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Chain coming off (for the millionth time probably)

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    #31
    Now is when you find out she has a secret you tube channel where she goes to the skate and mountain bike parks and rides like Sam Pilgrim.

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    • Hunda67
      Hunda67 commented
      Editing a comment
      LOL - who knows maybe that is it :-)

    #32
    I wouldn't overthink this, if nothing is mechanically wrong, and she's dropping chains, get some sort of chainguide on there and then forget about it.

    You don't have to be on a mountain bike ripping rough terrain at speed to need a chainguide, as mountain bikes have suspension, and even cheap mountain bike derailleurs have clutches to reduce how much the chain bounces around. Both of those things are quite effective. I ride mountain bikes, and also have an e-cargo bike for around town, and it was more common for me to drop the chain on the e-cargo bike than mountain bike, when neither had a chainguide.

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      #33
      I agree that is what I shall probably do. It's just annoying that a brand new bike needs modified in order to use it as intended.

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        #34
        Guess you could always try to strap a go-pro to the bike - looking down at the chain. It's possible some eagle-eyed members here could spot a problem. Or if nothing else, possibly a slow-mo replay could spot the first instance where things get messed up and help with troubleshooting.

        One other possibility occurred to me as someone mentioned clothing above. Not so much that specifically - but I know my 'natural' foot position has my heel pointed in slightly - to the point it sometimes brushes the frame. Any possibility you wife has an excessive 'heel in' stance, too? Possibly the very edge of a shoe is clipping the chain and knocking it off? Maybe a 'sneaker check' to look for signs of chain grease on the inside heel area?

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          #35
          1-2mm bend in the chain ring is plenty enough to throw chains if it's abrupt - if it's gentle it's not so likely to be an issue

          FWIW I've seen more than a couple of new bikes that had a tendency to drop chains, even some with expensive derailleurs... but everyone was fixable one way or another and I'm convinced the first place to start is narrow-wide... I've got one bike with a high-end clutch derailleur, skinny chain (11sp) and good chain line that would drop them not terribly often with skinny tooth rings, just every few rides, and *never* happens on narrow-wides (many 1000's of miles).

          I've got another bike with a cheap 7sp derailleur that unlike the other bike, even completely new out of the box, would drop chains annoyingly often, every ride or two. It would usually happen when shifting rapidly. It had a not terribly good chain line, narrow tooth ring and would always drop on the same side and way too often get hung up in the cadence sensor. Fabricating a guide helped a lot bought had it's own share of issues and I would still get that very seldom drop but it was a pain getting the chain back on since guides not only block the chain from coming off they also block it from going back on. Narrow-wide and modified guards on both sides of the ring and never again had one drop - added benefit since it's mostly a loaner is the guard goes a very long way to keeping pant legs out of the chain.

          And rider technique sounds like BS to me... you should be able to ride downright abusively and not throw chains, pedaling under tension (bad idea for other reasons), fast shifts (ideally shouldn't be an issue but if things are less than optimal can lead to drops), etc. although I would see if I could correlate the chain drops to any riding behaviors

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          • Retrorockit
            Retrorockit commented
            Editing a comment
            Narrow/wide is pretty much what makes 1x drivetrains possible. Chain guides are old school when N/W isn't an option.They both work.

          #36
          I'm adding these comments on chain retention from another currently running thread that touches on some elements I've discovered on these ebikes. I am running a Luna Eclipse narrow/wide 42T chainring in this case. Some of this won't apply to OP's issues, but it speaks a bit to chain retention.

          Retro, on your DH rated derailleur comment, I was under the impression when I started this emtb journey that I would require a clutched derailleur and much heavier duty drivetrain components all around. On my SC Nomad/BBSHD I installed a 9-speed Box 3 whole setup...11-50 all steel cassette, clutched derailleur, trigger shifter, and chain. Last month I destroyed the derailleur...just from use/abuse, no impacts. Wanting to continue riding until I ordered a replacement I installed my old, previous, Shimano, 9-speed steel, 11-34 cassette, long cage SRAM X-7 rear derailleur, and X-7 trigger shifter. Before ordering new parts I thought I'd give this setup a try. On the very first ride I was impressed with the increased smoothness over the previous drivetrain. I also discovered that I really didn't need 11-50 gears. On our roughest, rocky climbs, the 11-34 was more than adequate, and when going to the 34T I could crawl over obstacles with ease and control. I never used the 50T on the Box cassette, and I don't think I even used the next cog that was 44T or 46T. I couldn't go slow enough to use the 50T. It was practically unusable for me.

          Next, on the lack of a clutch derailleur, I haven't dropped the chain even once on fast, rocky descents. This suprised me a bit. My used X-7 stuff is working perfectly. I'm a decent MTB'er and even with the back end of the bike...6.5" on my Nomad...hammering through rocks, jumps, and V-dips, the chain stays in place without even a bunch of racket back there. And my chain is longer than I'd normally run it because I didn't want to shorten it, thinking I'd go back to the 11-50 setup. So my chain nearly touches the derailleur when in the 11T. This is often bad juju for chain flail in rough terrain. I am surprised. I will not be going back to a clutched derailleur or massively low gears. I just don't need them. And, I'm not lugging the motor in a high gear abusive manner running this 11-34 cassette. Now...this chain and derailleur control may be an issue on other rear suspension designs that have more radical axle paths that work the chain like a rubber band. The VPP on SC bikes is kind of known for being easy on this issue.

          I'm retired from my past career and only work part time hours at a bike shop so I get to ride a lot...sometimes 3 days in a row and usually at least every other day. I'm learning more and more about the BBSHD and how it works as an emtb conversion. Right now I couldn't be happier.

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          • Retrorockit
            Retrorockit commented
            Editing a comment
            My bike is a mid 2000s 8 speed. No clutch or other special setup. Just a shorter cage MTB derailer. I'm also running a 50t ring, so 40T is not that low for me. Someone else will need to give him advice on newer stuff. This is a fast 26" street bike.
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