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Tire stud and tool interchange? And which do you like best?

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    Tire stud and tool interchange? And which do you like best?

    Getting ready for ice and snow. Picked up some used 45NRTH studded tires to get and idea if I like it or not without having to spend the big bucks on new ones. Both sellers said to get some spare studs and the tool.

    As far as I can tell Schwalbe and 45Nrth studs will interchange as well as the tool. The Schwalbe tool seems to be a lot more readily available and looks to be a screwdriver shape. The 45Nrth is more of a T handle but out of stock most places and seems to have been that way since it came out several years ago.

    45's headquarters is only about 15 miles from be, too bad I can't just ride over there and get one. Oddly the studs seem opposite the 45's are in stock everywhere but the Sch's are sold out.

    #2
    Doesn't look like I will find out any time soon. Was at a local store picking up a chain for my latest build and saw their display of 45Nrth tires and asked if they had the tool and they did. Even bigger bonus was it was the same price of $9.99 it is online so I now have the 45Nrth tool to go with my replacement 45Nrth studs on my 45Nrth tires. They didn't have any Schwalbe studded tires or studs in stock to compare to so could not even look at em.

    Too bad the Sram chain I really needed was twice the price as online, even with shipping I paid more in the store but I got to go for a ride later that night instead of maybe sometime the next day.

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      #3
      As far as I can tell studs and stud tools will interchange between all the major brands. All mine turned out to be 45nrth so I have bought the 45nrth T handle tool and their standard concave studs.

      Other things I have learned is that they are a pain in the butt to install and there are a lot of them in most models of tires. A pair in my size came up for sale used for a decent price and didn't sell right away so I made an offer and got them. They look to be in good shape but were advertised as 'custom pattern' to save weight. Didn't think too hard about that thinking maybe I don't care and can always get replacements. Turns out a little over 1/3 were missing which is 122 per tire. 300 pack of studs now on order for $80 so my good deal turned into an OK deal. Second thing I didn't think was a big deal was I could see they had been run tubeless. I don't want to run tubeless and never have so how hard can it be to clean that stuff up? Answer is well over an hour of scrubbing in hot soapy water and they are a lot better.

      I got the 45Nrth T handle tool and can't imagine doing it with a screwdriver type like Schwalbe sells. Even with the T my hand got really sore after 100. The 45Nrth tool isn't very big, I kind wish it was a little larger. I have seen some that are more of a pistol shape which I think would really help especially if its also a little larger than the 45 tool. IF you are just replacing a few here and there that fall out it likely doesn't matter but if you are having to do a lot a comfortable tool would be a must. I don't think I would buy them unstuded then buy the studs unless you have a lot of time on your hands or you can make your kids do it for you.

      Another note is if the tire gets used without studs or missing studs you can get rocks in the pockets which can be a little tricky to get out. You can do it but its just a pain when you get one that won't seat. You have to put down the stud tool and get something to pick the rock out. I found a small jewlers screwdriver worked well.

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        #4
        Ran across these guys and their tool. Not positive on the scale that its much bigger than the 45nrth one but the asymmetric grip looks more comfortable and the magnet should allow you to wear gloves easier.

        https://bikestud.com/collections/new...insertion-tool

        Several reasons you may want to wear gloves. Used tires may be dirty, studs can be sharp, and it does take a fair amount of force and twisting so I was starting to have a sore spot that could have got a lot worse if I had to keep going.

        Reason the magnet makes the gloves easier is almost everyone uses soapy water as a lube. Without the magnet you need to use your finger to hold the stud in the tool as you dip it in the water then move it to the tire. Full finger glove I suppose could get wet but seemed more messy and maybe hard on the glove and finger less gloves wouldn't help with the sharp or dirt aspects of things.

        I'm not sure that their studs are that much cheaper at least compared to the 45nrth ones so i just went with the 45nrths. If you didn't want the concave ones which 45 doesn't apparently offer anymore you could save several cents per stud with them but all mine are 45's with the concaves so I figured I would stay with them.

