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Need help on 36v scooter

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    #16
    Yes, as I mentioned before, it all checks out with the exception of being able to measure amps, as it resets. Always 40.8v. If + to + and - to -, then yes polarity checks out.
    by the way, I solved the 12 V scooter power problem, for about 30 seconds, LOL.
    https://electricbike.com/forum/forum...oller-question

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      #17
      12Volt controller...RIP.

      I was asking about the charger amp draw while powering up the light...

      On the BMS, did you say if all three main wires (charger and battery connector grounds, and battery negative connection) have continuity thru the board? (which would be normal)

      See my completed Magic Pie V5 rear hub motor E-Bike build HERE.

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        #18

        Wondering if there’s a way to use the original 12v controller. You mentioned a pot. Why not hook one into the current throttle mechanism?

        Yes, the charger immediately blows some kind of fuse everytime I use the amp meter. Shuts off for a few seconds, then resets. Not enough time to get an amp reading.
        ill order a new charger.
        I ordered a new BMS as well. They only sell 11 wire plugs now, so I’ll have to solder it up correct order.

        There is continuity between all 3 grounds.
        Last edited by TheNiceGuy; 02-10-2019, 10:44 AM.

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        • Tommycat
          Tommycat commented
          Editing a comment
          Would to need to know how the original controller works... there are throttles made that use pots now for operation. But at an electronics voltage/amperage level.
          Please take no offence... but are you putting the meter leads in series with the power leg of the charger to measure amperage, or current?

        #19
        The old 12v controller looks much simpler and robust. I don’t know what I’m doing in electronics at all, and even so could figure out that the throttle is just a button that closes the circuit, the brake stop also closes a circuit, and that’s it. Since the controller was damaged, I’m not sure it does anything at all now other than act as a relay for these two features. It would be nice if there’s a way to transfer the HALL feature aspects of the new controller over onto this one, thus getting the best of both worlds.

        I hope I’m doing the amp measuring properly. I put the positive probe on the positive wire and the negative on the negative. The probe wires heat up if there’s high current, but it warns about this on the tester to do X seconds at X amps maximum.
        Last edited by TheNiceGuy; 02-10-2019, 12:06 PM.

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          #20

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            #21
            Originally posted by TheNiceGuy View Post
            I hope I’m doing the amp measuring properly. I put the positive probe on the positive wire and the negative on the negative. The probe wires heat up if there’s high current, but it warns about this on the tester to do X seconds at X amps maximum.
            Nope, In SERIES with one wire only, before or after the load using DC amps and the correct meter jacks/setting... as in

            Click image for larger version

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            Perhaps a 500 watt 12 volt controller with ignition lock> :-)
            See my completed Magic Pie V5 rear hub motor E-Bike build HERE.

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              #22

              Ok, I tested the lightbulb set up that way, and it only reads 0.2 A. How in the world is it able to light it up and make it hot with such a low amperage?
              i also hooked it up to the charger/battery, and got only -0.3amps as a peak while the charger gives the error signal.
              Last edited by TheNiceGuy; 02-10-2019, 02:22 PM.

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                #23
                I obtained a new 42v 2a charger. It outputs 41.8v. Hooking it up to the battery for a few minutes , it maintained a steady 0.45 A. The battery is 38.0v. Isn’t this current low?
                Given the close values, it would tend to indicate my original charger is fine?
                it’s a different brand of charger, so apparently it does not give an error signal (like my original charger) , only solid red or green. Additionally, my original charger is rated for 1.8 A, which would perhaps explain the small difference?

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                  #24
                  You would have to look closely at the charger's specs. As some output less than in the descriptions... But .45 A would seem low unless the battery is getting close to fully charged (within a couple volts) where the amperage will start to taper off. As an example my charger will charge at full amperage capacity (52 volt nominal 58.8 output @ 2.5 amps Luna Mini) till the voltage reaches 56.7 volts where it will start to reduce. 1.94 amps @ 56.9 volts...1 amp @ 57.3 volts, .46 amps @ 58 volts...

                  When you where incorrectly checking for amperage earlier, you would in effect be directly shorting the charger and battery, if it was hooked up, several times thru your meter. For this reason I would be very suspicious of what that meter is telling you now. And would want to verify the readings with another meter

                  Did you change the BMS?. Or was the resetting caused by the amperage testing?

                  Your original charger was still not putting out the full voltage required for a full charge and balance. That said, some like myself purposely charge to a lower value to extend the battery's life. Charging to 100% only when necessary.
                  See my completed Magic Pie V5 rear hub motor E-Bike build HERE.

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                    #25
                    Thanks for the heads up on the multimeter TC. I checked it against known values at AC 110 V and DC 3.7 V, and the amp readings were about perfect. Perhaps the multimeter survived OK.
                    i’m still waiting on delivery of the BMS and hall sensors. The charger resetting was due to my incorrect testing with the multimeter.
                    I would have thought we’d see zero current with a bad BMS? It does seem way to low though. There’s also what appears to be the error signal led. I’ll try leaving it plugged in anyway for an hour, and see if the battery level goes up.

                    edit: well, after some wincing and avoiding explosion distance, it looks like all is well. It charged to 41v. I guess the strobe and whine just means it’s charging.
                    So needless BMS coming, and only 1 hall sensor required to get everything running.
                    Last edited by TheNiceGuy; 02-18-2019, 07:50 AM.

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                      #26
                      Ok!
                      hall sensors finally arrived today (over 2 months in shipping), replaced suspect sensor (man! What a fiddley job), and motor spins up!
                      Got everything together and it runs great! Wife thinks it’s a blast too. Only bad thing is the throttle is dead and for like first 70% then tries to cram everything in, so very jumpy touchy throttle.
                      Last edited by TheNiceGuy; 03-05-2019, 08:32 AM.

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                        #27
                        Yikes! 70% dead band at the start? Sounds like deja vu all over again! :-) Back to verifying the throttle input/output. Jumpy/irratic sounds like a poor connection or solder joint. Amperage draw on the motor with-in specs? (double checking to see if the hall sensor order to phases are correct).
                        See my completed Magic Pie V5 rear hub motor E-Bike build HERE.

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                          #28
                          Hey TC!
                          Ill have to go back and review all the old tests we did, and see if I can remember the terminology correctly. This one is a brushless setup this time, with nicer more complex throttle unit. Power output feels about right, and whatever the issue is, it’s consistent (no variations etc).
                          Motor phase wire combination, or hub motor hall sensors issues would not cause this? Also, “self learning” wires not involved?
                          throttle caseing Is proving to be difficult to take apart without breaking.
                          Last edited by TheNiceGuy; 03-06-2019, 08:06 AM.

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                            #29

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                              #30
                              If you peek in and see the board designations it may help. LED power display on throttle? Switch for some thing? Hall sensor? Looks like nice heavy wiring.

                              Self learning wires after use should be disconnected. IE. After the phase to hall operations are correctly programmed.(learned)
                              See my completed Magic Pie V5 rear hub motor E-Bike build HERE.

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