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  • tklop
    commented on 's reply
    Dang. At the price, I'd have expected a lot more. Sorry to hear that, JPLabs.

  • JPLabs
    commented on 's reply
    My B&M IQx-e has died already. Lasted about 30 rides. Sheesh. It did run hot. Adding polarizers on the front, as I did, reduces cooling to some extent, so I'll take the blame, but it was cool weather, too. I'm not impressed.

  • treolan
    replied
    My bike has a X1 Stvzo and I'm very pleased with its performance.

    Leave a comment:


  • tklop
    commented on 's reply
    Each of their lights do seem to have their own beam-patterns.

    I kind-of wish I'd been able to be out there testing with your group! It's hard to really get a solid grasp, I suppose, with words alone.

    I think eventually I'll try to get video of my Luxos U in varying conditions of weather and terrain, and stick it up on YouTube to show what that model does.

    Thanks for the reply, JPLabs

  • JPLabs
    commented on 's reply
    If you mean the outer square corners of the forward pattern, which are wide and do swing into turns, yes, mine has them. Fine for roads, but on tight singletrack, they leave me turning into dark. Unless I aim the light extra high, then it's pretty good, but really blinding.

    I still use an open LED type flashlight on my bars, sometimes, to see in the dark on tight trails.

    My B&M light is at handlrbar height. Aiming horizontal is not sufficient to see these tightest of turns, it needs to aim upwards, to flood the foreground, 10 feet high, or so, then it's ok.

  • tklop
    commented on 's reply
    I've got some (crappy-ass) "action-cam" vids of riding at night with my Luxos U. It's a shame everything winds up looking so much darker on video--it's very hard to get an accurate impression. What I wish I could show, is how the beam is shaped, how it works through the turns, etc.

    The B&M website has some really nice (and optically accurate) images of the beam-patterns of their various lights. They're not BS--that's exactly what you get.

    But those are stills--and they don't really tell the full story--they don't show the full advantages of their beam-patterns.

    I've found my Luxos U is outstanding--for roads, curves--even off-road.

    The headlight is essentially a focused-beam, but its reflector and multiple LED arrays allow each beam-segment--each pool of light to be diffused--whenever aimed at anything beyond it's focal point. That's a huge advantage in terms of not blinding others--but also, it allows really cool effects of light-beam geometry--like when turning.

    While riding straight, I've got decent visibility to either side--which for me is quite helpful riding where there's potential animals running around (wild or domestic). This also helps prevent the "tunnel-vision" one can get with too narrow a beam. But though they're nowhere in the "main beam-pattern" at all--as soon as I begin to lean into a turn, a very handy extra rectangular pool of light hits the road (or trail), to the turn-side of the main headlight beam, filling it all in nicely.

    I've mentioned it before--but it's really nice--so I'll repeat it again: I never turn into darkness anymore!

    The side of the headlight on the outside of the turn is of course producing this same beam, but it diffuses beyond its focal-point--so it's not even blinding the birds.

    As you described, the abruptness of that beam-edge took me some getting used to. My night-vision had to adapt. But now, I actually really enjoy it--even off-road at night.

    Yes--it throws one hell of a lot of light on the ground--but very little upward. The beam is so efficient, that it won't help much with things like street-signs (actually a little annoying at times). The headlight just isn't wasting its energy shining "up there". But what that also means, is that there's almost no "glare-back"----not even as much as you'd get in a car from your own headlights. Because of this, I've found my night-vision actually remains useful, in spite of the full illumination of my path. I just needed to learn to relax (and allow myself to stop squinting).

    I also understand what you mean--how it'd be cool if you could switch on and off each LED array--for various lighting conditions. Let us figure our for ourselves what combinations work best for fog, rain, daytime-visibility, night-rural, night-city, night-off-road, --etc. I agree that'd really be ideal.

    On the other hand, I also understand that these darn things were certainly made to meed the German market's traffic-regulations--and that the manufacturer might not want their customers to select any modes that might not meet those strict standards...

    I can accept that, I guess--but I'm with you: Want me happiest? Just let me configure...

    For my city-bike, I mounted the light high (bracket give-or-take 100 centemeters above the roadway)--mounted it right at my gooseneck--and I've found it's pretty much ideal. That height means I don't have problems with shadows even if I venture off-road.

    For my Brompton folding-bike, it's just above the front fender (tiny wheels). Very close to the ground.

    The disadvatage of the lower-mounting on the Brompton, is that the beam-angle to roadway is much lower, meaning if I am cresting a rise (or traversing a speed-bump), I can potentially zap oncoming traffic with the full 90 Lux. Obviously, the "non-blinding" characteristics are much improved with higher mounting (if possible--it's not with the Brompton).

