lot of things that work for racers, it was found to have a couple issues in real world use for some riders. Corrosiveness was one(carbon fiber rim damge) the other was clumping if exposed to the cold of a CO2 cgarge. The Green Slime never really worked and made a big mess with any good sized puncture. It did seal up the little wire holes. LBS in my area stopped carrying Stans and went with Orange Seal due to the CO2 issue. It works too. I ordered some Effeto Mariposa chain lube and they sent a liter of their tire sealnt by mistake. it's supposed to foam up in the tire while riding and they have some videos of flat repairs up to 1/4". They also have a catalyst injector for even bigger stuff. I haven't had a flat since using any of these in my tubes. I did have some clump up over time. Not really sure which one. It was in a bike I wasn;t riding very much. I always carry a spare tube, and have a core removal cap on one of my tire stems. I f a core gets plugged I can swap it out if needed.
        A blown out truck tire can spread wires for miles since the tire next to it allows the truck to keep going.This is why multiple punctures are common.
        In my opinion Presta valves maintain strength in skinny lightweight rims due to a smaller hole. This doesn't apply to my wider triple hollow DH style rims.
        Last edited by Retrorockit; 3 weeks ago.

      • AZguy
        AZguy commented
        Editing a comment
        Stans regular stuff is super thin, more like smelly white water.. like all the other sealants that work (not slime!) no worries about going in presta or schrader... sometimes they can clog the valve though... easy enough to prevent, just get in the habit of making sure the valve is at around the 5 or 7 o'clock for a short time to allow the sealant to run out before checking pressure, etc.... if it does clog then pull the valve core out and clean with a pipe cleaner... but prevention is best medicine... with tubes if you let all the air out it can cause some issues when reinflating if the tire is full of thorns (like mine always are) since they'll poke and tear the tube as it inflates...

        It can be messy but once you figure things out it's very easy to do with no mess

        I fill the tubes with sealant with the tubes out of the tires in the sink using a syringe before ever putting them into the tires... generally no mess but just in case any spillage just goes into the sink... if for some reason replacing the sealant I rinse them out before replacing using the syringe...be careful when reseating the beads... some cheap rims can allow the tube to push through the gap between rim and tire - this is an issue independent of the sealant but if this happens and the tube blows you will have a major mess (don't ask how I know) and stans will permanently stain unless you wash it out immediately (water works, again don't ask)...

      • Retrorockit
        Retrorockit commented
        Editing a comment
        I seat the beads with air. Then put the sealant in with a syringe. I do this outside on the car porch.Of course my climate may be more suitable for this than most. That way if a bead doesn't seat, or I put a directional tire on backwards I can do a rework with no sealnt involved. Of course AZ is an aircraft guy and probably just does it right the first time.

      #82
      Thanks a bunch for all the responses and info. I'm going to dig into it a bit further. For now, my LBS had a spring sale event and I scored some Specialized thorn proof tubes for $10 each so I bought a 6 pack. They are quite thick, stiff, and a bit on the heavy side but having a motor on the bike now gives me a bit more freedom in the weight category. I still pack as light as possible depending on my reason for going out, but although the kit I bought is not expensive, it's pretty good at pulling quite a bit of weight. My trailer is rated for 88lbs but I've had well over 100lbs in it on several occasions and I was more concerned about the tongue bar bending than anything to do with the motor handling the load. It's made out of steel so it's not light to begin with and with even heavy loads, me at about 175lbs and a backpack stuffed with a good 4o to 50lb load, it still climbs out of the bowl with ease.

