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Anyone using or have tried a 'dry' or wax chain lube?

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  • Retrorockit
    replied
    For bicycles Squirt is a readily availabkle wax lube that shifts well. Maybe the Honda lube would be good for an IGH bike? I find that every 40 miles or so is a good period for E bike chains. Probably because they're running beyond their intended load on a BBSHD bike.

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  • SurPaully
    commented on 's reply
    No issues TNT, as I trust your intent especially with your background. And I have no issues if someone proves me wrong for their use and riding conditions. Lol-

  • TNC
    replied
    And Paully, my comments were certainly no dismissal of your suggestion because I certainly haven't run across all the products out there. I also still do some part time work at a motorcycle shop I've worked at since the 70's, and I've worked at a bicycle shop since 2004. Chain lube debates can get as cantankerous as engine oil debates...LOL! Bicycle chains and their multi-cog cassettes can be real PITA's when it comes to lube and where the bike is ridden. I see a lot of difference when it comes to roadies vs. mountain bikers, and there are some lubes that seem to work for both...but there is never any consensus across the board...LOL!

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  • SurPaully
    commented on 's reply
    Yes, a 2021 Sur Ron, and you are correct-no shifting mechanism. I’ve used it on my Specialized FatBoy, mostly used on road. But you bring up a great point-certain riding conditions, as well as cassette type gears might get gummy vs the slickness of TriFlow. I’ve been using it on any application that has a chain due to little or no fling. If you clean chain first(WD40) and let the Honda chain lube dry for a while, wipe off excess, fling free for most part. It contains Moly & PTFE. $9 for a 15oz can at the Honda Dealer in Santa Rosa.

  • SurPaully
    commented on 's reply
    Yes, all Honda dealerships carry this. I use it on quads, dirt bikes, pit bike, street bike, and now the Sur Ron

  • TNC
    replied
    Originally posted by SurPaully View Post
    I have great success using Pro Honda Chain Lube. If you clean the chain first, apply, let it dry, then wipe, it doesn’t fling & lasts for a long time. Touching chain no longer leaves a mess and no fling to clean off motor & spokes.
    Being a dirt and street motorcycle guy too, I'm going to say beware of moto chain lubes. No, I'm not first hand familiar with the Honda product, but I can say over years of trying all manner of motorcycle level chain lubes, I haven't seen one yet that is truly suitable for a cassette style bicycle drivetrain. The reason is because of heat, pressure, and speed of a motorcycle chain. Anything I'm aware of that will stay on a motorcycle chain has always made the shifting, jockey wheels, and cassette gum up or get stiff. A bicycle chain has to remain quite flexible for good shifting, and there have even been bicycle specific chain lubes that screwed that up.

    Paully, I'm not saying you couldn't have stumbled on to the holy grail of chain lubes, but I haven't seen one yet to truly cross over. Paully, you have "Sur" in your screen name. Are you a Sur-Ron owner? I could see a good motorcycle chain lube working on a Sur-Ron perfectly since it uses a motorcycle chain and the chain is not a shifting mechanism.

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  • 73Eldo
    replied
    No mess sounds like it would be worth a try. I assume its available at places that sell Honda parts?

    On yesterdays ride I think at times I heard a slight squeak from my chain. I know its been a few weeks since I lubed it but with work picking up i don't think I have that many miles on, maybe the low 100's. When I was averaging 20 miles per day 4-5 days a week weekly seemed to be plenty unless it got wet so I guess maybe for me 100 or so miles is the magic lube number.

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  • SurPaully
    replied
    I have great success using Pro Honda Chain Lube. If you clean the chain first, apply, let it dry, then wipe, it doesn’t fling & lasts for a long time. Touching chain no longer leaves a mess and no fling to clean off motor & spokes.

