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    Converting my old bike to e bike

    I have an old bike - like to convert it to ebike Not sure where to start i.e.
    1. Which is better, front or rear wheel to convert
    2. would like to put the motor in the rear wheel hub - anyone who has done this?

    #2
    I have two front wheel hubs built at this point.. They have been no problem, but a rear hub might be nice to allow the more easy removal of the front wheel to put in the back of my hatchback. With riser bars, I have to remove the stem, but the motor wheels aren't easy just t transport the bike- a rear hub would fit better with the front off and the bars dropped, but I haven't built one up yet, so I don't know if they have any specific problems besides being generally too heavy.



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      #3
      Hi Beatsal. This is a very subjective question. I suspect this may be your first ebike project/ build in which case I further suspect one of your primary influences is availability and cost. From my perspective, a mid drive conversion in most situations would actually be the best solution, however if this is your first ebike experience or build then you may not be comfortable splashing out that kind of cash, in which case Id go the rear wheel option.Front wheel drive just feels all wrong for an experieced ebike but if you’re simply dipping your toe in the ebike world then either a front or rear wheel option will put you on the path of ebike enlightenment. All the best with the project.

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        #4
        Thanks. Based on this, I will go for rear wheel. How to start i.e. get a hub motor and fit it myself or any other option

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          #5
          Mid drives are best and depending on where you get it and what size you get can be a viable option . They are really easy . Front wheel drive is the next easiest that's why there are so many out there . Rear wheel drive you have to make sure the width is right and the cassete you put on is right etc . You can get them all on egay .

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            #6
            Being a newbie, what is a mid drive? I know front and rear but not mid. Pic would help. Thanks

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              #7
              I converted a couple old bikes to mid drive. I'm a retired mechanic so tools and skills are pretty high level.
              https://electricbike.com/forum/forum...-bbshd-project
              https://electricbike.com/forum/forum...-tsdz2-project
              But a rear wheel conversion is much simpler and the drivetrain parts are under their normal stress.
              There are 2 types of hub motors. Direct drive where the motor turn the same speed as the wheel ( basically it IS the wheel). Wheel size will have a direct influence on the speed the bike can run. Generally for slower high torque situations.
              Geared hub motors can be smaller, lighter, faster but not a s good for low speed high load use, and they tend to be noisier.
              The mid drives can have much smaller motors, and due to running through the geartrain a wider range of speeds. But in the higher powered versions they can chew up chains and cogs frequently.
              I would avoid a front drive. It won't climb well, wheel slip and side loading when turned can cause handling problems, and bicycle forks and headsets weren't designed for driving loads. Those are 2 parts you don't want to have problems with,
              Last edited by Retrorockit; 06-01-2019, 07:40 AM.

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                #8
                Originally posted by beatsal View Post
                Being a newbie, what is a mid drive? I know front and rear but not mid. Pic would help. Thanks
                Here's a picture of a Bafang BBS02 motor, and is typical of the type of mid-drive motor that can be installed onto standard bike frames:


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                There are some instances where this type of motor cannot be installed. There are also some types of bicycles that are poor choices for conversion (such as ultra-light race bikes). If you'd like assistance with determining your bike's suitability, please post some pictures of the bike, especially near/around what's called the "bottom bracket" (the area of the frame around the pedals).
                Click image for larger version

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                Complete mid-drive motor kits (motor, wiring, controls and high quality battery) cost approx. $1,200-$1,400 U.S. Installation requires a few specialized bicycle tools and/or a few hours from a local bicycle repair shop.
                Last edited by ncmired; 06-01-2019, 09:06 AM.
                BBSHD / BBS02 IGH Builds: Nexus / Alfine 8: 1 2 3 4 5 6, Rohloff: 1

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                  #9
                  1 PIC attached. Please comment. Thanks
                  Attached Files

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                    #10
                    I'm guessing that's an older, mid-range Raleigh steel framed, 18 (maybe 21) speed, 26 inch wheels and flat bar (mountain or hybrid) bike. Or something like this.

                    Here's some mid drive thoughts.

                    Good things:
                    1. Steel frame
                    2. Standard, English bottom bracket, hopefully 68mm (or 2 11/16") wide - need to be measured
                    3. Lots of chain stay clearance
                    Problem areas:
                    1. Open, under the frame shifter cables - front doesn't matter, as the front derailler would be removed. The rear derailler shift cable would most likely need to be either a.) sheathed in a full casing, or b.) routed over the top of the bottom bracket tube and routed through a clamp-on cable guide
                    2. The water bottle mount bosses (often used for the battery) are very low and could cause a clearance issue, depending on the battery used - solvable several ways.
                    3. Probably needs a new chain and rear sprocket set
                    An aftermarket, pre-built 26" hub drive motor kit may be a good fit here as well. If you don't have bicycle-specific tools, a rear wheel conversion would be easier to accomplish with basic tools, and cost hundreds less than a mid drive.
                    Last edited by ncmired; 06-03-2019, 05:31 PM.
                    BBSHD / BBS02 IGH Builds: Nexus / Alfine 8: 1 2 3 4 5 6, Rohloff: 1

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                      #11
                      I would say for that bike a hub motor that can be moved on to another bike later. I expect that bike has rim brakes and no way to add discs. A direct drive hub motor will probably go as fast as you want to go on that bike. An MTB with suspension fork and disc brakes is a better place to start for a mid drive since they can go up to and beyond 30mph. Even then you don't want one of the Walmart bikes. Probably Ok up to 20mph or so. I started with a pretty good Gary Fisher bike, and when I added a BSHD I had to upgrade the disc brakes, suspension, and Rims from what it came with to have something that felt good at that speed. You don't show the rims in the photo. But from the other components I see i don't expect much. If the rims are steel don't use them, if they're not at least double wall aluminum same thing. If you remove a tire and look behind the rim strip if you see the nipples right there it's no good, If you see holes and the nipples are down in the holes then it's proabaly useable. It doesn't look like a bad frame, but they use different compnonents at different price points on the same frames so it's hard to tell what you actually have. 26" MTB wheels are easy to find. You might have to upgrade the rim brake to fit. I would get the front wheel and brake up to speed before I put a motor on it. Maybe even a solid MTB fork if needed.

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                        #12
                        They are really easy. Front wheel drive is the next easiest that's why there are so many out there. Rear wheel drive you have to make sure the width is right and the cassette you put on is right etc. vidmate

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                          #13
                          You can simply convert your bike into an electric bike. Follow the video below.





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                            #14
                            I had a project to make my old bike fun by putting in it an engine. I can easily accelerate on my new motorized bike! This upgrade has helped me get around the city without any worries. The motor must be slotted and fastened to the frame, install the new motor chain on the bike. Place an elastic bushing on either side of the bicycle tire, behind the screws, attach a steel washer. Install the drive chain into the system, using the bracket to attach the motor to the frame. Screw the engine into place and screw the spark plug and mount the clutch near the left handlebar, you will have to remove the left handbrake and insert the other end into the engine bar. Take out the screwdriver and slowly tighten the wire Install the accelerator on the right side of the handle. Connect the fuel tank to the carburetor using the hose in the engine kit. Using the bolts included in the bike kit, attach the silencer to the exhaust.
                            Last edited by Robert07; 03-23-2022, 09:19 AM.

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