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    #16
    Originally posted by Tommycat View Post

    My recommendation would be to disconnect everything from the controller, that uses this 5vdc controller power,(including wiring harnesses) to see if some external problem is shorting it out. So disconnecting everything except for the battery and display, then seeing if the 5vdc comes back with all other components removed from the equation.
    I've done this..no luck

    I rana few more tests..

    1) As per this PDF, I'm metering the hall between the black and red wires of the hall 5 wire bundle exiting the controller. This is where I'm getting a 0v reading. That said, between either the black or red wires and each of the three other wires, I do get readings (6 different ones depending on the wire combo), all between 1.5-2.25v. Odd..
    This is with the hall bundle exiting the motor connected and disconnected (same results either way). Also, the voltage did not oscillate between 0v and 5v like it was supposed to as per the test.
    2) I tested all possible combinations of the three wires exiting the controller and going to the throttle. Red to black: 0v, Red to blue: .46v, and Black to blue: .49v. This is with the throttle attached and the bike on. The position of the throttle didn't change the readings.
    3) I did the same for the PAS; I tested all possible combinations of the three wires exiting the controller and going to the PAS. Red to black: 1.69v, Red to yellow: .66v and finally Black to yellow: 1v

    I guess at this point I should just get a new controller?

    Comment


      #17
      Originally posted by Marc123 View Post

      I've done this..no luck



      I guess at this point I should just get a new controller?
      I agree with your assessment that a new controller is required. :-( As I mentioned earlier, make certain that your motor wiring and hall sensor operation are correct before replacement.


      Consider this...

      I recently repaired a hoverboard that had a broken motor mount that allowed the motor axle to spin in the housing. (much like your cable wrap around the axle.) It was obvious that the wires had been twisted inside their protective insulation and thru the axle. But it wasn't known until removal of the wiring the extent of the damage to the wiring from nics, and cuts that resulted from just being twisted. It had also pulled one of the hall sensor wires from it's PCB board. All easily repaired with correct wire. But if left as it was... a recipe for shorting and more problems down the road. With your description of a motor drop-out, I would be compelled to inspect all of the wires involved...

      With the motor isolated from the controller, I would add to the previous checks of resistance between phases ( < 2 ohms) to check between each phase and ground. (no resistance) and each phase and each wire of the hall sensor bundle for no resistance.
      Also check for resistance when turning your wheel. When disconnected from each other no resistance should be noted until connecting 2 of the phase wires. Check all three combinations, as they should all produce the same resistance effect.

      Then take the time to do the hall sensor check I referenced previously. You will need a 5vdc source, and 10 k resistors. Bit of a hassle, but valuable troubleshooting experience and may expose issues.
      The jest is to put 5vdc and ground to the correct points of the hall sensor.(see pin-out in data sheet below) Then put the resistor between the 5vdc + and the output of the sensor. This simulates the controller's electronic input. Then test for the voltage latching and unlatching when your rotate the wheel.

      https://sensing.honeywell.com/honeyw...12814-b-en.pdf

      Of course you will want to use your existing wiring... just for reference.








      See my completed Magic Pie V5 rear hub motor E-Bike build HERE.

      Comment


        #18
        *update* The new controller arrived today, and the bike works, although only via the PAS. The throttle is getting its standard 5V, but won't cause the motor to accelerate as it should. Any ideas?

        Comment


          #19
          I'd check the throttle output. If not .8 to 4.2 (off to WOT)... perhaps incorrectly wired or bad hall sensor.

          Check out this thread for details on how to find out. :-)

          https://electricbike.com/forum/forum...d-modification
          See my completed Magic Pie V5 rear hub motor E-Bike build HERE.

          Comment


            #20
            Originally posted by Tommycat View Post
            I'd check the throttle output. If not .8 to 4.2 (off to WOT)... perhaps incorrectly wired or bad hall sensor.

            Check out this thread for details on how to find out. :-)

            https://electricbike.com/forum/forum...d-modification
            The output is 0V, so the hall sensor looks to be fried. I tested the system by giving the signal wire 1.5v from a battery, and sure enough the wheel spun!
            I think I'll try making my own throttle using a graphite potentiometer..

            Comment


              #21
              Nice job on the system check!

              Just a reminder on the potentiometer throttle. You may have to add resistors on each side to have it "act " or output voltages like a hall sensor type... As the controller may lock-out or at the least give unwanted dead zone(s) before start and after hitting maximum operation of the motor. As it looks for particular inputs associated with hall sensor out-puts. Unless your new controller is programmable...
              See my completed Magic Pie V5 rear hub motor E-Bike build HERE.

              Comment


              • ncrkd
                ncrkd commented
                Editing a comment
                Hi Tommycat - regarding throttles, any ideas for a "motor on" momentary push button switch circuit (adjustable full or partial throttle) that disconnects when the brake switch is applied (one brake side would be good enough)?

              • Tommycat
                Tommycat commented
                Editing a comment
                Hi ncrkd,

                From your description it sounds like you could be looking for something like this...

                http://www.ebikessf.com/clyte-cruise-ctrl

                That should give you your Ticket to ride down the Long and winding road and Here there and everywhere... OK, who has the Beatle's tunes cranked up so loud???


                Marc123, Turn that throttle down!!! ;-)

              • ncrkd
                ncrkd commented
                Editing a comment
                Hey thanks - that, and a short main harness extension cable to splice into will probably do the trick and get me to the crossroads (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MF5fQXVZGug)!

                Here's hoping Marc123 goes for an eleven knob
                Last edited by ncrkd; 08-11-2019, 02:18 PM.

              #22
              Originally posted by Tommycat View Post
              Nice job on the system check!

              Just a reminder on the potentiometer throttle. You may have to add resistors on each side to have it "act " or output voltages like a hall sensor type... As the controller may lock-out or at the least give unwanted dead zone(s) before start and after hitting maximum operation of the motor. As it looks for particular inputs associated with hall sensor out-puts. Unless your new controller is programmable...
              So I ended up using the potentiometer from the +/- volume wheel of an old clock radio to make myself a new throttle. Not the safest thing in the world, but it allows for cruise control haha.

              Comment

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