      I say "the bowl" because I live in one, so to speak. There's no way out of my neighborhood without climbing a hill. There are several ways out going in all directions and some are steeper, although faster while there is one where it's a very long low grade climb. The steep climb is the most convenient as far as the direction I usually am headed in and before I converted my bike, was daunting and exhausting, especially at 4am when it's snowing like mad so I started taking the long way with the least steep climb but it's directly opposite the way I leave most of the time and added a good half hour to my commute so I was having to leave at 3:15 to make it to work for 6:am at the job I was doing at the time and although I wasn't exhausted as fast, I still was. I'm 52 and have been a full time smoker all my life. My family used to smoke in the house when I was little so I do mean ALL my life. I'm actually very fortunate to be able to breathe at all and I still do for the most part. I don't even really like saying it because it makes me think of how horribly my body has been treated all these years and how others have lung diseases at early ages but it is what it is and all I can do is be thankful and appreciate every day I have, which I do. Apologies for the rather pointless story, sometimes I just go off and rather than delete it, I just go with it.

      So my next question is, are the advantages of going tubeless worth the cost of buying all new wheels, tires, and all the other stuff that's necessary to do it? I run 26x2.1 to 2.25 tires normally on standard disk brake wheels, which if I recall are a bit narrower than rim brake wheels, but I'm not 100% on that. They do certainly appear to be although it has been a while since I've seen a rim brake wheel next to a disk brake one. I have read from a few DIYers that it's possible to go 2bliss with standard equipment, it just takes some creativity but I'm not sure about that. I do like to be creative with certain things but I'm not so keen on attempting too many experiments with my bike tires. So I'm more inclined to just drop the funds for the proper equipment.

      Comment


      • Retrorockit
        Retrorockit commented
        Editing a comment
        I think most of us here don't bother with tubeless. Just use the tubeless sealer in the tubes. The offroad guys like it for lower pressure and no pinch flats. But for street there's not much in it. AZ is a fat tire guy and low pressure is standard in that format with tubes. Plus those rims usually have huge holes in them between the spokes.I suppose racers like the lower weight. I save weight running thinner (normal) tires, and normal tubes. I do run a tannus in the rear, but not so much for flat protection, as smoother ride at high speeds (and medium speeds too).

      #83
      Interesting. I like it, saves me some money to put towards a fat tire bike. I have not played around with wheel and tire set ups for different things, I usually just keep everything matched evenly front and rear. I have read about it in several forums but I generally have old used equipment and I'm not that tuned in to it. I hardly ever see those $2,000 to $15,000 bikes on the trails I ride which indicates to me that those guys are elsewhere in more technical and extreme riding arenas where I wouldn't survive a minute with my old dinosaurs lol

      Comment


        #84
        Is Stan's better than Orange Seal? or vise versa? Which one is better for just daily commute, mostly paved concrete trails and streets. Lots of pot holes and debris on the side of the roads in most areas.
        Last edited by X$IV; 2 weeks ago.

        Comment


        • Retrorockit
          Retrorockit commented
          Editing a comment
          My LBS guys said they stopped carrying Stan's because of corrosion on some bike parts and finishes., and clumping up with CO2 ( which is very cold going into the tire). AZ says it takes 2x as much to treat a tire. I moved on to Mariposa Caffelatex.because i got some for free so I can't says from experience except no flats with any of them.(Except the Green Slime.)
          FWIW Schwalbe now sells Stan's to use inside tubes.
          Last edited by Retrorockit; 2 weeks ago.

        • AZguy
          AZguy commented
          Editing a comment
          I use 2x of anything I put in there...

          Been trying something different (forgot the name) and in a year or so will report

          Not so sure about corrosion, it does smell nasty but my understanding is there's nothing corrosive in it (I once looked at the MSDS)... more or less like latex glue in antifreeze... if you don't wipe it off of stuff quickly it will stain - perhaps that's what they are complaining about..

        • Retrorockit
          Retrorockit commented
          Editing a comment
          Schwalbe only rated a few of their tires for tubeless conversion, citing damage to the casing of other tires.
          The kid at the LBS was probably not an expert. But Orange was all they had, and I've seen that in other shops in the area.
          Between wearing out my rear tires fairly often, and swapping out the heavy flat prevention tires for lighter versions, my stuff doesn't seem to die from old age.

