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Opinion: Whats the best tire width for electric bike?

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  • AZguy
    commented on 's reply
    Ordered the 4.8 minions yesterday =]

  • Retrorockit
    replied
    A recumbent E bike would have range, and speed going for it. But without a place to take advantage of it I don't see one in my future. I think it's a cool project. But I don't think you'll see very many of them.
    Comments are kind of funny here. I've got a couple DIY build threads with 1500 views each, and almost no comments. I got 1 "like" for a flat tire at night with a 5 mile walk home! If you post it I bet a lot of people will read it.
    Last edited by Retrorockit; 05-23-2019, 04:50 AM.

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  • calfee20
    replied
    Originally posted by Retrorockit View Post
    I'm digging that recumbent in the background. Mostly because I wouldn't dare ride one on the street here in South Florida.
    I was just North of Tampa for 10 weeks. I put 2000 miles on my Electra fat cruiser and a KMX trike ALL on bike paths.

    That trike in the background is my new HP Velotechnik fp 26 Scorpion. I just finished phase 1. I was going to do a small build thread but I haven't gotten any comments on a few of my other recent posts so I may not bother.

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  • Retrorockit
    replied
    I'm digging that recumbent in the background. Mostly because I wouldn't dare ride one on the street here in South Florida.

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  • AZguy
    replied
    The bulldozers I'm running aren't likely much quieter Click image for larger version  Name:	evil.gif Views:	1 Size:	343 Bytes ID:	87257

    Yup, that's what I'm thinkin' Click image for larger version  Name:	nod.gif Views:	4 Size:	990 Bytes ID:	87258

    Although there's no way the 4.8's are fitting a rad and I'm digging the biggies - these will be for my boris
    With rad I've got 4.0's a lot less noisy and more suitable for rad terrain
    Last edited by AZguy; 05-21-2019, 06:17 PM.

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  • calfee20
    replied
    Here are some Minions for you. They are noisy on pavement.

    Click image for larger version

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ID:	87253

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  • AZguy
    replied
    I'm looking at Maxxis Minions in 26x4.8" for the next set

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  • treolan
    replied
    I'm pleased with my Continental tires but will replace them with Schwalbe Super Moto-X soon.

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  • Retrorockit
    replied
    I'm very happy with my Schwalbe Big Apple Plus tires.
    I'm going to throw out some tire theory here.
    Tires work by volume of air and air pressure. For the same load a smaller volume tire will need more pressure.
    Footprint is load divided by pressure. 100# load with 100psi=1 square inch footprint. 50 psi=2 square inch 20psi= 5 square inches, etc.
    Ride quality is a function of frequency. The lower the pressure the lower the ride frequency. Smooth ride generally starts at around 30 PSI and less.
    For a suspension to improve ride quality it needs to have a lower frequency than the tires. Most offroad suspensions aren't designed for this. Heavy bikes have a lower frequency with the same tire pressure than light bikes.
    Large tires can have good rolling resistance, but this gets eaten up quickly during acceleration by the extra rotating mass, and at high speeds the aerodynamic drag. That's why human powered bikes use the smallest tire that are suitable for the speed required. For an E bike the considerations are different unless extreme range, or top speed are required. Then the laws of physics will stilll apply. The limits will be different though.Rolling resistance is a very small part of the equation most of the time.
    I personally find a 30PSI tire with a suspension fork ( tuned for soft initial travel) and soft seat post works for me. Bu then I ride on very flat roads. I've never ridden a Fat Bike so I really can't comment. But bigger is better really does have a lot going for it on an e bike. For urban riding I do like the quick handling and maneuverability of a 26" bike I'm not sure the bigger tires would do what I want in that regard.
    Last edited by Retrorockit; 05-17-2019, 02:52 PM.

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  • ncmired
    replied
    I started with the stock Continental 700C 32mm tires on my first build (Priority Eight with a BBSHD motor). Pushed at peak speeds commuting, I wore 'em out in seemingly no time, and switched to Schwalbe 38-40mm tires which are holding up very well. I run 'em about 75% max PSI - I think this pressure level reduces the vibration from the typical tarred gravel roads I'm on.

    All three of my current bikes have tubed Schwalbe guard version tires - 26" by 2.1" Big Ben, 650B by 2.8" Super Moto X, and the mentioned 700C by 40mm Road Cruiser. Very low tread wear and NO flats so far.

