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Front vs. rear brake panic stop?

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    #16
    I'm actually trying Sheldon Browns advice of front brake only for panic stops. The rear end stays in line which is one less distraction to deal with in a serious braking situation. I hit both braked for an initial grab but then front only once the weight shifts forward. The rear brake can be used for steering as needed. All my riding is pavement so this doesn't apply to off road riding.

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    • AZguy
      AZguy commented
      Editing a comment
      On smooth hard surface going mostly straight the rear brake is pretty much pointless at speed - you can use enough front brake that there's almost no pressure (traction) on the rear anyway

      The rougher, looser, slower and the more you are turning shifts emphasis to the rear since all of those will decrease the ability of the front to stay in control and the bike upright with hard braking

      On a moto coming into a turn in the dirt I'll scrub speed first with the front then as approaching the turn get the back sliding away from the turn - sliding a rear wheel sideways will scrub speed very quickly and point you into the turn, then as you approach the apex the throttle is increasing until exiting the apex and the back wheel is coming back in line with the front and throttle is wide open generally from the apex on.. watch a flat tracker

    • Retrorockit
      Retrorockit commented
      Editing a comment
      My current challenge is the small traffic circle they installed in my ride. I have to enter it fast because the bike lane ends just before it,so I don't want cars passing me there. The a sharp right, a long slightly open left, then another tight right. I straighten out the first right, then brake with the rear to get the front end down into the fork travel, lean it over the other way for the exit and try to keep some weight on the front so it doesn't run wide accelerating out of the circle 3/4 of the way around.The Schwalbe Big Ben Plus tires with the soft Ebike compound really work well for this. If I carry enough speed through here the oncoming cars aren't a problem because they have to slow down enough that I can just ride out of the circle between them.

    #17
    I didn't read every word of this thread but did the rider weight ever come up? My guess is that can be a large factor. You add 100 lbs of rider weight I think that significantly changes things. At at little over 250 I don't get the feeling that it would be easy for me to go over the bars. Is it a linear relationship? More weight means more weight shift forward and more traction so assuming you have the brake power could a 150 lb person go over the bars as easy as a 250?

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    • Retrorockit
      Retrorockit commented
      Editing a comment
      The weight is always higher than the contact patch of the tire. Looked at another way unless your riding a recumbent the Center of gravity of the bike is higher. So from a seated position it will be worse. But MTB riders with narrow saddles, and short or dropper seat posts shift their weight over the back wheel. In that situation it may help or be equal.

    #18
    I was taught, lead with the back follow with the front, saves the front wheel sliding sideways or locking with 'panic' braking.

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    • Retrorockit
      Retrorockit commented
      Editing a comment
      #1 I don't PANIC brake.Almost all of my experience is 4 wheels, so I do ask questions form more experienced riders. But I'm comfortable driving sideways, backwards, whatever. Also I learned to drive before ABS was a thing. A lot of things I know how to do don't translate well to 2 wheels. I've found that Sheldon Browns suggestion of all front braking for hard stops eliminates the sideways component completely. It can be added back in as needed with the rear brake.It only took me a few seconds on the bike to confirm his theory.

    • AZguy
      AZguy commented
      Editing a comment
      The front won't slide sideways unless it loses traction - use less brake than that... if going at speed, straight on smooth hard surface you can grab a ton of brake - heck I've done long stoppies (on purpose) on my big bike...

      If turning and/or loose/rough terrain, slow speeds, etc. then use less but if you want to stop quickly from seed there is pretty much always going to be front brake involved and I'm likely leading with it since in general it's where the stopping power is...

      It's ok for the rear to lose some traction but it has to be managed

    • Retrorockit
      Retrorockit commented
      Editing a comment
      I don't have a problem managing loss of traction at the rear. But with 100% front braking (straight stop) it doesn't happen to begin with.
      Now if you're a certified PANIC braker then you will go OTB and have to sue somebody.

    #19
    I'm thinking more around where I live, most of the roads/lanes have a degree of gravel on them and the tracks are at best muddy. I agree hard on the front is best IF the surface is good and you're going in a straight line.

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      #20
      I suppose I DID put "panic stop" in the title.So my bad for ranting about that term.

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