        #85
        OK, thanks for the responses. My bike is nothing I really worry about corrosion with, it's old and wasn't the greatest to begin with. I bought the wheelset from eBay for $129+tax and the e-bike kit came with the wheel which isn't anything high quality either and I'm able to build and lace wheels, but I wasn't looking forward to having to replace the sealant that often. I was only referring to those 2 brands because they seem to be the most popular but I did see quite a few others while shopping around. Any input on alternatives is welcome as well. It's not a price thing, both Stan's and the orange aren't very expensive. I'm usually looking for whatever works the best all around.

        Comment


        • Retrorockit
          Retrorockit commented
          Editing a comment
          Stan's and Orange seem to be the standards. They probably don't mix well, I would go with whatever is popular in your area. The Effetto Mariposa stuff is high end. I got some by mistake form a Wippwermann chain v.endor. Their Floerpower drip wax is top shelf also, but performs well at Zero friction Cycling.

        • AZguy
          AZguy commented
          Editing a comment
          Pretty sure you will find folks that are in both camps that prefer one over the other for whatever reasons... I think they are close enough I'd just go get some of whatever's out there and either way you will be so much further ahead...

        #86

        Pretty sure you will find folks that are in both camps that prefer one over the other for whatever reasons... I think they are close enough I'd just go get some of whatever's out there and either way you will be so much further ahead...
        I'm going with this, and thank you all for the information.
        Now I've gotta head over to batteries...

        Comment


          #87
          I did buy some polyester webbing strap material. I got 2" wide stuff, just some clearance stuff they were getting rid of super cheap. I got 29' for around $7 and a couple bucks for shipping. It's about 3mm thick. I tried to get one side of it hot enough to form a hard shell but it curls inward and when I tried to curl it the opposite way so that the melted side would be facing the tire, it defeats the purpose because it gets really brittle after heating and just cracks apart. I did put it in the tires as a tube liner anyway, because I bought it, didn't have anything, and because it will give me 3mm or so extra room. A thumb tack goes right through the webbing so it won't help much if something gets through the Hardrock'r FlakJacket and it but it's better than the useless Slime ones that were paper thin and a thumbtack went through those even easier so I fugure it's better than not and having the webbing around. I'm sure I could have found another purpose for it but I didn't feel like thinking that much yesterday so I said, what the heck, it certainly can't hurt. It's not very heavy and I'm not a weight watcher too much since I got the e-bike status.

          Comment


          • AZguy
            AZguy commented
            Editing a comment
            Out here the thorns are much longer and pointier than even a thumbtack but that seems an interesting test... the thing to remember though is that the force pushing the pointy piece into tire and tube is very high, especially the rear wheel (no wonder that's where I pick up most thorns), much higher than you can push a thumbtack... close to body weight! So for me best defense is to shrug my shoulders at trying to prevent the thorns from entering and just make sure the punctures don't cause a flat (sealant)...

            A couple of points about sealant... after puncture the wheel needs to keep turning (keep riding!) to seal and likely the biggest rule is don't pull the thorns out - just let them be (keep riding! - don't pick the scab!).... If the tire is full of thorns and you let the air out for whatever reason (e.g. topping off/replacing sealant) best to pull the tire, turn it inside out, rub your hand carefully over the inside of the tire to find all the pointy stuff and trim them (I just clip with wire cutters) so they don't poke the tube when you reinflate it....

          • Retrorockit
            Retrorockit commented
            Editing a comment
            Another reason I went away form the flat prevention tires is the tiny wires can get stuck inside there, and you can't find them to pull them out, but when you ride they poke holes in the tube. I had to scrap a tire over that. Sealer all the way now.