    So I'm happy as can be with both my Luxos U installations.

    But I wondered if your IQx-e also had that really nice cornering beam-pattern.
    Last edited by tklop; 06-19-2019, 11:45 AM.

  • JPLabs
    commented on 's reply
    Thanks, Tklop. For these more obscure lights, I figure it will be some of the only info to be found, so wanted to try to confirm it's pretty darn nice, with some limitations and possibilities.

    Appreciate the note.

  • Retrorockit
    replied
    The low power draw of modern LED lights may make the fficiency question more or less moot between battery power, and Dynamo hub.

    Leave a comment:


  • tklop
    commented on 's reply
    I'm following this--and find your review and experience quite helpful!

    I just wanted to tell you that--in case you thought you might just be posting to yourself over here...

    All the best, JPLabs!

    Tklop

  • JPLabs
    commented on 's reply
    Follow-up:

    That bracket worked great. The pattern is as good as described, I think, it's a clearly defined zone with sharp edges. It's not overly bright in foreground, can carry a LONG ways, and it's won all the 'who has least glare' tests with my riding buddies. A few of those other lights are various Nightrider lights. Not sure which, but I had more light on the paved path we were on, and less glare, for sure.

    It's still plenty bright to be seen, but not painfully blinding, in night mode. In day mode at night (achieved by aiming a light at photo sensor) it is a good light level, but the conspicuity lights are REALLY bright to onlookers compared to the main beam in day mode, so I put tape on those for the testing DAY mode at night, and the lower main beam level was a lot more pleasant to use.

    There's a very sharp, horizontal cutoff so it's not ideal for off road and hilly, curvy areas with normal aim, but aiming up just a bit for trails works pretty well. The bracket lends itself to easy adjustment while riding, as long as screws aren't too tight. Stem accessory bracket is plastic but is stiff enough to let you aim pretty precisely on first try, not too springy, but a stiffer one would be even better.

    It's plenty bright for everyplace I've used it. It's way brighter than needed for off-road night use at lower speeds, unless you don't care about night vision, so I carry a 2nd light with low levels and open pattern, too. To fill in a moonlight trail's shadows without blinding me, for instance.

    The DAY mode would be much better for such use, it's dimmer for the main beam. This is auto switched with a photosensor, but I would rather have a manual switch so i can back off sometimes at night, too.

    With a bit more manual control of the various lighting elements and levels, it could be better, but then probably wouldn't comply with the rules, since user could put in wrong mode. So I want to mod it.

    If it had levels or a dimmer knob, it would be a far more versatile light. If I could figure out how to open it up, I might add one, as well as a mode switch. But I can't get into it. Does anybody know how to open it up without wrecking it? Seems tight or glued.
    Last edited by JPLabs; 06-14-2019, 07:58 AM.

  • joebreeze
    commented on 's reply
    So how did you wire it up .
    I've got a Wolf V2 pack. XT-90(x2) discharge , can you use the spare XT90 ?
    What cables/connectors does it ship with.

  • JPLabs
    commented on 's reply
    OK, I shopped more, looking for brackets, and found a screaming deal - I ordered the above B&M Lumotec IQ-X E from Bike24 in Germany. Instead of about $200 shipped from Mr. White, I payed less than $79 USD + $19 shipping, from Germany. 2 weeks or less.

    https://www.bike24.com/1.php?content=8;product=193881
    Last edited by JPLabs; 05-18-2019, 03:28 PM.

  • JPLabs
    commented on 's reply
    FYI it looks like the "Nylon mount for 1 1/8 steerer tubes" is a mounting option available from Peter White Cycles, for my Bluto Fork...just tried to order the IQx-e, but they are closed for weekend.

    The beamshots and design sold me. I really appreciate a good pattern without overblown close area illumination, and am excited to find this.

    I'd rather have a low level, too, but this is high, or DRL, only. Auto switching for day or night. I plan to try adding a PWM motor speed control as a dimmer, between driver and LED, for when 150 Lux is way too much. Moonlit nights, etc. Hope I don't blow it up!
    Last edited by JPLabs; 05-16-2019, 02:01 PM.

  • tklop
    commented on 's reply
    Glad to help, JPLabs! Their stuff is truly top-shelf--with lots of price-levels and a broad product-line. I like 'em.

  • JPLabs
    replied
    The B&M IQx-e looks pretty great, from same site tklop linked. Ebike specific, up to 60V. Bit less expensive, too. Fabulous looking pattern. Needs external switch if you want to turn it off. I'm seriously considering one.

    Thanks for getting me back onto their site, tklop! Or I wouldn't have seen it...

    Leave a comment:

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