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          #5
          One thing about running studded tires on pavement is you don't seem to need your bell very often. The people that can't hear the growl are the same ones that can't hear the bell because of their headphones so they still get mad but at least with the studs you have the traction to get away.

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            #6
            Originally posted by 73Eldo View Post
            One thing about running studded tires on pavement is you don't seem to need your bell very often. The people that can't hear the growl are the same ones that can't hear the bell because of their headphones so they still get mad but at least with the studs you have the traction to get away.
            Im hoping to get some winter rides in this year. I totally appreciate the growl sound! It strangely kind of sounds like you are running over a few sheets of bubble wrap to me for some reason. I usually run just a front studded tire but both go with both when it’s super icy out. I remember many moons ago when I decided to ride all year long. I started with non studded mountain bike tires and can’t believe I didn’t break anything.

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              #7
              Just curious why not run one on the rear too? Have occasionally heard that but no one has said why and a few said they did it because they were cheap but when they finally did both they would never go back. I know they are not cheap but doctors cost more and are much less fun.

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                #8
                Originally posted by 73Eldo View Post
                Just curious why not run one on the rear too? Have occasionally heard that but no one has said why and a few said they did it because they were cheap but when they finally did both they would never go back. I know they are not cheap but doctors cost more and are much less fun.
                So I would generally run only a studded front just when ice is very rare but may be present. I can usually catch the rear (with studded front) but never the front. A bit of weight is also saved. And I’m talking mountain bike here. But when it’s icy there is no substitute for a front and rear. I’ve ridden across frozen pond and streams (where I could not even stand) with both rear and front studs. It’s just like your in the dirt. Just amazing grip!

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                  #9
                  I got motivated enough to pull a wheel off a shelf. Maybe it’s time to mount them up now? These are 26” Nokians. I’ve put many miles on them and have only lost a couple studs. I was usually off road which may account for the studs staying in place though.
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                    #10
                    Got any ice or snow? If so I would put it on if you got it.

                    I should go out and see if I have lost any. Done a couple rides on the fat bike including one on the trails and then about 17 miles of mostly pavement on the street bike. Pretty sure it was warm enough today that the snow melted off them which is one reason I didn't check em when I finished the rides.

                    As for weight 72 grams for a 240 studs which is around the number in most of the 45Nrth tires. A little prospective, water is around 29 grams per ounce so carrying 2 1/2 fluid ounces less would save the same amount of weight.

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                      #11
                      Not a super careful inspection, full fenders make it harder to get a good look without more effort but it doesn't look like I lost any on either bike. Oddly many of the rear ones on the fat bike look a bit wonky but its possible they were like that before. That could have been the 2nd tire I bought used and had to put studs in because of 'weight savings' by the previous owner. If you ride without studs the pockets tend to fill with rocks and other crap. If that was the 2nd tire I had to do I was way over the whole concept and just wanted to be done so I didn't put as much effort into making darn sure they were fully seated and no crap was in the pockets. I don't think it was actually weight savings I think he bought them without studs and figured out what a hassle and expense it is to install them all so he went with about half so from the above math saved about 1 fluid ounce of water worth of weight but maybe more importantly that was $80 in studs and likely some blisters and cramps in the hands.

                      I was just reading some reviews and there are tons of people complaining about loosing 50 or more studs after one ride. That was another reason I didn't inspect mine sooner, I was happier not knowing. The trail I rode was a green without a ton of rocks or roots so not a lot of concern about loosing them there but on the way to the park I hit some curbs and several places was spinning the back tire with the throttle trying to get through deeper snow and I was thinking that there had to have been times where the tire was spinning and finally cut through the snow and hit the pavement below. Figured that would maybe kick some out but either it doesn't or I was getting traction just from float and compaction before I actually hit the pavement. The other place I thought I would loose them was a 35mph downhill pavement run I like to do. Didn't know if they would just fly out at those speeds or what. Apparently not.

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