          #88
          Out here the thorns are much longer and pointier than even a thumbtack but that seems an interesting test... the thing to remember though is that the force pushing the pointy piece into tire and tube is very high, especially the rear wheel (no wonder that's where I pick up most thorns), much higher than you can push a thumbtack... close to body weight! So for me best defense is to shrug my shoulders at trying to prevent the thorns from entering and just make sure the punctures don't cause a flat (sealant)...
          I'm in Denver CO. area, a little west, closer to the foothills and there are goat heads here too but they must be wimpy compared to the AZ ones because although there are usually at least a few of their little thorns stuck in the treads, they are rarely long enough to get to the tube with a decent set of knobbies. I have a few different wheels with tires and the ones on there currently are Specialized Hardrock'r with FlakJacket and so far nothing has penetrated those tires. However I prefer a less aggressive more road friendly tire for rolling resistance as the battery lasts considerably longer and some of my commutes are pushing my limits unless I leave an hour early and use level 3 PA... yeah, NO!

          I also have a set of Michelin Country Trail and Country AT that are good tires and I don't recall getting any flats from thorns. The set of Innova tires I got for road use and the Michelin Pro Tek Cross tires I have however I believe a bee could cause a flat if it stung the tire. I had to replace one of the Michelins because my kick stand fell off and when the rear wheel ran over it, the rear tire was completely torn to shreds. That was a fun day, I was quite a distance from home and no spare nor any bike shop nearby however after walking the bike for about 10 minutes I got an idea. I always have a bunch of zip ties with me. I get them free by following the sparkys around on the job sites and they are quite handy. On this day I used a handful of them to hold the junk tire on the rim so that I could at least ride at a slow pace without ruining the wheel, which comes with the hub motor so definitely not an option. I spaced the zip ties out evenly around the wheel between spokes to keep what was left of the tire around the outer edges of the rim and just crept along slowly. I had to stop and replace a couple of the zip ties because the concrete wore through them but overall, it got me home much faster than walking would have and it was getting dark fast.

          Most of my flats are from road debris. The steel belts from blown tires, tons of hardware; screws nails and various other nuts n bits, and all kinds of other wonderful things, mostly what's left of vehicle parts though. There are lots of wrecks here between the sheer volume of traffic and a considerable amount of the population who I have no idea how they managed to get a drivers license and should definitely have it suspended until they find a clue on how to drive. And DOT nor the communities do any sort of clean up outside of taking a push broom and making a half a$$ attempt at sweeping the debris off the roadway.

          Anyway, my LBS recommended, and conveniently only carries the Muc-Off No Puncture Hassle Sealant. They showed me reviews and gave me a $5 discount from $24.99 to $19.99 for a 1 litre bottle and threw in a $6.99 injector kit and offered to give a demo because the tech said I looked "very skeptical" as he put it and they said if I get a flat from a normal puncture they'll give me a full refund and even a new tube. Can't beat that with a stick broom! I just put double the recommended amount in my Pro Teks and my trailer tubes. They are thorn resistant tubes to begin with, I just installed them and I left the polyester webbing there as a liner because it was already there and I didn't feel like taking all the wheels apart to take them out. I just popped the stem cores, injected the "pink stuff", put the cores back in, inflated the tubes and gave them all a few good spins. I shouldn't have any more flats outside of another catastrophic event like large sharp steel kick stand brackets.

          Comment


            #89
            A couple of points about sealant... after puncture the wheel needs to keep turning (keep riding!) to seal and likely the biggest rule is don't pull the thorns out - just let them be (keep riding! - don't pick the scab!).... If the tire is full of thorns and you let the air out for whatever reason (e.g. topping off/replacing sealant) best to pull the tire, turn it inside out, rub your hand carefully over the inside of the tire to find all the pointy stuff and trim them (I just clip with wire cutters) so they don't poke the tube when you reinflate it....
            Thanks a bunch for this... :-)
            Last edited by X$IV; 2 weeks ago.

            Comment


              #90
              Another reason I went away form the flat prevention tires is the tiny wires can get stuck inside there, and you can't find them to pull them out, but when you ride they poke holes in the tube. I had to scrap a tire over that. Sealer all the way now.
              I have experienced this. I did get it out although I had to prick my finger in order to find it by running my hand around the inside of the tire until I did indeed locate it and put a band aid on my finger and then pulled it out from the inside.

              Comment

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