Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Opinion: Whats the best tire width for electric bike?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Opinion: Whats the best tire width for electric bike?

    i want to hear your thoughts about tire thickness, how thick or how slim you need to get that smooth and durable ride?

    #2
    The whole trend in bicycles is fatter and fatter tires. They have found that fatter tires roll easier and it is not until you pass 12 mph or so that the air resistance of fatter tires becomes a negative. http://www.schwalbetires.com/tech_in...ing_resistance This is a quick read with great info.

    I have a cruiser with 26X2.125 tires and I have ordered a replacement bike with 26X3.50 tires. I also plan on moving up to 26X4.00 ASAP. I think most everyone would like or has thought about fatter tires on their bike.

    Comment


      #3
      Fatter, softer tires will roll way easier on softer surfaces, as opposed to narrower tires which sink into the ground.

      Fatter tires soak up bumps better. They also handle worse and are less efficient, the harder the surface and the faster you go. Wider tires are more likely to hit sharp road debris and get punctured, since they cover a wider path.

      The more you tend to go slow, ride soft surfaces, and like smoothing bumps, the wider the tire that probably suits you. For street handling and range on pavement, go narrower and harder.
      Last edited by JPLabs; 12-04-2016, 08:59 AM.
      Fabrication is fun! Build something today. Show someone. Let them help. Inspire and share. Spread the desire.

      Comment


        #4
        I use 26" Vee Snowshoe 2XL tires at 20psi front and rear and I couldn't be happier. They have an outer diameter of 31.5" and a width of 5.05". I use them on the pavement at an average speed of 28mph on a bike with no suspension (hardtail, fork), a rear hub motor, and most of the weight in the rear. The rear tire is projected to last 1000 miles and the front tire seems to not wear at all. I have had no flats in 800 miles and counting.

        Comment


          #5
          I just logged in to ask the same question. Good timing pcliteuser!
          I have a BBSHD on my fatbike (road commuter) and had some 26x3.8" Vee Chicane tyres (120tpi) running tubeless. Yesterday about 32km into a ride the tread tore and all the air (and sealant) came gushing out.
          There was nothing on the road that could've caused the tear so my question is - was the tyre just not tough enough to handle the tubeless/expansion/weight/speed etc of an e-bike?



          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by j0hnj0hns View Post
            I just logged in to ask the same question. Good timing pcliteuser!
            I have a BBSHD on my fatbike (road commuter) and had some 26x3.8" Vee Chicane tyres (120tpi) running tubeless. Yesterday about 32km into a ride the tread tore and all the air (and sealant) came gushing out.
            There was nothing on the road that could've caused the tear so my question is - was the tyre just not tough enough to handle the tubeless/expansion/weight/speed etc of an e-bike?


            Well that certainly is a bad review of Vee Chicane tires. I don't know if that was a manufacturing defect or if you got some old tire, but you gotta think the Vee Chicane is off the list now. Was your tire pressure over the limit? I wonder what would transpire if you took that tire back to the retailer and asked about a warranty claim.

            Comment


            • j0hnj0hns
              j0hnj0hns commented
              Editing a comment
              Looks like they'll replace it for me so it might just of been a one-off dodgy tyre. But I'm just wondering if anyone else has had similar experiences. If so then I'll just sell them on and find an alternative - The 4.8" Jumbo Jims I originally used seemed to do a good job but they just wear fast and wake the neighbourhood when I leave for work :)

              Oh yeah, I was only running 14psi (firmer but not rock hard) so nowhere near over-inflated.
              Last edited by j0hnj0hns; 12-04-2016, 06:06 PM. Reason: Forgot to mention PSI

            #7
            I want my tires to be bulletproof. I don't have time to change a tire in the dark, the cold, etc. Tannus for the win.

            http://www.cycletogo.com/tannus-no-f...-tire-options/
            A list of all the different Tannus solid foam bike tires models and available colors.

            Comment


            • j0hnj0hns
              j0hnj0hns commented
              Editing a comment
              Be handy if they made a fatbike tyre. Might be too heavy though I guess.

            #8
            i have 27.5 and max tire width is only 2.4 should i stick to the max width? i'm not planning to run tubeless on them but instead i'm gonna hook them up with slime tubes coz tubeless is hard to inflate :(

            Comment


              #9
              I like my Montague with it's narrow tires, when I'm on pavement or fairly smooth gravel, definitely less aero drag and friction. I hate it on real rocky stuff. The fat bike (4") is great on the rocky stuff, but it sucks on pavement. Point being.... ? Maybe something in between would be the way to "go", if I was setting up only one bike to ride. Having two, I just the best one for the mission that day.

              I really don't want to ride the fattie in town, this is a holdover from my airplane operations. My little airplane has comically large tires, run at 3 or 4 lbs pressure. They are made to handle very rough terrain. They wear fast and kind of also suck on pavement. So, it is a point of pride to stay OFF the pavement, and ON the very rough stuff, off airport in other words. A lot of pilots have these specialized tires, just to look cool, while at their local paved strip where they stay most of the time! In other words, riding my fat bike on a smooth paved road makes me feel like poseur, plus I don't like the handling and the wear factor. Those Tannus tires look pretty cool.

              Comment


                #10
                For pavement commuting, I prefer 700C by 32-40 tires (Continental or Schwalbe), at 65-90psi. I think, but am not positive, under these conditions fat tires have roughly 3 times the rolling resistance. Mounted on 36 spoke machine-trued wheels, these tires are holding up 400lbs of bike & rider at 30MPH on the flats, throttle only.