    Leave a comment:


  • Beachbum
    replied
    The motorcycle community have been on the wax chain lube for a long time. Big spray cans that seem to last forever. Old School “bikers” I have known would boil a clean new chain isa mix that included paraffin. I like the spray on Wax and use it regularly on my bicycles, bikes and Ebikes.

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  • Retrorockit
    replied
    The wax lubes seem to form a "dry" shell that doesn't transfer as easily as oil based lubes. They get just as dirty, but stay where you put them better.

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  • AZguy
    replied
    What makes chains so nasty is that they shed tiny metal particles into the lube - it's the metal particles that stain, the lube is just the very effective carrier

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  • 73Eldo
    replied
    I recently did some upgrades to a friends BBS02 ride that required some chain handling and just completed an HD conversion for a co worker and boy is there a difference in mess between regular lube and the Squirt type wax. The 02 ride came from a guy that I'm sure was using some likely higher end bicycle specific lube and looked like he really cared for his stuff and that was the typical staining nasty to handle. The bike I did the HD on I'm not sure what was on that, what ever it was was made my hands more dirty than changing the injection pump on one of my diesels.

    No signs of chain stretch on either of my bikes yet. The street one has a few hundred miles on it so far and the trail one maybe a little over 100 but those are hard dirty miles. I'm maybe 1/4 of the way down the summer lube bottle so it looks like the small 4 oz bottle will get me through at least a season for 2 bikes so the lube cost isn't going to be a factor.

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  • Dshue
    commented on 's reply
    That's the biggest drawback to fenders. But in a pinch it's not too bad to remove them. I have a 1980 Olds Cutlass and it's trunk is probably the size of your trunks useable space. While everything would fit it would require the same amount of disassembly.

  • 73Eldo
    replied
    Ride before last I was thinking maybe I was sometimes hearing a slight chain squeak. I was trying to remember when I last lubed it and how many miles it had been, thinking it had been over 100 miles and there was a light rain on part of a ride so it got a refresh and the possible noise seemed to go away.

    Last ride was my first many miles by car to the trail ride in many years. Most of the car trips have been pretty short, this one was a couple hours each way. I got an older Hollywood fork mount hitch rack that has a lot of miles on it and has always done well and guess what, my 73 Eldorado convertible. About 30 miles in looking at the bike in the rearview I starting thinking it looked different but kept think I was just seeing things. Eventually I decided that something just wasn't right so pulled over and found the bike was at about a 45* angle, the bracket that the bar that hold the bike on the hitch frame had bent.

    All I had was my little bike pack tool kit so my only option was to strip the bike down far enough to fit in the trunk. Yes its a big trunk but has a spare tire and part of it is taken up by the top too. Bike was fully loaded with full fenders and a rear rack that all had to come off along with the rear tire to fit. That meant a fair amount very recently lubed chain handling to get it in the trunk and then to re assemble it at a friends place before hitting the trails. After getting it in the trunk on the side of the road I did grab a napkin and easily wipe off what was on my hands. After repairing the rack and re assembling most of the bike I used the same napkin to clean my hands again. After the ride back on the car ride home I noticed some grease like marks on my arm likely from lifting the bike in and out of the trunk which also wiped off with that same napkin.

    Also note that a bike carrier that holes the bikes sideways on a car, vs some sort of SUV will expose the bikes to a lot of wind and if you got things like fat ish tires, fenders, rack, battery bag that add side profile to the bike that rack is going to have a lot of stress on what ever part of it is holding the front to back stresses. My temp fix was a stick duct taped in at an angle to make a sort of kickstand from the seat to the heavier hitch frame. Better fix will be some gussets welded where it bent plus I think I will make a stick that doesn't require duct tape to stay on.

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  • Retrorockit
    replied
    I broke one Connex link, and one time the chain parted where I had spliced it. More experience with the Rohloff chain tool I think has solved that. The last chain I got had side play at the Connex link. I feel that play would focus all the side load on the chain in one place, which is also the thinnest link. So the sloppy fit there is also a factor in my no longer using them.

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