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    #16
    LMAO!!! I never even saw the part about riding on trails.......to us "cruisers", thats sacrilegious!!! LOL. But in all honesty, no cruiser frame should be used for MTB. Get the right bike for the right application. And I tell everyone only use drum brakes if you are staying on the streets. They WILL stop you better than the old "pinchers", but nothing near what a good set of hydraulic disc brakes will do. I am not even sure a 12 year old is allowed to use motors unless it is on private land, so why even look at cruisers, stay with the MTBs. And yes Ruff uses disc brakes, they also use Bosch(blahhhsh) motor, and Nuvinci or Roloff hub with gates carbon belts, along with those springer forks. ALL of which I think are a waste of $/ Junk/ or just not needed. So just to make you smile, I AGREE 100% with ya Retrorocket. I was just rubbing in the cruiser side of the post;) No Offense ment

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      #17
      Real Americans ride what they want. But my riding is urban South FL. I want hardware that works, and performs well and reliably. I'm missing 6" of my rear fender because 1500W was just enough to get me out of the way of a pickup truck that decided to suddenly back up down the street for no apparent reason. My policy of crossing 6' behind stopped vehicles is now 10'.At least his backup lights were working. In FL there are a lot of lightly used 10 year old MTB around with solid engineering for not much money. If someone wants to post something constructive about converting a cruiser that's nice. But they could save the flames for their tire treads where they might do some good ;). I have 0 hub motor expeience. The info. on that was welcome since sand is a fact of life in FL ,and my BBSHD is too nose heavy for it. My advice for cable brakes is based on the fact that pistons can pop out in transit with a wheel removed, or trail side during a flat repair. The BB7s may be old school, but with sintered pads they were DH rated parts. This means they can handle the speed and weight of an E bike. My guest bike has a Shimano Roller brake on the rear. Works well to stop the bike, but can catch fire on long downhill runs! Also just like hydraulics BB7s don't need constant adjustment with the harder pads. FWIW they say don't run the sintered pads on Avid Juicy brakes because it can boil the fluid. I already had the BB7s and looked at hydraulics. Didn't see any real advantage. if you find an old MTB with BB7s it was fairly high end back in the day.Very good chance there will be a decent fork and wheelset there also.
      Last edited by Retrorockit; 1 week ago.

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