                And, who'd a thunk it, but somebody seems to be performing independent rolling resistance tests: http://www.bicyclerollingresistance.com/
                Last edited by ncrkd; 12-08-2016, 10:04 AM.
                2nd build, 2018 Crust Scapegoat, BBS02 or BBSHD, Rohloff IGH
                3rd build, 2018 Crust Evasion step-thru, BBS02, Shimano Nexus INTER-3 IGH
                4th build, 2016 Salsa Marrakesh flatbar frameset, BBSHD, Alfine 8 IGH
                Other, Electronic throttle lock

                Visit the forum knowledge base

                Comment


                  #11
                  Once you go fat it's hard to go back

                  Comment


                    #12
                    I looked at the link for rolling resistance. It does look like the fat tires tested have triple the rolling resistance. It looks like a fat tire might tax your system an extra 30W.

                    I didn't see any test for any fat bike tire larger than 4.00" wide. My tires are 5.05" wide so I probably have quadruple the rolling resistance.

                    In theory, one should choose the reduced rolling resistance if the tire fits their application, but personally I run very fat tires and just "waste" the extra power. This is all bad for motor heat, range and cost. I am wasting about 40W. Inefficiency is not a good thing, but I love the look of fat, knobby tires.

                    Maybe fat tire bikes are the ebike version of an SUV gas hog where people drive them on the street because they like the looks and want to be able to go offroad without switching to another vehicle.

                    Edit: After posting this, I realized that the added resistance is for each tire, so running fat tires will tax your system an extra 60-80W. Ugh.
                    Last edited by commuter ebikes; 12-10-2016, 11:30 AM.

                    Comment


                      #13
                      Originally posted by ncrkd View Post
                      For pavement commuting, I prefer 700C by 32-40 tires (Continental or Schwalbe), at 65-90psi. I think, but am not positive, under these conditions fat tires have roughly 3 times the rolling resistance. Mounted on 36 spoke machine-trued wheels, these tires are holding up 400lbs of bike & rider at 30MPH on the flats, throttle only.

                      And, who'd a thunk it, but somebody seems to be performing independent rolling resistance tests: http://www.bicyclerollingresistance.com/
                      That is a great link. Schwalbe says their balloon tires have less rolling resistance but they are 2.3" not the 4.0" of some tires. Schwalbe had a 29er 2.3" that did really good.

                      Well everything is compromises bikes or cars, heavy smooth and comfortable will use more gas or juice.

                      Comment


                        #14
                        I run 4.8 surly bud and Lou have done for the last 7 months .
                        I commuted to work 3 or 4 days a week with out any motor 30km round trip.
                        I have been very impressed with the performance of these tyres on and off road, motor or peddle only.
                        one things for sure with the bbshd there's no worries about roll resistance .
                        the bud on the back is going bald fast now but it's all ready done 1600 km road time .
                        the surly Lou on the front still holding strong almost new looking.
                        I don't think I'll ever go back to a standard tyre
                        I'm interested in the new
                        27.5 plus tyre 4inch set up like on the new carbon trek farley .
                        it ls possible that I'd go there next .

                        Comment


                        • calfee20
                          calfee20 commented
                          Editing a comment
                          I didn't know fat tires were appearing in the larger rim sizes. I knew about 2.3s and 3.0s but not the bigger ones..........cool

                        • j0hnj0hns
                          j0hnj0hns commented
                          Editing a comment
                          I've got a trek Farley 9 with the 27.5 x 4 hodag tyres. In Australia a replacement is incredibly hard to find and expensive. I've been waiting for Maxxis to bring their 27.5 fat tyres out.

                        #15
                        The best e bike tire for regular width I have found so far is Schwalbe Marathon Deluxe EVO at around $65 each from the US site in Washington state.
                        They have good protection and rolling resistance is quite low while the 2" wide tires are fairly smooth in the center with lugs outside to save from tragedy.
                        The compound used is good for all weather conditions and they have excellent road grip with low noise level.
                        The tires are rated for fast e bikes, (50km/h), so they should hold up at higher speeds better than most.

                        It's very hard to find decent tires rated for 50 km that don't weigh a ton, at least for 2" width, and the only place I've seen these is on the North American website.
                        I was running the old SuperMoto tires from Schwalbe, and they were smooth and fast; but I got several flats so I abandoned them after around 1200 km and installed my winter tires.
                        My Winter tires are Schwalbe Ice Spiker Pro's with all the studs removed!
                        They aren't the best flat protection, (already got a flat this year); but they have grip to spare running up and down these icy hills.

                        I'm conscious of the European regulations for e bike tires and have tried to find suitable tires in America in my size with the higher rating.
                        I even went to an e bike shop here in Seattle area, (I think it was Rad), and not one bike out of dozens in their arsenal had even the 25 km/h rated tires!
                        They claimed to know nothing of such things...To be fair it did not look as if any of their bikes could hit 25 km/h anyway - they were heavy steel frames with the cheapest parts like Shimano Acura derailleurs.
                        Two customers followed me out of the store to inquire about my bike...I sent them to Luna :-)
                        Approximately once a day I end up giving out Luna Cycle info to inquirers as many folks will ask about the bike especially when I ride the trains.

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X