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Running two chains.

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  • AZguy
    commented on 's reply
    Haha - reminds me of when my house got raided by narcotic task force - some idiot saw my beer brewing equipment and called them and it turns out they are even stupider than he...

  • JPLabs
    replied
    Funny pics. That's got to be pretty sketchy looking, to an outsider, LOL. Sure, your working on your bicycle, uh huh. Nothing odd here, move along.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hard Tail
    replied
    It took over a month but my ebay chain lube chemicals finally arrived from China. I can't believe a packet of white powder with no documentation simply arrived in the post, but there you are. I mixed up the concoction recommended by the Friction Facts website comprising of 1pound parifin wax, 5grams of pure PTFE and 1gram of molybdenum sulfide. Mixed it all up in my $15 rice cooker, cleaned my two chains and dropped them both in the brew.
    Interesting observation, the cooled wax blend is white , but once heated up in the molten state, it's black from the very small percentage of molybdenum.
    I've now done about 200klm commuting on my first chain. No issues so far. I plan to swap the chain over in a fortnight and then re treat them both each month. Now that I've mixed up my lube bath this is a relatively quick and easy process. I enjoy having a silent drive chain with easy gear shifts and the parafin wax certainly delivers this. Whether this will also deliver longevity and reliability is yet to be seen but I'm optimistic. I've also ordered a chain wear gauge so I might be able to add a semblance of scientific data to the discussion sometime next year.

    Leave a comment:


  • calfee20
    commented on 's reply
    That web site is worth a link. https://www.friction-facts.com/

  • Hard Tail
    commented on 's reply
    Hi Calfee. Thanks for the heads up. I was talking to an old educated mate of mine (who knows stuff) and he suggested the molly and PTFE additive before I actually read about it in Friction Facts website. I was a little surprised about how little molly they actually added to the wax though in their secret formula.That might explain why. We're talking 5grams or less than 1% of volume. I'd imagine that the PTFE and molly go to work after the parraffin has worked itself out of the rollers. Hopefully that same wax coating will prevent moisture wicking or accumulation. My first hurdle though is getting the PTFE powder through customs. I'm a little concerned about how the authorities will interpret a bag of white powder arriving from a Chinese chemical company. What can possibly go wrong.

  • calfee20
    commented on 's reply
    You know I wonder about the moly powder. It was a huge fad in the accuracy reloading game a few years ago. It has a lot of pros but one con is the moly has an affinity for water. To apply the moly you would tumble the bullets with moly and ball bearings about the size of BB's. If you didn't have stainless BB's they would quickly rust up on you and the micro pits would transfer to the bullets.

    It would be something to keep an eye on anyway.

  • Hard Tail
    commented on 's reply
    Hi Calfee. That looks like a new angle on the same theme. They will have softened the wax to the correct consistancy and the immersed hot water idea is great too. I think the optimum temperature is around 55cel any hotter and the wax drains out when lifted from bath, any colder and it didn't get in, so the water bath should give a good even temp control. There is a chance they may have also added Trflon and Molly powder to the wax. I haven't used this product but it seems like a good way to get the job done.

  • JPLabs
    commented on 's reply
    Rix,

    OK. Your comment 'you don't need to add a thing' meant, to me, you don't even need to thin it, just use straight paraffin wax. That's why I asked.

    Now, I think that's not what you were meant to say. If correct, all is clear again.

    I still think we need to add something to hard wax, to soften it, if it's too flaky to stay on the chain.

  • calfee20
    replied
    Someone suggested this stuff.



    I could not find the post but I did save the link. http://www.runawaybike.com/products/hot-tub

    Has anyone tried it?

    Leave a comment:


  • sieg25
    replied
    Click image for larger version

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ID:	58663 This is like an oil thread but I can't resist. I use this on motorcycle chains. They have repackaged it with different label than my 6 year old can ( still works fine). My can says motorcycle chain lube but they took that off because they want you to use it for many more things. It dries to a wax like film, and will not attract dust. I am going to try home brew thinned paraffin (you tube) just for fun, but I should just use this. I really like the idea of running two chains.

    Last edited by sieg25; 02-23-2018, 11:11 AM.

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  • Rix Ryds
    commented on 's reply
    No experience using either wax or paraffin. I use a 'dry' lubricant I get at Walmart in the bike dept. it is based on wax/paraffin and works well. It's also reasonably priced at about $5 a can. I clean my chain with WD40, Dry it thoroughly, and apply the lube. No chain stretch in 1000's of miles so far. I do this about 4 times a year.

  • Hard Tail
    commented on 's reply
    I reckon your rusty chain delemmas will be a thing of the past. Re the paraffin wax, I'm told you can just use ordinary paraffin candles and mix some paraffin oil when molten. Alternatively I ordered a slab of pure paraffin wax from an atomic candle store. It's already quite greasy and only added about 20% Paraffin oil. Re the ultrasonic cleaner, be careful using lighter fluid. If it's a heater cleaner unit then even household detergents work fine in the ultrasonic unit set to around 60celcius.
    I'm experimenting a bit here too, I'm going to try that green truck wash next time.

  • JPLabs
    commented on 's reply
    When I tried pure canning paraffin, it flaked right off. Very hard, not sticky. Advice I read said to thin it so it can smear instead of flaking and cracking, when gouged with a fingernail. It stays on my chain, after doing that. Thinning to soften it seems like its better, to me, since it leaves the chain coated better. But I'm no tribology expert.

    Thoughts about why pure hard wax is OK, if so?

  • Rix Ryds
    replied
    Don't use wax, use paraffin. You do not need to add a thing, as paraffin has a natural lubricity. It's available in the canning supplies at the grocery store. I would also find a solvent that does not have as low a flash point as lighter fluid. Mineral spirits might be OK. Or diesel fuel. I'd still be cautious of the fire potential. The easy way is to use a wax/paraffin based motorcycle chain lube in a can.

    Leave a comment:


  • eBik
    replied
    I have just ordered two Sram PC850 chains for £5.99 each off amazon.
    And a Clarks anti-rust chain as a spare for £4.50.

    I do not have high hopes for the clarks but want to try using the wax treatment on all these chains.
    My lack of lubricant has really cost me the life of my chains over winter, sometimes the next day the chain is rusty and stiff and I have to free it off with wd40 before riding.
    This must hammer the chain, one mile like that probably causes 100 miles of wear.
    I hope it's not too late for my cassette.

    I am thinking of using barbecue lighter fluid which I picked up in the sales for 10p as the solvent to clean my chain in a £15 ultrasonic cleaner I have had sitting on the shelf for 3 years unused.

    For the wax I will probably buy a load of candles and will have to find something to mix into it.
    I was thinking of using manual gear oil although this stinks bad so might look to some of the suggestions in this thread.

    Leave a comment:

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