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Greetings from Athens, GA

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    Greetings from Athens, GA

    Hello from Athens, Georgia, this is Dean. I'm building a fatbike commuter / playbike with a BBSHD and a 52V, 24ah Panosonic GA triangle battery & charger, all from Luna Cycle. This is my first electric vehicle, but I have a fair amount of experience with motorcycles and cars.

    The donor bike is a Gravity Bullseye 27.5", $500. Getting the BBSHD into the bottom bracket was a struggle. I used emery cloth to take the paint off the BBSHD and smooth the inside of the hole. It was still a very tight fit. It needed a 2mm spacer to clear the chainstay.

    All the other parts went on smoothly, and the battery will arrive next week. I still need to wore in the Luna headlight and taillight, but I'm reading about that now.

    One question I have is about the base programming on the controller. I have a C965 dash. I get the basic idea of pedal assist levels, but I wonder if the throttle operates independently from the PAS? So if I set the PAS to zero, and get the bike moving, will the throttle provide all the power available from the battery?

    Any other tips are appreciated, thanks,
    Dean

    #2
    Welcome to the forum Dean. I have the colour screen and the throttle works indipendant to the pass. Still works even on pass 0 or 1. Yes I get full power.

    Comment


      #3
      Thanks Rodney.

      How sensitive are these bikes to rain? I am thinking about biyng a front fender.

      Comment


      • JPLabs
        JPLabs commented
        Editing a comment
        One thing to consider is that the triangle bags can fill with water. The Zip Tie version, especially - the side pockets are funnels for rain which then soaks into the bag itself! I used a hot metal rod to put a hole in the bottom of my bag, so any water which gets in can get out. And I used a pocket knife to punch small slits into each side pocket so they won't be such good funnels. Now that bag works fine, my bike got rained on last night and the bag didn't get wet inside.

        The Velcro bag is less susceptible to water, but not as nice looking, IMO.

        Any time I get stuck in rain, I take my pack out of the bag and let everything dry out. Good practice.

      #4
      The motors actually very well protected. All the plugs are they say are water proof. Batterys more important to keep dry. A fenders good even to keep you dry. Looking forward to hearing your ride report.

      Comment


        #5
        I have a 52V BBSHD, and what I like to do is when the light turns green, I use the thumb throttle to get going, then I start pedaling in PAS mode, power assist level-5. Since I live where its fairly flat, I almost always leave my gear-shift (7-sp derailleur) in the top gear. When I'm riding with my grandson, I shift to the lowest gear so I can use full throttle and still just go a modest speed.

        For water-proofing, buy the smallest tube you can find of silicone di-electric grease from an auto parts store, and pack the pins and sockets of the XT90-S connectors (and any other electric connector).

        If its possible, could you please turn your bike over and get a good pic of the BB and the parts where the motor case almost hit the chainstays? Lots of new people are wondering what bikes work for this kit, and how troublesome or easy it might be...

        Comment


        • JPLabs
          JPLabs commented
          Editing a comment
          That seems like a good tip for the 'simple tips' thread. I haven't put dielectric in my connectors. Guess I should.

        #6
        Thanks, that's encouraging. I will definitely squirt some dielectric grease in all the connectors, great idea.

        Here's the clearance for my 2015 Gravity Bullseye 27.5 bike, 18" frame. I used a single 2mm spacer.

        Thanks,
        Dean

        Comment


          #7
          Hello from another Georgia Newbie, I haven't found anybody here in S.E. Ga that has a clue about electric bikes. I'm curious what kind of feedback you get on the street on your ebike in College town?

          Comment


            #8
            Just got it on the road, I'll let you know in a few weeks. Athens is not a great bicycle town, despite the students and Twilight races.

            Comment


              #9
              My daughter lives there, it's a town where everyone always seems to be in a hurry.

              Comment


                #10
                No e-bikes in Augusta either. Only a few fat-bikes. Very few. Try to ride under the radar as far as motor concerned. They are so busy gawking at tires, they don't notice the motor.

                Comment


                  #11
                  Well it's been a few weeks of commuting, and I've made a few changes, but overall I really enjoy it.

                  I mounted some slick tires which made the ride a bit rougher, but a good bit faster.

                  The lowest rear cog took some abuse and now won't hold the chain under power. After some reading I hunted down a Sturmey-Archer 3 speed IGH, and it's being laced to a 80mm rim now. I hope that the 133% top gear will take the power of the BBSHD.

                  The Athens traffic has been OK, although when the students return next week I may change my tune. The bike goes 35 on flat ground with no trouble, and I go from 80% to 50% each way on the commute. The 24Ah GA battery is a beast. The BBSHD is hot to the touch when I arrive, but hasn't complained yet.

                  I got caught in my first heavy downpour, and it ran fine. The battery was damp, and the traingle bag dried out quickly when empty. The Tektro brakes were basically useless in the rain though, so I'm reading up on fixes. Is this normal for wet disc brakes?


                  Thanks,
                  Dean

                  Comment


                    #12
                    Since you have the "zip tie" bag, with grommet holes, please make a "rain coat" that wraps over everything, and laces up on the bottom (or velcro's) Even a small amount of rain can fry everything.

                    Comment


                      #13
                      YIkes, that's scary. Would I be better off with the velcro strap version of this bag? Would that need a raincoat? thanks, Dean

                      Comment


                        #14
                        It's hard to say, but the velcro bag definitely has fewer ways for moisture to get in. I'd stick with the bag you have now, and add something that provides an extra layer of protection...

                        Comment


                          #15
                          Raincoat is the ultimate solution, but I think not necessary, if you take some other precautions and don't ride when it is expected to rain.

                          To lower the risk of water accumulating in a triangle bag:
                          • Melt a drain hole in the bottom of any triangle bag to make SURE water won't accumulate. Just heat a nail or something and poke it through at the lowest point.
                          • For the Zip-tie bag, also put small drain holes in the side pockets so they won't be funnels into the bag.
                          • Put dabs of sealant at the zip tie holes.
                          • If you do get rained on, take the pack out of the bag let it dry out for a day or so in a warm, not hot, place.
                          • Go around the zipper stitching with medium viscosity superglue. This strengthens the seams and seals them.
                          • Store the bike with the bag partly unzipped so it can breathe to release any moisture

                          Last edited by JPLabs; 08-05-2016, 07:56 AM.
                          Fabrication is fun! Build something today. Show someone. Let them help. Inspire and share. Spread the desire.

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