Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Front vs. rear brake panic stop?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Retrorockit
    replied
    I suppose I DID put "panic stop" in the title.So my bad for ranting about that term.

    Leave a comment:


  • myozone
    replied
    I'm thinking more around where I live, most of the roads/lanes have a degree of gravel on them and the tracks are at best muddy. I agree hard on the front is best IF the surface is good and you're going in a straight line.

    Leave a comment:


  • Retrorockit
    commented on 's reply
    I don't have a problem managing loss of traction at the rear. But with 100% front braking (straight stop) it doesn't happen to begin with.
    Now if you're a certified PANIC braker then you will go OTB and have to sue somebody.

  • AZguy
    commented on 's reply
    The front won't slide sideways unless it loses traction - use less brake than that... if going at speed, straight on smooth hard surface you can grab a ton of brake - heck I've done long stoppies (on purpose) on my big bike...

    If turning and/or loose/rough terrain, slow speeds, etc. then use less but if you want to stop quickly from seed there is pretty much always going to be front brake involved and I'm likely leading with it since in general it's where the stopping power is...

    It's ok for the rear to lose some traction but it has to be managed

  • Retrorockit
    commented on 's reply
    #1 I don't PANIC brake.Almost all of my experience is 4 wheels, so I do ask questions form more experienced riders. But I'm comfortable driving sideways, backwards, whatever. Also I learned to drive before ABS was a thing. A lot of things I know how to do don't translate well to 2 wheels. I've found that Sheldon Browns suggestion of all front braking for hard stops eliminates the sideways component completely. It can be added back in as needed with the rear brake.It only took me a few seconds on the bike to confirm his theory.

  • myozone
    replied
    I was taught, lead with the back follow with the front, saves the front wheel sliding sideways or locking with 'panic' braking.

    Leave a comment:


  • Retrorockit
    commented on 's reply
    The weight is always higher than the contact patch of the tire. Looked at another way unless your riding a recumbent the Center of gravity of the bike is higher. So from a seated position it will be worse. But MTB riders with narrow saddles, and short or dropper seat posts shift their weight over the back wheel. In that situation it may help or be equal.

  • 73Eldo
    replied
    I didn't read every word of this thread but did the rider weight ever come up? My guess is that can be a large factor. You add 100 lbs of rider weight I think that significantly changes things. At at little over 250 I don't get the feeling that it would be easy for me to go over the bars. Is it a linear relationship? More weight means more weight shift forward and more traction so assuming you have the brake power could a 150 lb person go over the bars as easy as a 250?

    Leave a comment:


  • Retrorockit
    commented on 's reply
    My current challenge is the small traffic circle they installed in my ride. I have to enter it fast because the bike lane ends just before it,so I don't want cars passing me there. The a sharp right, a long slightly open left, then another tight right. I straighten out the first right, then brake with the rear to get the front end down into the fork travel, lean it over the other way for the exit and try to keep some weight on the front so it doesn't run wide accelerating out of the circle 3/4 of the way around.The Schwalbe Big Ben Plus tires with the soft Ebike compound really work well for this. If I carry enough speed through here the oncoming cars aren't a problem because they have to slow down enough that I can just ride out of the circle between them.

  • AZguy
    commented on 's reply
    On smooth hard surface going mostly straight the rear brake is pretty much pointless at speed - you can use enough front brake that there's almost no pressure (traction) on the rear anyway

    The rougher, looser, slower and the more you are turning shifts emphasis to the rear since all of those will decrease the ability of the front to stay in control and the bike upright with hard braking

    On a moto coming into a turn in the dirt I'll scrub speed first with the front then as approaching the turn get the back sliding away from the turn - sliding a rear wheel sideways will scrub speed very quickly and point you into the turn, then as you approach the apex the throttle is increasing until exiting the apex and the back wheel is coming back in line with the front and throttle is wide open generally from the apex on.. watch a flat tracker

  • Retrorockit
    replied
    I'm actually trying Sheldon Browns advice of front brake only for panic stops. The rear end stays in line which is one less distraction to deal with in a serious braking situation. I hit both braked for an initial grab but then front only once the weight shifts forward. The rear brake can be used for steering as needed. All my riding is pavement so this doesn't apply to off road riding.

    Leave a comment:


  • billyk
    replied
    NEVER EVER LAY YOUR BIKE DOWN ON PURPOSE. Laying a bike down is when the bike has decided to eject it's incompetent rider!

    I ride mine everywhere I go. I choose not to hit anything solid on the road or off the road. Maneuvering around cages that pull in front of you is your best option. I've never seen a riding course that advocates laying your bike down, unless you have pulled your gun and are hiding behind it as your sliding to a stop. I have 39 years on several Harley motorcycles and over 250k miles. 60 years on bicycles and maybe 4k miles. I've hit solid objects on the bicycle, but not on a motorcycle.

    Leave a comment:


  • Retrorockit
    commented on 's reply
    I paid $800 for the Scout 4x4 wagon with 302 already in it. Used car dealer couldn't get it to crank. Moved the battery ground strap from a rusty fender bolt to the engine block. The only way I could keep my license in the 55mph days was to go offroading and then drive home normal.Offroading in South florida is a very relative term. Fire roads, and some slick as ice tidal mud flats. I will take a 2wd with a limited slip over an open diff 4x4 any day. But yeah 2wd needs some weight in the back.
    Last edited by Retrorockit; 09-10-2019, 10:10 AM.

  • Retrorockit
    commented on 's reply
    I paid $800 for the Scout wagon with 302 already in it. Used car dealer couldn't get it to crank. Moved the battery ground strap from a rusty fender bolt to the engine block. The only way I could keep my license in the 55mph days was to go offroading and then drive home normal.Offroading in South florida is a very relative term. Fire roads, and some slick as ice tidal mud flats

  • AZguy
    commented on 's reply
    The good/bad old days for sure =]

    That van was an '80 (give or take one or two) Dodge B100 with a 360ci 4-bbl... bought it for $800... Thing had juevos but back then the speed limit nationwide was 55 and most the places I was running it was enforced... Still would fly when I felt the need. Bought it with low-profile tires on it and replaced the rear with big mud tires so had that stink bug stance for sure... shag carpet and paneling... just needed to hang out by the high schools (maybe in a nun's habit?) to really fit the profile...

    Even the two wheel drive climbed just about anything - kept a 600cc DS moto in the back.... you know... for traction ;-} Served me well for my first couple of years hang gliding until I finally moved up to a big '89 3/4ton econoline...

    Sometimes I'm nostalgic for the simplicity (and fun) of life back then...
Working...
X