    As far as rolling resistance, oddly the Super Moto X bike seem to roll the easiest. I may have a draggy Alfine hub on the 700C bike.

    P.S. On my first, decent bike (early seventies Raleigh International), I rode sew-ups pumped up to over 130lbs - nice rollers, but lousy life, PITA tires. After that, I rode the steadily improving, mid-twenties width 700C clinchers.
    Last edited by ncmired; 05-17-2019, 03:36 PM.

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  • AZguy
    replied
    I'm a believer that with electric or no, wider is always better unless you are some sort of road racer

    Wider is safer since it won't spill you as easily on bumps, etc. and if you ever go off the hard surfaces even more so

    Some efficiency loss isn't a big deal when you have electric

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  • harpon
    replied
    I've tried to stay minimal and light- as thin as possible- 700x 28 was my e-bike starting point. On my lighter bike with only a front basket I have no plans to change.
    The bike weighs only 42 pounds with 2 hover battery packs but stripped of pump and lock and blinkies, etc. (Can anyone beat that?)

    The other ride is heavier with a rear rack, folding saddlebag baskets, a large silver fish battery, and I can add a front basket if I really want some groceries. I'm getting ready to put a Kenda 32mm on the rear because the 28 tire is wearing rather quickly, yet I've had no problems otherwise.

    I don't want to fall at 65 or be changing tires excessively either, but doubt I'll ever put more than 28mm on the front especially. Mostly smooth semi-urban roads and paths in Jacksonville, and never off-road. Racing taught me with my own body- skinny and hard use less energy.


    https://electricbike.com/forum/filed...018&type=thumb

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  • MoneyPit
    replied
    Originally posted by Bullfrog View Post
    Just a little info...the Schwalbe Super moto tire in size 27.5x2.8 has a 50 kph speed rating which is the highest available for a bicycle tire. AND it has the highest load rating of any speed rated bicycle tire that I can find.
    50 kph is only 31 mph. Normal cruise speed below peak for a normal ebike in a 3-Class state. Those ratings are more meaningful in the EU where they clamp down so hard on speed.

    I've found that if you want speed-safe tires, for the smaller sizes that means staying away from non-tubeless-ready high-tpi-count tires. a 120 tpi tire meant for use with tubes typically has a skin-thin sidewall. Get that same tire in 30 tpi and now you have a tire casing that handles 35 mph for thousands of miles.

    Otherwise... buy tubeless tires and those tires have a thick enough casing regardless of thread count that they work at ebike speeds. I just went tubeless with Vee Snowshoe XLs and as 120 tpi tires go, they have some mighty thick sidewalls.

    For a bike that doesn't wear clown shoes, a Maxxis Minion is hard to beat for an off road tire.

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  • Bullfrog
    replied
    Just a little info...the Schwalbe Super moto tire in size 27.5x2.8 has a 50 kph speed rating which is the highest available for a bicycle tire. AND it has the highest load rating of any speed rated bicycle tire that I can find. There are a few other sizes available but the 27.5x2.8 has the highest load rating. I like the relatively high volume as well...just gives a little softer/smoother ride.

    Here is a link to the tire on the Schwalbe web site: https://www.schwalbetires.com/bike_t...s/super-moto-x

    Warning...not all sizes of the tire are speed rated.

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  • marcva
    replied
    Originally posted by FatMarty View Post
    I really like my 2" Schwalbe Marathon Deluxe ebike tires; but they are about $65 a pop and Schwalbe tubes suck.
    So my advice is get 'thorn resistant' or slime tubes in the heavy guage rubber, and whatever tire you run keep it properly inflated.
    Also learn to pick your butt up off the seat when approaching a hard bump to ease the shock to the tire/tube combo.
    There are tires rated for fast ebikes; but the ratings top out at 50 kmh; so for most of us it's a crap shoot at high speed.
    My commuter bike moves comfortably at 35 MPH, which has made me look to suspension and better tires. I have an anthem frame on the way and suppose that the Marathons will be the tire of choice. Question. My commute includes a couple mile long stretches on a canal tow path...flat with fine gravel and dirt. Is there enough width and shoulder on these to provide stability at speed? Or should I try something with more shoulder to it like Continental Double fighters? https://www.trailheadcycling.com/pro...i-250038-1.htm The Schwalbe speed rating means a lot to me as someone who drives an M3...

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